How do I insrtall XP from scratch?


C

casey.o

I've installed Win98 and Win2000, but never XP. I have a laptop that
came with XP installed, but someone gave me a desktop computer, which
works, but has no hard drive. The woman told me she used it several
years ago, and her former boyfriend replaced the main board. (I assume
the motherboard). It has a newer ASUS M2A-VM board, with a AMD Anthlon
64 processor 3200+. The case has a label for XP Home Edition, with reg
number. But I have a feeling this was on the case, and has no relation
to the current MB.

Anyhow, it boots to Bios, but needs a hard drive before I can do
anything with it. I have one ordered. I am aware this processor is a
dual core, so I need XP Pro to use this double processor, because XP
Home Ed. cant handle the dual core. Otherwise, Home Ed. would be fine
for my needs.

Anyhow, I have a generic XP pro CD. But no registration # for THIS
computer, since the one on the case is for Home Ed. However, I have
several dead computers that have labels with reg. #s on the case for XP
pro. Can I use them?

I'm not trying to get off free, but XP is np longer sold, so I dont
think I have much choice, unless I can find a complete used copy on ebay
or something, with the reg #.

Is what I'm doing possible? Othereise I could probably get a copy of
Home ED and usethe number on the case.

One other thing, I understand that MS is going to abandon XP real soon.
When that happens, how will someone validate new installs of XP? Or
will XP beconme unusable entirely, if it needs to be reinstalled?

Lastly, when I install from a CD, do I just boot from the CD, or do I
need a DOS boot floppy? (There is no floppy drive, but I can snag one
from one of my dead computers).

Thanks
 
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J

JJ

I've installed Win98 and Win2000, but never XP. I have a laptop that
came with XP installed, but someone gave me a desktop computer, which
works, but has no hard drive. The woman told me she used it several
years ago, and her former boyfriend replaced the main board. (I assume
the motherboard). It has a newer ASUS M2A-VM board, with a AMD Anthlon
64 processor 3200+. The case has a label for XP Home Edition, with reg
number. But I have a feeling this was on the case, and has no relation
to the current MB.

Anyhow, it boots to Bios, but needs a hard drive before I can do
anything with it. I have one ordered.

If you're going to use SATA harddisk, the Windows XP installation won't be
able to recognize it since the official Windows XP CD doesn't include any
SATA driver.

Some motherboard BIOSes have a setting to set a SATA harddisk to an IDE
mode. If that setting doesn't exist, you'll need to make a slipstreamed
Windows XP CD that include the SATA driver for at least that motherboard.

An IDE mode SATA harddisk is slower than native SATA. Once you've installed
Windows XP (slipstreamed with SATA driver or not) into the IDE mode SATA
harddisk, you shouldn't change it back to native SATA. Otherwise, the
installed Windows XP may not boot. Same goes if the Windows XP was installed
into SATA harddisk in native SATA mode. Changing it to IDE mode may cause
the installed Windows XP unbootable.
Anyhow, I have a generic XP pro CD. But no registration # for THIS
computer, since the one on the case is for Home Ed. However, I have
several dead computers that have labels with reg. #s on the case for XP
pro. Can I use them?

I'm not trying to get off free, but XP is np longer sold, so I dont
think I have much choice, unless I can find a complete used copy on ebay
or something, with the reg #.

Is what I'm doing possible? Othereise I could probably get a copy of
Home ED and usethe number on the case.

As long as they're for the same Windows XP edition. i.e.: Windows XP Home
serial number for Windows XP Home CD *only*. Same goes to the Pro version.
One other thing, I understand that MS is going to abandon XP real soon.
When that happens, how will someone validate new installs of XP? Or
will XP beconme unusable entirely, if it needs to be reinstalled?

Windows activation will still work since Microsoft still make the Windows XP
activation server available. Windows Update is also still available. Heck,
Windows Update for Windows 2000 is still available too.
Lastly, when I install from a CD, do I just boot from the CD, or do I
need a DOS boot floppy? (There is no floppy drive, but I can snag one
from one of my dead computers).

Boot from the Windows XP CD. DOS and floppy drive are not needed.
 
P

philo 

If you're going to use SATA harddisk, the Windows XP installation won't be
able to recognize it since the official Windows XP CD doesn't include any
SATA driver.



That's only true for the original XP or sp1

as long as the CD is at least sp2, most SATA drivers are included
 
C

casey.o

If you're going to use SATA harddisk, the Windows XP installation won't be
able to recognize it since the official Windows XP CD doesn't include any
SATA driver.

