I ran Macrium Reflect Free.


O

OldGuy

I want to completely backup my laptop's Win XP Pro with just installed
applications pristine C: drive to
1) a different partition on the same drive
2) an external USB drive

I want to use an Image (not a clone).

A) Macrium Reflect Free says it does do both Image and Clone.
I ran the Image backup and it ran to completion.

Question: If C: crashes completely (NOT a hardware failure, but is a
software mishmash), how do I restore ALL from that Image? Say C: is
not bootable. i.e. I expect to restore to the pristine bootable Win
XP Pro with installed pristine apps that I started with.

B) I used Macrium Reflect to create the recovery disk. I choose the
Win (not Linux) recovery disk. I used a DVD.
It ran to completion. It downloaded some large 1.5 GByte file and wrote
to the DVD.

I tried to boot from it but nothing happened. I looked at the DVD and
found stuff on it but nothing that looked like anything bootable.

Question: what should I have gotten?

If this is not the best way to do all of this, what are better options?
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul

OldGuy said:
I want to completely backup my laptop's Win XP Pro with just installed
applications pristine C: drive to
1) a different partition on the same drive
2) an external USB drive

I want to use an Image (not a clone).

A) Macrium Reflect Free says it does do both Image and Clone.
I ran the Image backup and it ran to completion.

Question: If C: crashes completely (NOT a hardware failure, but is a
software mishmash), how do I restore ALL from that Image? Say C: is not
bootable. i.e. I expect to restore to the pristine bootable Win XP Pro
with installed pristine apps that I started with.

B) I used Macrium Reflect to create the recovery disk. I choose the Win
(not Linux) recovery disk. I used a DVD.
It ran to completion. It downloaded some large 1.5 GByte file and wrote
to the DVD.

I tried to boot from it but nothing happened. I looked at the DVD and
found stuff on it but nothing that looked like anything bootable.

Question: what should I have gotten?

If this is not the best way to do all of this, what are better options?

You were supposed to create the Linux disc. Why ? Because it works.
And, because it doesn't require downloading WAIK. I did the Linux disc
here, and it doesn't require learning Linux. It's just a means of
booting into the Macrium interface.

The Macrium_Linux_Rescue.iso I have here, is an ISO9660 file. You burn
that with Imgburn or Nero or some other burner application that knows
how to convert an ISO9660 file into a bootable CD. The ISO9660 file is
an image of a file system, in a way.

If you do it right, on the resulting CD or DVD, you should see files like:

initrd ~8MB
kernel ~4MB
memtest86+.bin
memtest86.bin
boot.catalog
boot (folder)
...

Just to give you some idea if the burn worked properly. You should
*not* see just a single file like Macrium_Linux_Rescue.iso on the disc,
because that would mean you did it wrong.

The boot process doesn't need any Linux knowledge. All you'll
see is the three screens, and you're dumped right into
the application itself. No Linux terminal or other junk.
The picture here, shows all three screens. Save the picture
and use an image viewer, if you need to zoom in a lot.

http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/1456/macriumlinuxboot.gif

Paul
 
L

Linea Recta

OldGuy said:
I want to completely backup my laptop's Win XP Pro with just installed
applications pristine C: drive to
1) a different partition on the same drive
2) an external USB drive

I want to use an Image (not a clone).

A) Macrium Reflect Free says it does do both Image and Clone.
I ran the Image backup and it ran to completion.

Question: If C: crashes completely (NOT a hardware failure, but is a
software mishmash), how do I restore ALL from that Image? Say C: is not
bootable. i.e. I expect to restore to the pristine bootable Win XP Pro
with installed pristine apps that I started with.

B) I used Macrium Reflect to create the recovery disk. I choose the Win
(not Linux) recovery disk. I used a DVD.
It ran to completion. It downloaded some large 1.5 GByte file and wrote to
the DVD.

I tried to boot from it but nothing happened. I looked at the DVD and
found stuff on it but nothing that looked like anything bootable.

Question: what should I have gotten?

If this is not the best way to do all of this, what are better options?



I believe you should use a CD as boot medium.
I have used Reflect (free version) quite a few times to restore my system
disc succesfully. After booting the (linux) CD I can find the image files,
e.g. on a connected USB drive and restore te selected image. It never failed
here, but I suppose it is also dependant on different used hardware
configurations.



