LAN trouble--Red X


W

W. eWatson

I'm trying to install camera software on a friend's XP. Actually, the
camera is outside the house, and there's an intermediate box connected
to the PC by an ethernet cable (crossover). The camera is plugged into
the box. I'm pretty confident that we have the right TCP/IP addresses.

If I got to Control Panel, I see two network icons: LAN and
RealTek8139. He doesn't really have a LAN. I'm guessing the realtek port
is the the ethernet port on the PC.

With everything in place, one fires up the camera software, and presses
the Connect button. It should turn green, but does nothing. No green
button and no picture. Comments?

Here are the instructions from the Sentinel (camera) arrangement for
setting IP addresses.
===========================
The Video Sentinel box contains a micro-controller (RCM3200 from Rabbit
Semiconductor) with an Ethernet port that has been configured with a
fixed IP address. By default, the IP address of the Video Sentinel box
is 10.0.0.50. This address is set in the firmware of the
micro-controller and should allow the Video Sentinel box to be used
in a local network. If a different IP address is required, however, the
firmware can be changed at Sandia.

The Network Interface Card that you use to communicate with Video
Sentinel box should be set with a compatible IP address. For example, I
typically set the IP address of the NIC to 10.0.0.2 and set the Subnet
Mask to 255.0.0.0.
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Char Jackson

I'm trying to install camera software on a friend's XP. Actually, the
camera is outside the house, and there's an intermediate box connected
to the PC by an ethernet cable (crossover). The camera is plugged into
the box. I'm pretty confident that we have the right TCP/IP addresses.
How many physical Ethernet ports does the PC have? Is one of those
ports connected directly to the "intermediate box"? Do the setup
instructions say you should use a crossover cable?

What is the IP address and netmask of the Ethernet port that's
connected to the "intermediate box"? Since the "intermediate box" has
an IP address of 10.0.0.50 it means the directly-connected Ethernet
port on the PC will need an IP address in that subnet, usually with a
netmask of 255.255.255.0, unless a router is in play.

If the PC has a single Ethernet port and it's currently being used for
Internet access, for example, a switch would make sense because it
would allow you to continue using the Internet connection (with the IP
addressing currently configured) while allowing you to set a second IP
address for use with the camera. If you use a switch, however, the
crossover cable should be replaced with a straight cable.
 
W

W. eWatson

How many physical Ethernet ports does the PC have? Is one of those
ports connected directly to the "intermediate box"? Do the setup
instructions say you should use a crossover cable?
One I think. Yes, the arrangement needs a crossover. It has the cable
that was provided by the producer of the box.
What is the IP address and netmask of the Ethernet port that's
connected to the "intermediate box"?
I thought I pasted in the instructions from the manual. Guess not. See
below. 10.0.0.2
Since the "intermediate box" has
an IP address of 10.0.0.50 it means the directly-connected Ethernet
port on the PC will need an IP address in that subnet, usually with a
netmask of 255.255.255.0, unless a router is in play.
No router that I'm aware of. The computer has a wireless facility. I
would guess though there's a router upstair his wife's PC is connected to.
If the PC has a single Ethernet port and it's currently being used for
Internet access, for example, a switch would make sense because it
would allow you to continue using the Internet connection (with the IP
addressing currently configured) while allowing you to set a second IP
address for use with the camera. If you use a switch, however, the
crossover cable should be replaced with a straight cable.
Connect the Video Sentinel box to your PCs Network Interface Card (NIC).
If you are connecting the Video Sentinel box to the computer through a
hub, then standard Ethernet cables should suffice (10/100Base-T). If,
however, you want to connect directly from the
PC to the Video Sentinel box, you should use a crossover Ethernet cable.
Either cable type can be found at office supply stores.

The Video Sentinel box contains a micro-controller (RCM3200 from Rabbit
Semiconductor) with an Ethernet port that has been configured with a
fixed IP address. By default, the IP address of the Video Sentinel box
is 10.0.0.50. This address is set in the firmware of the
micro-controller and should allow the Video Sentinel box to be used
in a local network. If a different IP address is required, however, the
firmware can be changed at Sandia.

The Network Interface Card that you use to communicate with Video
Sentinel box should be set with a compatible IP address. For example, I
typically set the IP address of the NIC to 10.0.0.2 and set the Subnet
Mask to 255.0.0.0. Connect the incoming video cable from the video
camera to the BNC connector on the Video Sentinel.

Plug in the power supply AC power cord and connect the power supply DC
cable to the Video Sentinel box power supply input.

Turn on the PC.
 
C

Char Jackson

One I think. Yes, the arrangement needs a crossover. It has the cable
that was provided by the producer of the box.
To be clear, it only needs a crossover cable if one end is connected
to the PC and the other end is connected to that box. If there's a
hub, switch, router, standalone firewall, or other networking device
in the middle then the cables need to be straight through.