Some motherboard BIOSes have a setting to set a SATA harddisk to an IDE
mode. If that setting doesn't exist, you'll need to make a slipstreamed
Windows XP CD that include the SATA driver for at least that motherboard.

An IDE mode SATA harddisk is slower than native SATA. Once you've installed
Windows XP (slipstreamed with SATA driver or not) into the IDE mode SATA
harddisk, you shouldn't change it back to native SATA. Otherwise, the
installed Windows XP may not boot. Same goes if the Windows XP was installed
into SATA harddisk in native SATA mode. Changing it to IDE mode may cause
the installed Windows XP unbootable.

I really didn't want to use a SATA drive, but there are no plugs for IDE
data cables on this motherboard. That kind of pissed me off, because I
have a whole box of spare IDE drives, even though most are smallish,
like 40 gig and less. I dont see all that much advantage to SATA. I
was told they are a little faster, but from what you're saying, I'll
lose the speed anyhow. Not having any choice, I ordered a used drive on
Ebay. I dont want to spend a lot on this project because there is no
guarantee this system really workd, except the woman that gave it do me
said it did except for the harddrive, and it does boot into Bios right
now.

I did download a PDF manual online, and it is strictly setup only for
SATA. Asus is supposed to make an excellent MB, but I was disappointed
to fidn no support for IDE drives. At least they still hae a plug for
floppy drives, although this case dont have the room to put one. But
there's always other cases, or just plug it in and let it sit inside
loose. But it seems I wont need it anyhow. Floppies are pretty much
dead, but I still have lots of them with stuff stored on them. But my
old Win98 / Win2000 computer can read them and transfer the data to CD
or USB stick if needed.

Thanks
 
B

BillW50

That's only true for the original XP or sp1

as long as the CD is at least sp2, most SATA drivers are included

I wish! Some XP SP2 does have the SATA drivers, but not the ones from
Microsoft. I do not have any XP SP3 discs, but I have heard multiple
times that Microsoft XP SP3 discs do have them.
 
B

BillW50

Some motherboard BIOSes have a setting to set a SATA harddisk to an IDE
mode. If that setting doesn't exist, you'll need to make a slipstreamed
Windows XP CD that include the SATA driver for at least that motherboard.

I am surprised you didn't mention about a second option of just putting
the SATA drivers on a floppy. And early in the install press F6 to use
the SATA drivers on the floppy. Although pulling out an old floppy drive
out of an older machine and installing it in the newer machine might be
more trouble than it is worth. :-|
 
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M

Mayayana

|
| I really didn't want to use a SATA drive,

You can buy IDE adaptors as PCI cards. I don't
know offhand what they cost. I built a new box
recently with an Asus board that has an "IDE
emulation" option, but that's the first I've seen.

Also, I'm not sure anyone clarified this: Pro is
licensed for unlimited installs, as long as it's only
one at a time. So any Pro key for a copy that's
no longer in use should activate and is legal.
 
C

casey.o

I wish! Some XP SP2 does have the SATA drivers, but not the ones from
Microsoft. I do not have any XP SP3 discs, but I have heard multiple
times that Microsoft XP SP3 discs do have them.

So, what you're saying is that I'm gonna have a tough time either way.
Maybe I would have been better off just buying a used computer with XP
pre-installed. This is the main reason I've continued to use Win98 and
Win2000 all these years. XP seems like a major hassle to install,
particularly with that validation crap.

From the looks of things, (I have been reading many webpages since my
original post), I may not even be able to use my XP Cd. It's an OEM for
a Dell computer. This computer I want to install it in, is a NO NAME
brand. The case dont even say what it is, but I know the case dont
matter anyhow. It's just based on the motherboard, processor, memory,
etc. Either way, it's NOT a Dell (thank God, I hate Dell). So, it
appears to be likely I cant use this OEM install CD.

I looked on Ebay and the prices for retail versions of XP pro are high.
Actually, I stumbled across a complete computer, (except monitor) WITH
XP PRO installed, and repair disks, for less than the price of most of
these retail versions for XP pro. It almost seems like these sellers
are price gouging for a product that is nearly obsolete. I could
probably buy Win7 or Win8 for about the same amount (except I dont want
them).

I'll try to find the drivers for this MB, and see if that OEM can be
validated. I know one site suggested doing it by phone, not internet.
If that dont work, I'll probably just install Windows 2000 on it.
(Hoping there are drivers for this MB, and it will accept the SATA
drive). At least Win2000 dont need all that verification crap. I do
really have a valid Reg#, for XP pro, from a retired computer which I
own, but is not worth fixing, but that is yet another brand (not a
Dell). I forget what it is, it's out in the garage, I'm guessing
Gateway, but not sure????
So, I'm doubtful I can use that reg# on a NO NAME computer with a Dell
OEM install CD.... ?????