--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os
 
V

VanguardLH

OldGuy said:
I want to completely backup my laptop's Win XP Pro with just installed
applications pristine C: drive to
1) a different partition on the same drive
2) an external USB drive

I want to use an Image (not a clone).

A) Macrium Reflect Free says it does do both Image and Clone.
I ran the Image backup and it ran to completion.

Question: If C: crashes completely (NOT a hardware failure, but is a
software mishmash), how do I restore ALL from that Image? Say C: is
not bootable. i.e. I expect to restore to the pristine bootable Win
XP Pro with installed pristine apps that I started with.

Presumably you saved the backup images to a different partition than the
Windows partition you backed up. That lets you do a restore but not if
the *disk* on which the Windows partition goes bad. So it best to save
the backup images to a partition on a different hard disk or to
removeable or external media.

For your #1 scenario, that will let you restore the Windows partition
provided that the hard disk for that Windows partition and your backup
partition doesn't die.

For your #2 scenario, the hard disk with the Windows partition can die,
you replace the hard disk, and you restore to the new hard disk.
Obviously in this scenario, the backup location must have media present
and available at the time you perform the backup. That means a disc
must be in the drive (of sufficient capacity to encompass the entire
backup) or the external drive powered up and visible as a drive within
Windows. While you may do these manual operations when you manually run
Macrium Reflect Free, you need to do the setup beforehand (put in a disc
or leave powered up an external drive) if you want to schedule periodic
image backups.

A scenario you didn't mention is using another hard disk on which there
is a partition to where you save your backup images. That is, Windows
is in a partition on one hard disk and your backups are in a partition
on a different hard disk. Since the other hard disk will always be
powered up, you can schedule your backups to save there. The downside
is that if your computer gets zapped, say, by lightning then it's
possible all your hard disks get zapped. Of course, in scenario #2
where you are using an external drive (that is still attached to your
computer), it can get zapped, too, either through its power cord or
across the USB cable. To protect against destruction of hardware, you
could use the external drive but have it connected (both power cord and
USB cable) only when you manually instigate an image backup; else, it
sits protected in a drawer against physical shock and completely
disconnected from everything.

Now, to restore the image to your hard disk (the old one or a new one),
you'll need the backup media (disc, external drive, other hard disk)
along with the bootable rescue CD you were supposed to make for Macrium
Reflect Free. When you create that bootable WinPE, you need to ensure
it includes SATA drivers if that's the interface for your hard disks.
You didn't mention what hard disk(s) you have. If you expect to access
a networked host to get at the backup images you saved over there, the
WinPE boot disc will need the drivers for the network interface in
whatever host in which you are performing the image restore. As I
recall, the WinPE image used (from Microsoft) is for Windows 7 so it
might have the SATA and network drivers needed for the hardware in the
host you are trying to restore but you should check. Boot using the
Macrium rescue CD and make sure you can find wherever you stored the
image backup files.
B) I used Macrium Reflect to create the recovery disk. I choose the
Win (not Linux) recovery disk. I used a DVD.
It ran to completion. It downloaded some large 1.5 GByte file and wrote
to the DVD.

Actually Macrium makes it easier than some other backup programs. They
are all downloading, installing, and using Microsoft's AIK (Automated
Installation Kit). It is used to create images of Windows that then are
used to prep multiple hosts with the same image (obviously when using
multiple licensing). Under the conditions of using Win7 as a rescue
environment, Microsoft permits its use since you are trying to rescue
another license of Windows.

The Windows Automated Installation Kit (AIK) for Windows 7
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5753

Some backup programs (that provide the plug-in needed under the WinPE
environment - not all do) have you go to Microsoft's site to download
their AIK and install it and then you have to figure out how to use it
to create a modified image to put on your bootable rescue media. Easeus
is like this so it is a difficult chore to create a WinPE boot disc.
See what I had to go through with Easeus ToDo Backup at:

http://forum.easeus.com/viewtopic.php?t=22410

It's a very manual operation and prone to error. It took me around 3
tries to get an image file that had the necessary drivers and would work
with the Easeus function in their GUI to create a bootable rescue CD.
Macrium makes the process far easier. They will do the download and
install for you (you only need the minimal installation for use by
Macrium Reflect) and they provide scripts to run through the process of
creating the boot image for the rescue CD.
I tried to boot from it but nothing happened. I looked at the DVD and
found stuff on it but nothing that looked like anything bootable.

