Help with Outlook emails sent but not received by recipients.


G

Garry

I am experiencing major problems in sending emails via
outlook. I am usin AOL 8 as my internet connection, but
use a 3rd party as my email and web server. I am able to
receive emails and reply and forward emails. but I am
unable to sent new email messages properly. They are
leaving my pc and being registered as sent but they are
not arriving at their destination.

My settings are fixed, IP adresses etc and all pan out.
my server allows for only sending and they pan out.

Is this an outlook issue or is AOL blocking.

advice needed.

Regards

Gary
 
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D

Down Home

Garry,
Being as no MVP has responded yet, I'll give it a non expert try. Are you on
DSL or dial-up connection? If dial up, who's phone line are you dialing in
to when you try using outlook? You cannot use a POP3 (3rd party) server for
email 'IF' you are dialed into an AOL number. You would need to close
that connection and dial in to your POP3 account to use Outlook with them.

Hope this helps. Please post back either way.
Good Luck
 
J

Jeff Stephenson [MSFT]

I thought I or someone else had responded to this. It is AOL blocking
access to any SMTP servers but their own. This is, unfortunately, pretty
standard practice among ISPs nowdays - they're doing it in (IMHO) a
wrong-headed attempt to reduce spam.
 
B

Brian Tillman

Jeff Stephenson said:
This is, unfortunately,
pretty standard practice among ISPs nowdays - they're doing it in
(IMHO) a wrong-headed attempt to reduce spam.
You've made this statement before. I'm curious why you consider it
"wrong-headed". In fact, I'm not sure what you feel is "wrong-headed", the
attempt by ISPs to block SPAM or their blocking of relay. Could you expand
on this?
 
J

Jeff Stephenson [MSFT]

Note that here I'm speaking personally, and *not* for Microsoft:

Blocking spam (assuming it's done right) is admirable. What most ISPs are
doing, on the other hand, is turning the Internet from an open network into
a very tightly controlled network. If you get your Internet access via MSN,
AOL, or any number of other ISPs, the only SMTP server you're allowed to use
is theirs - they block port 25 to any servers but their own.

So when you set up an account to, say, your almunus account at your college,
and specify the college's servers, you'll find that you can't send mail
through that account because your ISP is blocking access to it. If you have
accounts with multiple ISPs, you'll only be able to send through the account
for the ISP you're using to connect to the Internet. If you switch your
access method (because you're travelling, say), you'll have to go change all
your account settings because now the different ISP you're using will only
let you use *their* server.

While these restrictions are nothing more than a PITA to people who know how
email works, the vast majority of users do *not* know what is going on and
how to deal with the situation - witness the number of times the issue comes
up here. ISPs claim that this allows them to control spam. What it really
does is keep them off RBLs (don't even get me started on *those*) that
decide to list anybody that allows access to off-network SMTP servers. Most
users think of the "Internet" as Web-access, and if you ask me the ISPs are
doing their best to dumb it down to just that...

--
Jeff Stephenson
Outlook Development
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
 
B

Brian Tillman

Jeff Stephenson said:
What it really does is keep them off RBLs (don't
even get me started on *those*) that decide to list anybody that
allows access to off-network SMTP servers.
RBLs, yes. VERY excellent tools for controlling SPAM.
 
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D

Down Home

Agreed. Not perfect, but what is? So far, the best we have on for a large
scale tool. Coupled with an 'Individually' controlled tool, and you can
control about 95% of spam. Pretty good percentage in my opinion. RBL's also
help those, like myself, that have email accounts on their own small
servers, enjoy the spam controlling capabilities of the BIG boys (MSN, AOL,
etc.). In my humble opinion, the way we view RBL's (emotionally, not
visually) can determine their personal success. I do not view RBL's as a
'bible' determining who is good and who is evil. I use them as a 'sorting
tool' to HELP weed out email I do not want. On my BIG boy accounts, I simply
peek at the 'BULK /JUNK' mail folders and UN-junk [did I just invent a new
word?] the ones that were accidentally rerouted. On my own server, I simply
purchased a popular anti-spam program and tweaked the RBL settings, and, as
on the BIG boys, I have a folder I can peek at occasionally and CONTROL what
the program does and does not reroute.

As for ISP's that block your ability to use other SMTP's, I personally
approach this like TV. If you are not happy with the channel you are
watching, SWITCH channels. I venture a guess that only about 2% (or far
less) of ALL users of 'personal' email need the ability to send from two or
more SMTP's. That tends to lead me to believe that this is not a "problem",
but an inconvenience to those that do not understand how ISP's operate
and/or that they have options. At home, I have a high speed ISP that allows
me access to my business SMTP.

I am no expert, and have very limited knowledge and capabilties, so please
take these comments with agrain of salt. They are simply opinions, NOT
advice.

Thank you
 

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