INXI


Abarbarian

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Inxi is an amazing tool to check hardware information on Linux

A very common thing linux users struggle with is to find what hardware has the OS detected and how well. Because unless the OS is aware of the hardware, it might not be using it at all. And there an entire ocean of commands to check hardware information.
There are quite a few gui tools like hardinfo, sysinfo etc on the desktop, but having a generic command line tool is far more useful and this is where Inxi works well. Inxi is a set of scripts that will detect a whole lot of information about the hardware, including vendor details, device driver configuration etc. And most importantly, it will print everything in a easy to read format.

Inxi: Find System And Hardware Information On Linux

Inxi is a command line tool that can be used to find the complete system and hardware details such as;



    • Hardware,
    • CPU,
    • Drivers,
    • Xorg,
    • Desktop,
    • Kernel,
    • GCC version,
    • Processes,
    • RAM usage,
    • and other useful information.


The home page for the project has some interesting information and is well worth a peruse.

http://smxi.org/site/about.htm

inxi is a read-only script, in other words, it will not change or modify anything in your system, it merely tries to read from a variety of sources information about your system, so you can show and see what you want in an easy to use format.

The following quote from the home site is a fine example of penguin life. A whole host of folk all making a contribution big or small and enjoying themselves whilst producing a fine tool that is available to everyone for free.

inxi is a group project

Unlike the other scripts on this page, inxi is co-developed, a group project, primarily with trash80 on the programming side. But the nice people at irc.oftc.net channel #linux-smokers-club all really have to be considered to be co-developers because of their non-stop enthusiasm and willingness to provide real time testing and debugging of inxi development.


Without a wide range of diverse Linux kernel based Free Desktop systems to test on, we could never have gotten inxi to be as reliable and solid as it's turning out to be.


And of course, locsmif, who figured out a lot of the core methods, logic, and tricks used in inxi, has to be considered as a primary author as well, even if inxi has been officially forked from his infobash script.


This link gives easy access to the on-line man page and a host of inxi information sites.


http://smxi.org/docs/inxi.htm

Installing inxi if it is not already included with your os is relatively easy. For example if using Debian or a derivative like MINT you would do the following.

Code:
$ sudo apt-get install inxi

After you have pressed ENTER the above will ask you for a password, this will be your users password and not the root password. Then follow any in terminal instructions.

I find inxi a most useful program, enjoy.

:cool:

Here are a couple of examples from my temporary pc.



 
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Abarbarian

Acruncher
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I found another good article on INXI. The information is given in a very user friendly way and shows some of the useful tricks this fine tool can accomplish. Do not be put of by the title the information is presented in a very new user friendly fashion.

Inxi – A Powerful Feature-Rich Commandline System Information Tool for Linux

For example with the network name changes that have been made to linux it can be hard to remember what your network is called.
Below you can see the results of,
Code:
$inxi -N
$inxi -n
$inxi -i
$inxi -Nni



Want to know some information about your hdd/ssd's. Need to find out what the mount point of your usb stick is. No worries inxi can reveal all.

Here I have used,

Code:
$inxi -D
$inxi -P
$inxi -p
$inxi -op

As you can see I have two usb ports used on my pc. One for a drive dock and one usb stick with the MX-17 distro installed. Finding the correct mount point for the usb stick is easy with the "-D" option.



Have fun in penguin land folks. :cool:
 
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