Of course there's always Linux, but that's a whole other story, and I'm
too used to Windows to want to change, and relearn, not to mention Linux
seems suited to the Geek types, which I;m not one of.....

I just wanted a newer and faster computer than the 14 year old one I now
use, which seems to be screwing up more and more lately because the RAM
loses contact on the MB, and I have to keep removing and cleaning it
about every 2 or 3 weeks. Yet, Win2000 would suffice for my needs,
which is mostly just to go on the internet. I have my XP laptop, but I
prefer a desktop computer with bigger screen, full size keyboard, and a
much larger drive.

Final comment, if MS makes it this complicated to move a legal copy of
XP (by Reg#), to another computer, I sure hate to think how much worse
it must be to do the same with Win7 or 8. It's surely not like Win98,
which I have actually moved the hard drive, (with the same
installation), to at least 5 computers. I only needed to add soem
drivers, and was ready to go.
 
B

BillW50

Also, I'm not sure anyone clarified this: Pro is
licensed for unlimited installs, as long as it's only
one at a time. So any Pro key for a copy that's
no longer in use should activate and is legal.

Boy that is very different from from my memory. As I recall if it is a
full retail version, this is true (Home or Pro does not matter).
Although upgrade or OEM versions cannot be moved. In addition, both
upgrade/OEM, one is allowed to upgrade the hardware.
 
C

casey.o

I am surprised you didn't mention about a second option of just putting
the SATA drivers on a floppy. And early in the install press F6 to use
the SATA drivers on the floppy. Although pulling out an old floppy drive
out of an older machine and installing it in the newer machine might be
more trouble than it is worth. :-|

If I can do that, it seems to really simplify matters. I'd rather
install a floppy, than even begin to know how to make a "slipstreamed"
CD. I wouldn't know where on the CD to place the drivers.

Of course that's assuming I can even use my Dell OEM Cds for XP.
 
P

philo 

On 02/16/2014 06:58 AM, (e-mail address removed) wrote:


I'll try to find the drivers for this MB, and see if that OEM can be
validated. I know one site suggested doing it by phone, not internet.
If that dont work, I'll probably just install Windows 2000 on it.
(Hoping there are drivers for this MB, and it will accept the SATA
drive). At least Win2000 dont need all that verification crap. I do
really have a valid Reg#, for XP pro, from a retired computer which I
own, but is not worth fixing, but that is yet another brand (not a
Dell). I forget what it is, it's out in the garage, I'm guessing
Gateway, but not sure????
So, I'm doubtful I can use that reg# on a NO NAME computer with a Dell
OEM install CD.... ?????

Of course there's always Linux, but that's a whole other story, and I'm
too used to Windows to want to change, and relearn, not to mention Linux
seems suited to the Geek types, which I;m not one of.....

I just wanted a newer and faster computer than the 14 year old one I now
use, which seems to be screwing up more and more lately because the RAM
loses contact on the MB, and I have to keep removing and cleaning it
about every 2 or 3 weeks. Yet, Win2000 would suffice for my needs,
which is mostly just to go on the internet. I have my XP laptop, but I
prefer a desktop computer with bigger screen, full size keyboard, and a
much larger drive.

Final comment, if MS makes it this complicated to move a legal copy of
XP (by Reg#), to another computer, I sure hate to think how much worse
it must be to do the same with Win7 or 8. It's surely not like Win98,
which I have actually moved the hard drive, (with the same
installation), to at least 5 computers. I only needed to add soem
drivers, and was ready to go.



First off, do not worry about the SATA drivers, you machine is probably
ATA anyway and that's a moot point. The real problem is the OEM cd you
have which is for a Dell...so the product stickers you have would not
have a working s/n anyway.


Win2k is not a good choice if you want to use the machine on-line.


I have been using Linux full time for about 5 or six years
and if you want to use the machine mainly for Internet it should be a
good choice. Linux is very easy to install and use.

Ubuntu or Mint Linux should work ok
 
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P

philo 

On 02/16/2014 03:23 AM, (e-mail address removed) wrote:


I really didn't want to use a SATA drive, but there are no plugs for IDE
data cables on this motherboard. T



Oops didn't see that when I made my other post
 
D

Don Phillipson

If I can do that, it seems to really simplify matters. I'd rather
install a floppy . . .

