Idiots posting full version prices


J

Joe Ogiba

I keep reading all the blowhards on Cnet etc saying how Vista prices are so
high and all they post are full version prices. WTF, who buys full versions
unless you want to run it on an Intel Mac. All new PC's come with Windows
and end user buy the upgrade version. Upgrade Version of Vista Basic is the
same $99 price as XP and Vista Premium upgrade is $159.
 
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A

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]

Depends Joe, according to the XP OEM license agreement, it is not suppose to
be used on another computer. Also, if you using a qualifying product to
upgrade a PC that you build, you need to have the original FPP (full
packaged product) to use the upgrade license. Also, in the case of the OEM
license that comes with a PC, if that machine dies, the license is stuck to
it.
 
J

Joe Ogiba

Andre, I used a full version of Windows 2.0 to get the 3.0 upgrade price
and have purchased only upgrades of 3.1,95.98,ME and XP. I did buy the full
version of NT 4.0 in 1996 but I could have just used upgrades of 95,98,XP
etc. I have never purchased a new PC since I purchased a used IMB AT with
DOS 3.3 and have built my own ever since. I bet 99% of consumers either get
Windows pre-installed with a new PC or buy the upgrade version.

Joe
 
A

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]

I have been depending on my good old NT 4 FPP since 1996 to purchase
subsequent upgrades such as 2000 and XP. My ALR machine came with a full
copy of 95 and I used that to purchase upgrades for 98, 98 SE and ME. :)
 
G

Guest

Hmm.. does this mean that if I buy an upgrade of Vista, and at some point in
the future I build a new PC with brand new hard drives, I could still use the
upgrade version, but I'd have to install my full version of XP MCE first?
 
G

Guest

Hmm.. does this mean that if I buy an upgrade of Vista, and at some point in
the future I build a new PC with brand new hard drives, I could still use the
upgrade version, but I'd have to install my full version of XP MCE first?
 
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D

David Wilkinson

HellsChicken said:
Hmm.. does this mean that if I buy an upgrade of Vista, and at some point in
the future I build a new PC with brand new hard drives, I could still use the
upgrade version, but I'd have to install my full version of XP MCE first?

I think you would just need to insert your XP CD when asked. But I don't
know for sure.

David Wilkinson
 
A

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]

As David notes, you will just have to insert the disk to qualify for the
upgrade. It will check you media to see if its full version, although I have
managed to use a Upgrade CD as qualifying product.
 
J

Joe Ogiba

On my last build (Core 2 Duo) I installed XP by using my upgrade CD and it
asked for a previous version to qualify it as an upgrade so I just put in my
old ME upgrade CD. So with the Vista Premium upgrade DVD you just put in
your XP Home upgrade CD to qualify. Since all the Vista beta,RC1 and RC2
DVD's are full versions you did not need the XP CD to install it.
 
A

Andre Da Costa [Extended64]

According to the license agreement, you need the full package product for
which upgrade version of the software designates as qualifying. We have not
had access to upgrade builds of Vista to test this scenario, so you won't
know until you go in the store and look on the Vista Edition upgrade
packages.

So, in the case of Vista, (which only allows upgrades from XP anyway), if
you purchase Vista Business Upgrade, and qualifying media could be a full
version of either NT 4 or 2000 Professional, XP Professional.

Vista Home Premium:
I don't know the qualifying versions of Windows, but lets assume, full
versions of 98 SE, ME and XP.

Of course Microsoft could introduce a cut off point because they want more
of us to buy the full package product which cost more than the upgrade,
which means, the cut off point for qualifying could be XP.
 
J

Joe Ogiba

If Microsoft is that stupid to not allow you to install the Vista upgrade
DVD when all you have is Windows (95,98,ME,XP) upgrade versions since the
first full version (Windows 2.0) then they will start loosing marketshare
fast. I have my full versions of Windows NT 4.0 and the Windows Server 2000
(10 client) HOT (Hands on Training) CD but they don't qualify for Vista
Premium upgrade. If that is true then on June 1 2007 I will format the HD
with Vista RC2 and install Linux to run along with XP.
 
