headers and footers in 2007


N

Nat

A co-worker of mine was having issues with footers. She resolved the issue
but had no idea how so I had her forward to me. When I take a look at this
document it has section breaks (continuous) all throughout the document and
that might be part of the document, however my question is this. When I
look at the footers, it will say header -section 1 and footer -section 1 on
page 1 then it jumps to header/footer-section 4 on pages 2 & 3 and jumps
again to header/footer-section - 6 on page 4, header/footer - section 7on
page 5, and finally header/footer - section 10 on page 6. Why does the
footer point to different sections, and how can the be undone? When I insert
a footer/header it is not tied to sections by default. Is this due to all
of these inserted section breaks?
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

Every time you insert a section break, you create a new section, and they
are numbered. If you begin a page in section 3 and have a multi-column
section in the middle (requiring two Continuous breaks), the bottom of the
page will be in section 5, and the footer reflects this (the header will be
for section 3).
 
N

Nat

Thanks so much Suzanne. That is kind of what I assumed, however, might I
ask what's the real benefit of section breaks? I can understand forcing a
new page, but am not sure about the purpose of the continuous break.
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

A section break is required whenever you change any section property. Most
of these require Next Page breaks: changes in paper size or orientation,
margins, header/footer, etc. A change in the number of columns is the most
common reasons for a Continuous break, but it can also be used to restart
line numbering, footnote numbering, or anything else that is set to "Restart
[in] each section."

Another reason for Continuous breaks would be to separate protected and
unprotected portions of a form.

If section breaks are not required, they should be removed to simplify the
document.
 

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