This is feasible for any non-tech who knows one end of a screwdriver
from the other. Your public library will still have manuals from the
1990s telling you, step by step, how to assemble PCs from parts.

Remember to ensure the BIOS seeks system code from all
disk drives that will hold system code, i.e. include both drive A
(floppy) and drive C (CD.)
 
B

BillW50

So, what you're saying is that I'm gonna have a tough time either way.
Maybe I would have been better off just buying a used computer with XP
pre-installed. This is the main reason I've continued to use Win98 and
Win2000 all these years. XP seems like a major hassle to install,
particularly with that validation crap.

Well XP can be a major hassle sometimes. Although it also can be just as
easy as installing 98 or 2000. It just depends on a number of factors.
From the looks of things, (I have been reading many webpages since my
original post), I may not even be able to use my XP Cd. It's an OEM for
a Dell computer. This computer I want to install it in, is a NO NAME
brand. The case dont even say what it is, but I know the case dont
matter anyhow. It's just based on the motherboard, processor, memory,
etc. Either way, it's NOT a Dell (thank God, I hate Dell). So, it
appears to be likely I cant use this OEM install CD.

I am not a big fan of Dell either, but they do make some good stuff at
times. They also made some real lemons too. Anyway Dell Windows discs
generally work like this. If you use it on a Dell machine that
qualifies, no key (aka Reg#), no activation, or anything else required.
On a non-Dell machine, it acts like a generic OEM Windows install disc.
So you need an OEM key for it. But it should work fine otherwise, except
you might need SATA drivers to install.
I looked on Ebay and the prices for retail versions of XP pro are high.
Actually, I stumbled across a complete computer, (except monitor) WITH
XP PRO installed, and repair disks, for less than the price of most of
these retail versions for XP pro. It almost seems like these sellers
are price gouging for a product that is nearly obsolete. I could
probably buy Win7 or Win8 for about the same amount (except I dont want
them).

Oh yes! Don't overlook this option. My favorite used machines come from
the 2006/7 era. As most of them with Core2 and an Intel 945GM, are fully
compatible with XP, Vista, 7, and 8. They generally came with either XP
or Vista. I actually find them once in awhile brand new still sealed in
the original box.
I'll try to find the drivers for this MB, and see if that OEM can be
validated. I know one site suggested doing it by phone, not internet.
If that dont work, I'll probably just install Windows 2000 on it.
(Hoping there are drivers for this MB, and it will accept the SATA
drive). At least Win2000 dont need all that verification crap.

I never put Windows 2000 on any machine with a SATA drive(s). Although I
would guess it would be just like doing the same with XP (minus the
activation).
I do
really have a valid Reg#, for XP pro, from a retired computer which I
own, but is not worth fixing, but that is yet another brand (not a
Dell). I forget what it is, it's out in the garage, I'm guessing
Gateway, but not sure????
So, I'm doubtful I can use that reg# on a NO NAME computer with a Dell
OEM install CD.... ?????

It may work, but there are a few variables that could change things.
Of course there's always Linux, but that's a whole other story, and I'm
too used to Windows to want to change, and relearn, not to mention Linux
seems suited to the Geek types, which I;m not one of.....

I got very heavy into Linux back in 2008. I still have two machines with
Linux and I am not yet very impressed. Very poor choice of useful
applications and drivers is the big thing for me.
I just wanted a newer and faster computer than the 14 year old one I now
use, which seems to be screwing up more and more lately because the RAM
loses contact on the MB, and I have to keep removing and cleaning it
about every 2 or 3 weeks. Yet, Win2000 would suffice for my needs,
which is mostly just to go on the internet. I have my XP laptop, but I
prefer a desktop computer with bigger screen, full size keyboard, and a
much larger drive.

You know I quit buying desktop computers and went to laptops and
tablets. And many of them allows for a dock option. And that is what I
mostly do with them. Pop one into a dock that is already connected to an
external monitor, keyboard, mouse, drives, etc. Heck that is what I am
using right now. It is no hassle at all.
Final comment, if MS makes it this complicated to move a legal copy of
XP (by Reg#), to another computer, I sure hate to think how much worse
it must be to do the same with Win7 or 8. It's surely not like Win98,
which I have actually moved the hard drive, (with the same
installation), to at least 5 computers. I only needed to add soem
drivers, and was ready to go.

Both Paragon (aka Adaptive Restore) and Acronis (aka Restore to
Dissimilar Hardware) has software to make this very easy. The trick they
use is to replace all of the drivers with generic drivers that work with
anything.
 