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R

Roy Coorne

Joe said:
If Microsoft is that stupid to not allow you to install the Vista upgrade
DVD when all you have is Windows (95,98,ME,XP) upgrade versions since the
first full version (Windows 2.0) then they will start loosing marketshare
fast. I have my full versions of Windows NT 4.0 and the Windows Server 2000
(10 client) HOT (Hands on Training) CD but they don't qualify for Vista
Premium upgrade. If that is true then on June 1 2007 I will format the HD
with Vista RC2 and install Linux to run along with XP.

Why Linux along with XP? XP with SP2 fulfills your needs and will
supported til 2009 and 2014, see
<http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/?p1=3223>.

Linux as as Server?


Roy
 
G

Guest

To answer your question, I will be.

I have tried upgrades and such in the past, but have always found it more of
a pain to me than just doing a fresh load. I would rather go ahead and pay
the full price for Home Premium or Ultimate than deal with upgrading.

But hey, that's just me.
 
B

Brian Wescombe

Joe Ogiba said:
I keep reading all the blowhards on Cnet etc saying how Vista prices are so
high and all they post are full version prices. WTF, who buys full versions
unless you want to run it on an Intel Mac. All new PC's come with Windows
and end user buy the upgrade version. Upgrade Version of Vista Basic is the
same $99 price as XP and Vista Premium upgrade is $159.

Except in the UK, where an Upgrade for Vista Premium will likely be over
£200 (around 400 USD)
 
B

Brian Wescombe

Andre Da Costa said:
Depends Joe, according to the XP OEM license agreement, it is not suppose
to be used on another computer.

I've used my generic XP OEM CD and licence key on several different machines
(only one at a time). I've never had any trouble with activation. It may not
be strictly legal but it works.


Also, if you using a qualifying product to
 
A

Alias

Gene said:
To answer your question, I will be.

I have tried upgrades and such in the past, but have always found it more of
a pain to me than just doing a fresh load. I would rather go ahead and pay
the full price for Home Premium or Ultimate than deal with upgrading.

But hey, that's just me.

You can use an upgrade version for a clean install. You just need a
qualifying OS CD handy.

Alias
 
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J

Jerry P

You will wish after you buy just the upgrade, that you bought the full
version. (R.O.F.L)
Jerry
 
S

Saucy Sass

Try to obtain an OEM version or an 'Upgrade' version as they both can be
used to do a clean install. The license difference between OEM and Full
Retail is so slim now that the price of the Full Retail doesn't justify
buying it.

Assuming nothing changes between now and January:

If you try to do a 'clean' install from scratch by booting from an 'Upgrade'
version Vista DVD, you may have to supply the install routine with
'qualifying media' i.e. at one point during the install, the installer asks
you to pop out the Vista DVD and pop in an old Windows CD (a Windows 2000 or
XP or what_have_you CD) - you put in the old CD, the installer checks it and
then continues, eventually asking you to pop the Vista DVD back in.
Otherwise the installation is *exactly the same* as an OEM or Full Retail
installation.

So there's really no point what so ever to buy the Full Retail version.
 
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A

Alias

Saucy said:
Try to obtain an OEM version or an 'Upgrade' version as they both can be
used to do a clean install. The license difference between OEM and Full
Retail is so slim now that the price of the Full Retail doesn't justify
buying it.

Assuming nothing changes between now and January:

If you try to do a 'clean' install from scratch by booting from an 'Upgrade'
version Vista DVD, you may have to supply the install routine with
'qualifying media' i.e. at one point during the install, the installer asks
you to pop out the Vista DVD and pop in an old Windows CD (a Windows 2000 or
XP or what_have_you CD) - you put in the old CD, the installer checks it and
then continues, eventually asking you to pop the Vista DVD back in.
Otherwise the installation is *exactly the same* as an OEM or Full Retail
installation.

So there's really no point what so ever to buy the Full Retail version.

There will be generic OEM Vista version available?

Alias
 

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