ipx setup


C

cisz

We've got 3 computers connected to a hub. The help file said to use ipx,
rather than tcp/ip to setup the network, which I did.

I haven't seen much detail regarding this type of setup.

The computers on the hub are connected ok but I haven't found clear
information on how to setup for users to login to the network from the
internet. (We have dsl.)

Help appreciated.
 
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S

Shenan Stanley

cisz said:
We've got 3 computers connected to a hub. The help file said to use
ipx, rather than tcp/ip to setup the network, which I did.

I haven't seen much detail regarding this type of setup.

The computers on the hub are connected ok but I haven't found clear
information on how to setup for users to login to the network from
the internet. (We have dsl.)

Help appreciated.
What 'help file' are you speaking of?
 
C

cisz

Shenan Stanley said:
What 'help file' are you speaking of?
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...docs/en-us/hnw_nohost_computerw.mspx?mfr=true
Individual Internet connections
If you have an external DSL or cable modem, you can connect it to an
Ethernet network hub and also connect your computers to the Ethernet hub as
this illustration shows. Each computer in the network has a direct
connection to the Internet through the network hub.

[...]

For file and printer sharing using this configuration, it is recommended
that you install a network protocol that is not used on the Internet, such
as IPX/SPX, and disable file and print sharing on TCP/IP For more
information about IPX/SPX, see IPX To install and enable file and printer
sharing using the IPX/SPX protocol, see To enable file and print sharing on
the IPX/SPX protocol

For a secure home or small office network, it is recommended that you
configure your network to take advantage of Windows XP Internet Connection
Sharing and Internet Connection Firewall or to use a residential gateway.
 
S

Shenan Stanley

<snip>
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...docs/en-us/hnw_nohost_computerw.mspx?mfr=true
Individual Internet connections
If you have an external DSL or cable modem, you can connect it to an
Ethernet network hub and also connect your computers to the
Ethernet hub as this illustration shows. Each computer in the
network has a direct connection to the Internet through the network
hub.
[...]

For file and printer sharing using this configuration, it is
recommended that you install a network protocol that is not used on
the Internet, such as IPX/SPX, and disable file and print sharing
on TCP/IP For more information about IPX/SPX, see IPX To install
and enable file and printer sharing using the IPX/SPX protocol, see
To enable file and print sharing on the IPX/SPX protocol

For a secure home or small office network, it is recommended that
you configure your network to take advantage of Windows XP Internet
Connection Sharing and Internet Connection Firewall or to use a
residential gateway.
Wow - that's old. ;-)

I think you may be using old reference material and over-thinking things.

Get a Cable Modem/DSL NAT device/router. Something that gives you your own
private LAN (Local Area Network) usually in the 192.168.x.x range - but it
can be in the 10.10.x.x range in some cases. Many times - more frequently
than not these days - the Cable Modem or DSL modem itself has a NAT
device/router built in. The only problem is that usually they also only
have a single network port for such things - meaning you either need a
network switch or you (if wireless) you put a wireless network device in all
of your computers that don't have one already. ;-)

In other words - if you actually are using a HUB - chunk it and spend the
$40 U.S. on a router/NAT device. Your setup is easier, safer and your life
gets better. ;-)

Essentially - if you get a NAT device (home router) - you can connect your
DSL, Cabel or other high-speed Internet modem to the router/NAT device and
then all your computers connect to it. They get DHCP (automatically
assigned) IP addresses from the device and when you talk between computers
on that LAN (local area network) - you are only speaking across the
router/NAT device - not the Internt - meaning you are limited to the lowest
connection speed to the device itself - not your Internet connection speed.
So if you get a gigabit router and all of your computers are connected via
wire to it - you get gigabit computer-to-computer speeds and whatever your
Internet speed (whatever you pay for) to the Internet. The box does all the
routing for you.

If your high-speed Internet modem does not have a built in 4-port wired
and/or wireless router... I suggest you get something that does. I like
Netgear stuff, but everyone has their own opinion. I recommend the Netgear
WGR614 <-- very reliable, easy to setup, etc.
 
C

cisz

Shenan Stanley said:
<snip>
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...docs/en-us/hnw_nohost_computerw.mspx?mfr=true
Individual Internet connections
If you have an external DSL or cable modem, you can connect it to an
Ethernet network hub and also connect your computers to the
Ethernet hub as this illustration shows. Each computer in the
network has a direct connection to the Internet through the network
hub.
[...]

For file and printer sharing using this configuration, it is
recommended that you install a network protocol that is not used on
the Internet, such as IPX/SPX, and disable file and print sharing
on TCP/IP For more information about IPX/SPX, see IPX To install
and enable file and printer sharing using the IPX/SPX protocol, see
To enable file and print sharing on the IPX/SPX protocol

For a secure home or small office network, it is recommended that
you configure your network to take advantage of Windows XP Internet
Connection Sharing and Internet Connection Firewall or to use a
residential gateway.
Wow - that's old. ;-)

I think you may be using old reference material and over-thinking things.