M

Mayayana

| On 2/16/2014 6:52 AM, Mayayana wrote:
| > Also, I'm not sure anyone clarified this: Pro is
| > licensed for unlimited installs, as long as it's only
| > one at a time. So any Pro key for a copy that's
| > no longer in use should activate and is legal.
|
| Boy that is very different from from my memory. As I recall if it is a
| full retail version, this is true (Home or Pro does not matter).
| Although upgrade or OEM versions cannot be moved. In addition, both
| upgrade/OEM, one is allowed to upgrade the hardware.
|

Yes, I think you're right. The full version
can be moved, regardless of Home or Pro.
And while the hardware can be upgraded,
there are limits. Since there's really no such
thing as a PC, Microsoft ties the OS to the
motherboard. I wouldn't expect a changed
motherboard to activate with an OEM version.
 
V

VanguardLH

casey.o said:
I have a laptop that came with XP installed, but someone gave me a
desktop computer, which works, but has no hard drive. It has a newer
ASUS M2A-VM board, with a AMD Anthlon 64 processor 3200+. The case
has a label for XP Home Edition, with reg number. But I have a
feeling this was on the case, and has no relation to the current MB.

I am aware this processor is a dual core, so I need XP Pro to use
this double processor, because XP Home Ed. cant handle the dual core.
Otherwise, Home Ed. would be fine for my needs.

Anyhow, I have a generic XP pro CD. But no registration # for THIS
computer, since the one on the case is for Home Ed. However, I have
several dead computers that have labels with reg. #s on the case for XP
pro. Can I use them?

I'm not trying to get off free, but XP is np longer sold, so I dont
think I have much choice, unless I can find a complete used copy on ebay
or something, with the reg #.

Is what I'm doing possible? Othereise I could probably get a copy of
Home ED and usethe number on the case.

One other thing, I understand that MS is going to abandon XP real soon.
When that happens, how will someone validate new installs of XP? Or
will XP beconme unusable entirely, if it needs to be reinstalled?

Lastly, when I install from a CD, do I just boot from the CD, or do I
need a DOS boot floppy? (There is no floppy drive, but I can snag one
from one of my dead computers).

Do some research on the mobo to find out what SATA controller it uses.
Then go to the manufacturer's web site for that controller and get their
generic driver. If the mobo maker doesn't provide the SATA driver then
you have to go to the controller chip maker's web site to get a driver.
Since this is an XP install, you'll need a working floppy drive (XP's
install won't look anywhere else, as I recall). Put the driver onto a
floppy (unzip it if in a compressed file). When you start the
installation of XP, there will be a 1-line prompt at the bottom of the
screen saying to hit the F6 key if you need to install additional
drivers. XP doesn't come with all drivers and obviously none that came
out after XP was released. The install won't ask for the floppy right
away. First it will load a ton of drivers it includes merely to see
which ones will find recognizable hardware to load those drivers. Later
you will be prompted for the SATA driver. If you don't install the SATA
driver at this time, XP won't be able to find the mass storage device
(hard disk) to use to put its files.

As others have noted, and depending on which service pack level for the
XP install you have on CD, the included SATA drivers may work; however,
you should have the driver on a floppy already ready if XP doesn't have
a driver for the SATA controller on your mobo. Of course, you'll need
to have all the other drivers for your hardware ready, too, like for the
chipset and video drivers.

Have you yet visited http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M2AVM/ to get all
the drivers there for Windows XP? I didn't see one for a SATA driver.
Often they roll them into a RAID driver package. Although it says RAID,
you don't need to setup a RAID configuration but just get the SATA
driver from there. I glanced at the "ATI SB600 RAID/AHCI Controller
Driver" download and it has a bunch of .exe files which obviously cannot
be ran until there is an OS under which to load them. The path
\RAID\Driver\x86_x64\x86_XP in the .zip file looks to be where maybe you
could point XP's installer to find drivers (32-bit). There is also a
"Make ATI SB600 RAID Driver Disk" download that looks like you run an
..exe (on a working host) that will lay an image on a floppy for you.
They don't include a readme.txt file to tell you how to use it.

If you don't want to go to all the trouble of having a separate floppy
and CD with drivers, you can slipstream the drivers into the XP image
using nLite (http://www.nliteos.com/).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slipstream_(computing)

Basically you unroll the installer image off the install CD to put into
a folder on the hard disk, inject the drivers into that image, and burn
a new install CD with the drivers already included. You'll need a
working computer and a optical burner drive along with the XP install
CD, a CD-R disc, the driver packages (unzipped), and the nLite program.
Their site has a guide to help you figure out what to do and online
searches will find some more tutorials. Then if you ever have to
install XP again, use the slipstreamed version on the CD-R you burned.