It's troubling, though, that you don't know if there's more than one
Ethernet port on the PC because if there is it could mean that you're
configuring the wrong port.
I thought I pasted in the instructions from the manual. Guess not. See
below. 10.0.0.2
You did provide some of the instructions from the manual, but
apparently you mixed in some other info, so I didn't know where the
instructions left off. So you're saying the box has 10.0.0.50 and the
PC has 10.0.0.2 with a netmask of 255.0.0.0, right? Can you ping the
box? Does the Ethernet port have a solid Link light? Does it have a
flashing Activity light? Link and Activity are LEDs that are located
right next to where the Ethernet cable plugs in.
Since the "intermediate box" has
No router that I'm aware of. The computer has a wireless facility. I
would guess though there's a router upstair his wife's PC is connected to.
Unless you say otherwise, I assume the wireless stuff is not related
to this camera installation. I assume it's an entirely different
network.
Connect the Video Sentinel box to your PCs Network Interface Card (NIC).
If you are connecting the Video Sentinel box to the computer through a
hub, then standard Ethernet cables should suffice (10/100Base-T). If,
however, you want to connect directly from the
PC to the Video Sentinel box, you should use a crossover Ethernet cable.
Either cable type can be found at office supply stores.

The Video Sentinel box contains a micro-controller (RCM3200 from Rabbit
Semiconductor) with an Ethernet port that has been configured with a
fixed IP address. By default, the IP address of the Video Sentinel box
is 10.0.0.50. This address is set in the firmware of the
micro-controller and should allow the Video Sentinel box to be used
in a local network. If a different IP address is required, however, the
firmware can be changed at Sandia.

The Network Interface Card that you use to communicate with Video
Sentinel box should be set with a compatible IP address. For example, I
typically set the IP address of the NIC to 10.0.0.2 and set the Subnet
Mask to 255.0.0.0. Connect the incoming video cable from the video
camera to the BNC connector on the Video Sentinel.

Plug in the power supply AC power cord and connect the power supply DC
cable to the Video Sentinel box power supply input.

Turn on the PC.
Have you done all that?
 
W

W. eWatson

To be clear, it only needs a crossover cable if one end is connected
to the PC and the other end is connected to that box. If there's a
hub, switch, router, standalone firewall, or other networking device
in the middle then the cables need to be straight through.
None of the above, and no firewall.
It's troubling, though, that you don't know if there's more than one
Ethernet port on the PC because if there is it could mean that you're
configuring the wrong port.
I'll ask my friend today how many ethernet ports it has. Actually, here
are the specs:
You did provide some of the instructions from the manual, but
apparently you mixed in some other info, so I didn't know where the
instructions left off. So you're saying the box has 10.0.0.50 and the
PC has 10.0.0.2 with a netmask of 255.0.0.0, right? Can you ping the
Yes. BTW, he lives 45 miles away from me.
box? Does the Ethernet port have a solid Link light? Does it have a
flashing Activity light? Link and Activity are LEDs that are located
right next to where the Ethernet cable plugs in.
I'll ask. BTW, the box has no LED. It's not possible to tell if it's on
or off. I don't think it's broken though.
....

Unless you say otherwise, I assume the wireless stuff is not related
to this camera installation. I assume it's an entirely different
network.
The PC has a port of a wireless Belkin card, which it uses to get to the
internet. The wireless is not related to the camera.
 
Ad

Advertisements

W

W. eWatson

I'm trying to install camera software on a friend's XP. Actually, the
camera is outside the house, and there's an intermediate box connected
to the PC by an ethernet cable (crossover). The camera is plugged into
the box. I'm pretty confident that we have the right TCP/IP addresses.

If I got to Control Panel, I see two network icons: LAN and RealTek8139.
He doesn't really have a LAN. I'm guessing the realtek port is the the
ethernet port on the PC.

With everything in place, one fires up the camera software, and presses
the Connect button. It should turn green, but does nothing. No green
button and no picture. Comments?

Here are the instructions from the Sentinel (camera) arrangement for
setting IP addresses.
===========================
The Video Sentinel box contains a micro-controller (RCM3200 from Rabbit
Semiconductor) with an Ethernet port that has been configured with a
fixed IP address. By default, the IP address of the Video Sentinel box
is 10.0.0.50. This address is set in the firmware of the
micro-controller and should allow the Video Sentinel box to be used
in a local network. If a different IP address is required, however, the
firmware can be changed at Sandia.

The Network Interface Card that you use to communicate with Video
Sentinel box should be set with a compatible IP address. For example, I
typically set the IP address of the NIC to 10.0.0.2 and set the Subnet
Mask to 255.0.0.0.
One ethernet port. You've disappeared.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

red x 0
LAN TROUBLE 1
Pop3 Trouble on a LAN 5
Red X's on Network Shares 0
Red X on network drives. 1
Troubles with windows servers and LAN 0
LAN Troubles XP/ME 2
Red X on Mapped Drive on Reboot 0

Top