Do you have your BIOS configured to include optical drives as a boot
device? Presumably you put the WAIK-modified image (that includes
Macrium's plug-in to run their restore from there) on a CD or DVD (since
that's what you mention). However, maybe your optical drive isn't
internal and instead connective via USB. That means you need to
configure your BIOS to allow booting from the USB device.

So if you put some other bootable disc in your DVD drive, like the one
to install Windows, does it boot okay?
Question: what should I have gotten?

If your BIOS is configured to include the optical drive as a boot device
and if the image was properly modified (to add the Macrium plug-in for
its restore program) and if the necessary drivers were included in the
image (SATA since Windows XP doesn't include them and if you're using
SATA disks instead of IDE) then you should've seen what looks like a
boot into Windows 7; however, that's only the initial boot screens since
right after Windows 7 loads then the Macrium plug-in gets loaded and you
should see their restore GUI on the screen.
 
O

OldGuy

Some notes:

I used the non-Linux recovery disk because it said that was
recommended.

I used a DVD because it said it was downloading a >1GByte file to be
written on it.

The DVD reader/writer is internal to the laptop.
I have booted from that drive before.

The recovery DVD created did not boot.
I did not see files related to booting after it was created.

I have created other CD / DVD (like Part Magic etc) from .ISO before
and know how to do that. Use Nero 7 Burning. Works fine.

I plan to have three partitions on the laptop.
Part 1 = Win XP Pro
Part 2 = data of all sorts
Part 3 = recovery for Win XP Pro.
Each is ~100GBytes and that will be fine for my circumstances.

I also plan to have an external USB drive contain the recovery Image
for Win XP Pro.

Right now I am making sure all is installed and working on the laptop
then I will make my pristine recovery IMAGE (not clone).

I have tried it once and got a 70% smaller Image than the Properties
shows on the C: as expected (some compression expected).
It made the recovery data on the 3rd partition very quickly. Nice.

Now if I can get comfortable with a recovery DVD or CD (Linux) that
would be good.

More consultation would be enlightening and I thank you for your
support!
 
P

Paul in Houston TX

OldGuy said:
Some notes:

I used the non-Linux recovery disk because it said that was recommended.

I used a DVD because it said it was downloading a >1GByte file to be
written on it.

The DVD reader/writer is internal to the laptop.
I have booted from that drive before.

The recovery DVD created did not boot.
I did not see files related to booting after it was created.

I have created other CD / DVD (like Part Magic etc) from .ISO before and
know how to do that. Use Nero 7 Burning. Works fine.

I plan to have three partitions on the laptop.
Part 1 = Win XP Pro
Part 2 = data of all sorts
Part 3 = recovery for Win XP Pro.
Each is ~100GBytes and that will be fine for my circumstances.

I also plan to have an external USB drive contain the recovery Image for
Win XP Pro.

Right now I am making sure all is installed and working on the laptop
then I will make my pristine recovery IMAGE (not clone).

I have tried it once and got a 70% smaller Image than the Properties
shows on the C: as expected (some compression expected).
It made the recovery data on the 3rd partition very quickly. Nice.

Now if I can get comfortable with a recovery DVD or CD (Linux) that
would be good.

More consultation would be enlightening and I thank you for your support!

As other have mentioned:
You have to make the CD/DVD bootable. There should be a check
box somewhere on what ever burner you use for that.
Get the Linux version.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

BeeJ

I finally figured out by poking around, how to generate the non-Linux
recovery disk. I could not find instructions but did finally click on
enough things to see what would happen if ... and it seemed happed with
one of the paths I took and then demanded I put a fresh CD in the drive
and it went to work burning it.

The recovery disk is approx 470KBytes.

I also created the Linux recovery CD so now I heve two recovery
methods.

BTW it took forever and a day to download that 1.6G Win file for the
non-Linux version. Don't know why but it did. It started out fast but
slowed to a snails pace. Must be punshment for not buying the non-free
Macrium Reflect. Oh well, it is done now, I hope.

Thanks all for the support.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

Macrium Let Me down 4
Image Restore 9
Restoring disk image 6
Image C: 16
Is "sync" what I want? 11
Image backups 20
Image Restore Part II 5
Imaging/Backup software 76

Top