Note that it sounds like all your XP licenses are OEM licenses. That
means you cannot use those licenses on any other computer. For example,
you said you have a laptop with XP. That is highly likely an OEM
license and always sticks to the laptop. You can't move it anywhere
else. Only if you have a retail (non-OEM) license can you move it to
another computer. You can upgrade or replace (repair) the hardware in
the computer to which an OEM license is attached but you cannot move an
OEM license off a computer once it is installed there. So do you have
any retail licenses of Windows XP that you're not using?

By the way, Windows XP Home Edition will not support multiple
PROCESSORS. It will support a single processor with 1, 2, 3, or 4
CORES. Processors are the physical chip or package you see. Inside a
processor can be 1, or more, "cores". You have 1 processor with 2
cores. The Home Edition will support 1 processor (any number of cores
up to 4). The EULAs regulate the number of processors that license will
support. There is no licensing fees for multiple cores within a
processor. So you can use Windows XP Home Edition on this 1-processor
2-core setup.

Since the crippled computer you got (lacking a hard drive) came with
Windows XP Home Edition and there is a COA sticker on the case for that
version of Windows (which is very likely an OEM version), you can
install XP Home on that computer using that sticker's product key;
however, you'll need the install CD for that version of Windows (it can
be either a retail or OEM image since the product key differentiates the
installation, not what is on the install CD).

If you don't have an install CD (media) for Windows XP Home, you can
sometimes find an eBay seller that is selling only the media (although
more often you find them selling only the license and no media). Of
course, you could just find a cheap sale of both media & license and
ignore or discard the COA sticker now on the case (for example,
http://tinyurl.com/lobl7bd - Windows XP Home, new, returns accepted, US
sellers but you can change the search criteria to what you like).

To amass all existing updates for Windows XP, look at using WSUSoffline.
It will connect to Microsoft's update site (as a WSUS server) and
download all updates accounting for superceded updates and dependencies.
Since the downloads are local, it doesn't matter if and when Microsoft
removes all Windows XP update downloads from their web site since you'll
have them locally.

http://download.wsusoffline.net/
 
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P

Paul

I really didn't want to use a SATA drive, but there are no plugs for IDE
data cables on this motherboard. That kind of pissed me off, because I
have a whole box of spare IDE drives, even though most are smallish,
like 40 gig and less. I dont see all that much advantage to SATA. I
was told they are a little faster, but from what you're saying, I'll
lose the speed anyhow. Not having any choice, I ordered a used drive on
Ebay. I dont want to spend a lot on this project because there is no
guarantee this system really workd, except the woman that gave it do me
said it did except for the harddrive, and it does boot into Bios right
now.

I did download a PDF manual online, and it is strictly setup only for
SATA. Asus is supposed to make an excellent MB, but I was disappointed
to fidn no support for IDE drives. At least they still hae a plug for
floppy drives, although this case dont have the room to put one. But
there's always other cases, or just plug it in and let it sit inside
loose. But it seems I wont need it anyhow. Floppies are pretty much
dead, but I still have lots of them with stuff stored on them. But my
old Win98 / Win2000 computer can read them and transfer the data to CD
or USB stick if needed.

Thanks

The machine *does* have an IDE connector.

It's turned sideways, which is why you didn't see it. They
used a 90 degree connector.

http://i60.tinypic.com/nqzj0y.gif

The Southbridge is SB600, which hosts both the IDE
connector (two drives on a ribbon), as well as four
SATA drives.

*******

Drivers are here:

http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=M2A-VM&p=1&s=24

If you wanted an AHCI driver for a SATA disk, you'd use this.
Otherwise, a slipstreamed installer disc should be sufficient.

http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/misc/sata/ATI_MAKEDISK_WinXP32bit64bit.zip

Sometimes, the drivers are split, into a bare package for your
F6 floppy (previous link). While a different download, has
the RAID Management software for a RAID control panel. But in
this case, you'd at most be looking for AHCI, and the MAKEDISK
version is likely enough. (Why these idiots can't just give us
a set of files, and let us copy it to a floppy, I'll never know.)

RAID - is for multiple disks, in an array (not essential)
ACHI - is for NCQ command queuing and hot plug (not essential)
IDE - is for when it "just has to work"

*******

The user manual is here. That's where I got the picture.

http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/socketAM2/M2A-VM/e3088_m2a-vm.pdf

See page 69 for "South OnChip IDE" device, and use the default settings.

