How long will chkdsk /f /r take on a 1.7 TB drive


M

maxkumar

Hi,
I have a Windows 2000 Advanced Server (with SP4) machine in our production
environment which is connected to a SAN storage. One of the drives in the SAN
(mounted as drive letter T on the server) is corrupted. The capacity of that
drive is 1.7 terabytes and there are about 3 million files currently on that
drive (used space about 1.2 TB). I would like to run a chkdsk on the drive
with /f /r arguments. Can anyone help me provide a rough gauge on how long
will chkdsk take to run on such a large drive? I know there will be a
significant downtime required, but I want to get a rough idea on how long
will that be so that I can tell my customers what to expect. Also, please let
me know if there is any better alternative that chkdsk for such a scenario?
Thanks a lot in advance.
 
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M

maxkumar

My apologies, but I forgot to mention that this T drive is configured as RAID
5 on the SAN storage. And there are no problems with the disk itself since
the RAID manager does not show any bad sectors. The corruption problem is
with the file system and file allocation table, hence I wanted to run chkdsk.
I suppose since this is a RAIDed drive, I will not be able to run chkdsk with
/r option since the physical disk(s) are not exposed to windows in this case?
 
J

JPagd

Ok I would be interested in seeing an answer to this, the link just takes me
right back to the news group.

Dave Patrick said:
They may have an idea here. x-posted to: microsoft.public.storage

http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.aspx?dg=microsoft.public.storage&mid=9bc0b5dd-6fbf-4a71-bf64-4e98e766ac15



--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


maxkumar said:
My apologies, but I forgot to mention that this T drive is configured as
RAID
5 on the SAN storage. And there are no problems with the disk itself
since
the RAID manager does not show any bad sectors. The corruption problem is
with the file system and file allocation table, hence I wanted to run
chkdsk.
I suppose since this is a RAIDed drive, I will not be able to run chkdsk
with
/r option since the physical disk(s) are not exposed to windows in this
case?
 
K

Kenny Speer

Depends on:
CPU cores and speed
Memory amount and speed
Type of connection to the storage array
CPU throughput of storage array
Type of disk setup on storage array
etc etc etc

Best bet is to run it for your system and then record it for later
reference.
Ok I would be interested in seeing an answer to this, the link just takes me
right back to the news group.

Dave Patrick said:
They may have an idea here. x-posted to: microsoft.public.storage

http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.aspx?dg=microsoft.public.storage&mid=9bc0b5dd-6fbf-4a71-bf64-4e98e766ac15



--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


maxkumar said:
My apologies, but I forgot to mention that this T drive is configured as
RAID
5 on the SAN storage. And there are no problems with the disk itself
since
the RAID manager does not show any bad sectors. The corruption problem is
with the file system and file allocation table, hence I wanted to run
chkdsk.
I suppose since this is a RAIDed drive, I will not be able to run chkdsk
with
/r option since the physical disk(s) are not exposed to windows in this
case?

:

Hi,
I have a Windows 2000 Advanced Server (with SP4) machine in our
production
environment which is connected to a SAN storage. One of the drives in the
SAN
(mounted as drive letter T on the server) is corrupted. The capacity of
that
drive is 1.7 terabytes and there are about 3 million files currently on
that
drive (used space about 1.2 TB). I would like to run a chkdsk on the
drive
with /f /r arguments. Can anyone help me provide a rough gauge on how
long
will chkdsk take to run on such a large drive? I know there will be a
significant downtime required, but I want to get a rough idea on how long
will that be so that I can tell my customers what to expect. Also, please
let
me know if there is any better alternative that chkdsk for such a
scenario?
Thanks a lot in advance.
 
J

JPagd

Ok, I get that, but I have been running a chkdsk /r on a 1TB iScsi SAN (RAID
5 Serial ATA 750GB drives with Hot Spare) for about 3 hours now and it
appears like it is "stuck" in one spot. Specifically it has been on step 2
verifying indexes for the majority of that time. It found one error in step
one and and a few so far in index check but has been in this same spot for a
while:

CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 5)...
0 percent complete. (25000 of 818032 file records processed)
Deleting corrupt attribute record (128, "")
from file record segment 26016.
8 percent complete. (719426 of 818032 file records processed)
Deleting corrupt attribute record (128, "")
from file record segment 722554.
818032 file records processed.
File verification completed.
10 percent complete. (1 of 39 large file records processed)
Deleting orphan file record segment 17.
39 large file records processed.
0 bad file records processed.
0 EA records processed.
0 reparse records processed.
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 5)...
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.
Correcting error in index $O for file 25.