Get a Cable Modem/DSL NAT device/router. Something that gives you your
own private LAN (Local Area Network) usually in the 192.168.x.x range -
but it can be in the 10.10.x.x range in some cases. Many times - more
frequently than not these days - the Cable Modem or DSL modem itself has a
NAT device/router built in. The only problem is that usually they also
only have a single network port for such things - meaning you either need
a network switch or you (if wireless) you put a wireless network device in
all of your computers that don't have one already. ;-)

In other words - if you actually are using a HUB - chunk it and spend the
$40 U.S. on a router/NAT device. Your setup is easier, safer and your
life gets better. ;-)

Essentially - if you get a NAT device (home router) - you can connect your
DSL, Cabel or other high-speed Internet modem to the router/NAT device and
then all your computers connect to it. They get DHCP (automatically
assigned) IP addresses from the device and when you talk between computers
on that LAN (local area network) - you are only speaking across the
router/NAT device - not the Internt - meaning you are limited to the
lowest connection speed to the device itself - not your Internet
connection speed. So if you get a gigabit router and all of your computers
are connected via wire to it - you get gigabit computer-to-computer speeds
and whatever your Internet speed (whatever you pay for) to the Internet.
The box does all the routing for you.

If your high-speed Internet modem does not have a built in 4-port wired
and/or wireless router... I suggest you get something that does. I like
Netgear stuff, but everyone has their own opinion. I recommend the
Netgear WGR614 <-- very reliable, easy to setup, etc.
We have a Westell 6100 dsl modem that only has 1 connection. We got a
device from Radio Shack to increase the connectors but I thought they called
it a "hub". I guess it's actually a network switch. (The LAN is
192.168.x.x).

The modem (supplied by Verizon) didn't come with a manual so I guess I'll
need to find one.

So - we don't need to set up anything in windows - just with the modem?

Thanks for your help.
 
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C

cisz

[...]
Wow - that's old. ;-)

I think you may be using old reference material and over-thinking things.

Get a Cable Modem/DSL NAT device/router. Something that gives you your
own private LAN (Local Area Network) usually in the 192.168.x.x range -
but it can be in the 10.10.x.x range in some cases.
[...]

I'm not sure I'm understanding. I've been talking to someone in a web forum
for the westell 1600 router/modem and he's been saying you have to have
either netbios over ipx or netbios over ip in order to set up a lna and that
they both are setup in windows.

Is there is some way to set up the lan using only the router/modem?
 
S

Shenan Stanley

cisz said:
I'm not sure I'm understanding. I've been talking to someone in a
web forum for the westell 1600 router/modem and he's been saying
you have to have either netbios over ipx or netbios over ip in
order to set up a lna and that they both are setup in windows.

Is there is some way to set up the lan using only the router/modem?
Start button --> RUN
(no "RUN"? Press the "Windows Key" + R on your keyboard)
--> type in:
cmd /k ipconfig
--> Click OK.

What are the IP Address(es) listed for each network interface - are the ones
you are using 192.168.xxx.xxx (following that pattern) or a 10.10.xxx.xxx
pattern maybe?

Now - open Internet Explorer and visit:

http://whatismyip.com

That IP is likely different than the one you have locally - because your DSL
Modem is also a router and you are on a Local Area Network (a private LAN)
so that the computers/devices on that private LAN can communicate with one
without going out to the Internet first - just staying on that private
network. This means they can communicate as quickly as the router (and
other devices) they are connected to allows... 10mbit, 100mbit, 1gbit, etc.
(Theoretical speed - you won't get that in reality.)
 
C

cisz

Shenan Stanley said:
Start button --> RUN
(no "RUN"? Press the "Windows Key" + R on your keyboard)
--> type in:
cmd /k ipconfig
--> Click OK.

What are the IP Address(es) listed for each network interface - are the
ones you are using 192.168.xxx.xxx (following that pattern) or a
10.10.xxx.xxx pattern maybe?

Now - open Internet Explorer and visit:

http://whatismyip.com

That IP is likely different than the one you have locally - because your
DSL Modem is also a router and you are on a Local Area Network (a private
LAN) so that the computers/devices on that private LAN can communicate
with one without going out to the Internet first - just staying on that
private network. This means they can communicate as quickly as the router
(and other devices) they are connected to allows... 10mbit, 100mbit,
1gbit, etc. (Theoretical speed - you won't get that in reality.)
Is this article, http://www.wikihow.com/Set-up-a-Private-Network what you
mean by "netbios over ip"?

It says: "Configure the computers for networking. Go to internet options
(this varies depending on the Operating System), and go to the dialog box
that lets you change the TCP/IP protocol. Change the radio buttons from
"Obtain from DHCP server automatically" to "Use the following IP address:".
Type in your IP address for that computer, and the appropriate subnet mask
(255.255.255.0).

If you have no routers, leave the "Default Gateway" and "DNS server" fields
blank.

If connecting to the internet using NAT, use the Host Address assigned to
the router between your private network and the internet as both the DNS
server and the Default Gateway. Do not use the Network Address
(192.168.2.0)"

I don't feel I have a clear understanding of it though.
 
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C

cisz

David B. said:
Why do you need a router and a switch with only 3 computers?
The router is a dsl modem/router with only one terminal available for a
computer. The switch makes it possible for all 3 computers to connect to the
modem.
 
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