On the same page, they hide the SATA ports under "South OnChip PCI".

Your choices there are IDE/RAID/AHCI. Using IDE, you won't
need a driver floppy. RAID and AHCI are handled by the same
F6 floppy option. If that MAKEDISK works properly, then there
should be a TXTSETUP.OEM file on the floppy at the top level of it.
The floppy would provide both RAID and AHCI drivers, something
the OS doesn't always have (not WinXP at least).

IDE uses built-in drivers, something you'll get with a
nicely-up-to-date slipstreamed installation CD.

*******

You can slipstream SP3 redistributable, into a new
installer CD, and install from there.

This tool does the slipstreaming. "Integrate a Service Pack".
It reads the existing CD, adds the Service Pack. Then, you use
the ISO9660 file to burn a new, bootable, installer CD.

http://www.nliteos.com/guide/part1.html

The Service Pack is here.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24

*******

If you need CD burner software, you can use Imgburn, being
careful to decline whatever adware or toolbar is inside. At
one time, Imgburn downloads were clean, but not any more.

You can get the checksum value, from the Imgburn site. This
would be a clean version, with no tricks.

https://web.archive.org/web/20090815083118/http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download

ImgBurn v2.5.0.0 (2,119 KB)
Released: Sunday 26th July 2009

CRC32: 39CD6FC6
MD5: F3791CFACDAC03B9E676E44AA2630243
SHA-1: E07BCC23B495D0A966BAE359EA9E0E3A11888454

Then download and verify that clean version, from here.

http://www.oldversion.com/windows/imgburn/

ImgBurn 2.5.0.0 Jul 26, 2009 2.07 MB

That's for if you don't own any CD burning software, to be
used with the output from NLite. Version 2.5.0.0 is the
last one I've tested here. (Note - in the preferences, turn
off the sound effects, or be prepared to be scared out
of your seat :) The author of Imgburn has a sense of humor.)

Paul
 
C

casey.o

The machine *does* have an IDE connector.

It's turned sideways, which is why you didn't see it. They
used a 90 degree connector.

http://i60.tinypic.com/nqzj0y.gif

The Southbridge is SB600, which hosts both the IDE
connector (two drives on a ribbon), as well as four
SATA drives.

Yep, I noticed that sideways connector, and found it's connected to the
TWO CD drives. One appears to be a CD reader, the other is a CD/DVD
burner. While I suppose I could get rid of one of them (but prefer not
to), I guess getting rid of one of those CD drives is the only way to
use an IDE drive. I am not aware of cables made for more than 2 IDE
drives, and dont think that is possible to have more than two on one IDE
"port". AM I CORRECT ON THIS?

This computer also has a multiple card reader installed. I'm nto sure
what they are really cvalled, but it will read all those camera cards,
and has USB ports all in the same panel. It plugs into a special place
on the MB. I like that option.

I CAN actually mount a floppy drive into the front panel, under that
multiple card reader. I thought that was the place for the hard drive,
but there are is a bracket on the inner part of the case for one
harddrive, needing a few screws. There's only ONE harddrive mount, so if
I want multiple hard drives, I'd need to make my own mount for elsewhere
in the case. This is not a big problem. Every computer I've owned
except my laptop has been homebuilt, going back ot the early 90s.
Installing hardware is easier than some of the hoops one has to cope
with to install software (the OS).

The SATA drive I bought is a 500gig. I could have gotten an 80 gig for
around $20, but I opted to pay $27 and go big. I have nearly 200 gigs
on my Win98 machine, (two hard drives), and they are darn near full.
(Lots of saved videos, music, and photos). Anyhow, if I could find a
way to do it, using the IDE cable to install one of my 40gig IDE drives,
and install the OS on that, then use the SATA drive as a secondary drive
for storage and programs. Of course I found conflicting info on the web
about using both types of drives on the same computer. One person said
it can NOT be done, whiel another said he does it all the time?????

Thanks to everyone who has helped. I better get back to work for now,
and may reply more later.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>,
So, what you're saying is that I'm gonna have a tough time either way.

Depends - if the BIOS has a setting to make the SATA behave like an IDE
(many do), you're fine - OK, SATA pretending to be IDE may work a little
slower.
[]
original post), I may not even be able to use my XP Cd. It's an OEM for
a Dell computer. This computer I want to install it in, is a NO NAME
brand. The case dont even say what it is, but I know the case dont
matter anyhow. It's just based on the motherboard, processor, memory,
etc. Either way, it's NOT a Dell (thank God, I hate Dell). So, it
appears to be likely I cant use this OEM install CD.