My question would be twofold.

a. Does this sound normal? Or is it possible for the proccess to be "hung"
b. If this doesn't finish in the next few hours, is it safe to cancel the
operation? If I do what would be the implications, if any?

I'm running this off of a Windows 2003 VM that is running in an ESX set-up
with 2 hosts each 12GB RAM, dual proc, 2+ (don't remember the specifcs of the
clock speeds) I can tell it's still running or doing something as the VM is
very slow (others on the setup run as normal), however how long should I let
this continue.

Any info is helpful, thanks!


Kenny Speer said:
Depends on:
CPU cores and speed
Memory amount and speed
Type of connection to the storage array
CPU throughput of storage array
Type of disk setup on storage array
etc etc etc

Best bet is to run it for your system and then record it for later
reference.
Ok I would be interested in seeing an answer to this, the link just takes me
right back to the news group.

Dave Patrick said:
They may have an idea here. x-posted to: microsoft.public.storage

http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.aspx?dg=microsoft.public.storage&mid=9bc0b5dd-6fbf-4a71-bf64-4e98e766ac15



--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


:
My apologies, but I forgot to mention that this T drive is configured as
RAID
5 on the SAN storage. And there are no problems with the disk itself
since
the RAID manager does not show any bad sectors. The corruption problem is
with the file system and file allocation table, hence I wanted to run
chkdsk.
I suppose since this is a RAIDed drive, I will not be able to run chkdsk
with
/r option since the physical disk(s) are not exposed to windows in this
case?

:

Hi,
I have a Windows 2000 Advanced Server (with SP4) machine in our
production
environment which is connected to a SAN storage. One of the drives in the
SAN
(mounted as drive letter T on the server) is corrupted. The capacity of
that
drive is 1.7 terabytes and there are about 3 million files currently on
that
drive (used space about 1.2 TB). I would like to run a chkdsk on the
drive
with /f /r arguments. Can anyone help me provide a rough gauge on how
long
will chkdsk take to run on such a large drive? I know there will be a
significant downtime required, but I want to get a rough idea on how long
will that be so that I can tell my customers what to expect. Also, please
let
me know if there is any better alternative that chkdsk for such a
scenario?
Thanks a lot in advance.
 
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M

maxkumar

Hi,
I thought I would update everyone on my attempt to perform chkdsk on my
system so that everyone can benefit from the numbers I gathered. Firstly some
info about my system:
---------------------------------------
I have a Windows 2000 Advanced Server SP4 that is connected by a
FiberChannel switch to a SAN device. The size of the drive in question is 1.7
Terabytes set up in RAID 5 configuration (hardware RAID). This drive had
about 4 folders with a total of 4 million files in them. We knew it was
corrupted because of a previous attempt to delete some of the files which
threw a file system error. I also gathered that the error must be with the
filesystem and not with the disks itself, because the SAN manager alerts us
in case there is a problem with the physical disk. This meant that I need not
and should not run chkdsk with /r flag.../f or /X would suffice.

Preparation tasks
--------------------
Before running chkdsk, I installed the updates referenced to by the
following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles for the Win 2000 SP4 system:
KB873437 - http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=873437
KB831375 - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/831375/

Chkdsk Results
------------------
We had a 4 day long weekend period during which I decided to run chkdsk. So
I started on the Friday evening at around 8pm with chkdsk /X flag. I
monitored the progress as and when and found that it was indeed deleting a
lot of index entries and recovering thousands of files. The process finally
completed on Monday around 11am. It recovered about 500K files. So in
summary,
Time taken to run chkdsk/X on a 1.7 TB drive with 4 million files ~ 63 hours.

Hope the above info is useful to people who are looking for an estimate on
chkdsk run time on a system with similar parameters.
 

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