Well, Bill Gateway says you can, it just behaves like an OEM one (i. e.
will ask for the key).
I looked on Ebay and the prices for retail versions of XP pro are high.
Actually, I stumbled across a complete computer, (except monitor) WITH
XP PRO installed, and repair disks, for less than the price of most of
these retail versions for XP pro. It almost seems like these sellers
are price gouging for a product that is nearly obsolete. I could

I suspect that will be happening.
[]
So, I'm doubtful I can use that reg# on a NO NAME computer with a Dell
OEM install CD.... ?????

(Me too, but Bill said yes.)
[]
I just wanted a newer and faster computer than the 14 year old one I now
use, which seems to be screwing up more and more lately because the RAM
loses contact on the MB, and I have to keep removing and cleaning it
about every 2 or 3 weeks. Yet, Win2000 would suffice for my needs,
which is mostly just to go on the internet. I have my XP laptop, but I
prefer a desktop computer with bigger screen, full size keyboard, and a
much larger drive.

Well, you can always connect a proper keyboard and external monitor to
virtually any desktop (certainly XP-era ones); you could also add an
extra external USB drive, of course, though that'd be slower than the
internal one. You _may_ even be able to upgrade the internal HD,
assuming you could find one of the same interface (it may already be
SATA!); "just" upgrading the HD probably wouldn't be big enough to
trigger it needing reactivation (which should be done anyway, even if
you have to call them).
Final comment, if MS makes it this complicated to move a legal copy of
XP (by Reg#), to another computer, I sure hate to think how much worse
it must be to do the same with Win7 or 8. It's surely not like Win98,
which I have actually moved the hard drive, (with the same
installation), to at least 5 computers. I only needed to add soem
drivers, and was ready to go.
I did "move" Vista, to a bigger HD; however, that was from the restore
discs that had been made when the laptop was new (the HD died). It
installed to (and could see all of) the larger HD no problem.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>,
to), I guess getting rid of one of those CD drives is the only way to
use an IDE drive. I am not aware of cables made for more than 2 IDE
drives, and dont think that is possible to have more than two on one IDE
"port". AM I CORRECT ON THIS?

I'm pretty sure you are; I think there's only one wire in the IDE cable
that's involved with drive selection, so (for practical purposes) it can
only select between two drives. IDE drives have jumpers on them to
select which they are - and I've only heard of master and slave, no
third option.
This computer also has a multiple card reader installed. I'm nto sure
what they are really cvalled, but it will read all those camera cards,
and has USB ports all in the same panel. It plugs into a special place
on the MB. I like that option.

If it's using a connector that's not being used otherwise, then so do I.
I CAN actually mount a floppy drive into the front panel, under that
multiple card reader. I thought that was the place for the hard drive,

That makes sense - the hard drive doesn't usually protrude through the
case (not for many years, anyway - mainly since pre-IDE drives, when
they were about the size of a 5.25" floppy drive, usually black with a
red LED).
but there are is a bracket on the inner part of the case for one
harddrive, needing a few screws. There's only ONE harddrive mount, so if
I want multiple hard drives, I'd need to make my own mount for elsewhere
in the case. This is not a big problem. Every computer I've owned
except my laptop has been homebuilt, going back ot the early 90s.
Installing hardware is easier than some of the hoops one has to cope
with to install software (the OS).

Agreed. Though it's a lot less money-saving to DIY than it once was.
The SATA drive I bought is a 500gig. I could have gotten an 80 gig for
around $20, but I opted to pay $27 and go big. I have nearly 200 gigs
on my Win98 machine, (two hard drives), and they are darn near full.
(Lots of saved videos, music, and photos). Anyhow, if I could find a
way to do it, using the IDE cable to install one of my 40gig IDE drives,
and install the OS on that, then use the SATA drive as a secondary drive

That's certainly a viable way to go, if you're confident that the 40G
drive is reliable. I partitioned this (netbook) when I got it - when
first turned on, it asked me what I wanted, with the default being half
for C: and half for D: - into 30G for C: and the rest (113G) for D:.
for storage and programs. Of course I found conflicting info on the web

I intended (and have tried to keep to it) to keep C: for the OS _and_
software, and D: for data only; so far, after several years, C: is just
over 20G full, so your 40G should be fine. (My D: is 64.5G full, but I
don't have _that_ many videos - only about 22.5G of them.)
about using both types of drives on the same computer. One person said
it can NOT be done, whiel another said he does it all the time?????

I think it can, but do check further. I'd be most surprised if the BIOS
doesn't allow it.
 

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