Getting a large screen(55 to 60 inch) monitor


T

t

The usage will be for training staff via MS-PowerPoint presentations,
spreadsheets and MS-Word documents. It has to be TV capable so that a
cable connection from Comcast will allow viewing news from Comcast as
well as ability to connect to the Internet. It also should be able to
connect to a computer/laptop for the training sessions. Panel type can
be IPS(In-Plane Switching), backlit can be white, refresh rate can be
60Hz, and 1920 X 1080 resolution should be fine for our needs(training
seminars and watching news via cable TV or browsing the Web). Budget is 2K.

1. Would monitors from common brands(LG, Samsung, Sony etc.) suffice for
our needs?

2. Will a product like LG Electronics 55LN5700 55-Inch 1080p 120Hz
LED-LCD HDTV with Smart TV
http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-55LN5700-55-Inch-LED-LCD/dp/B00BB9OPUA/
do for our need?

Or, a model like
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-KDL60EX645-60-Inch-1080p-Internet/dp/B008XG1N7M/
Sony KDL60EX645 60-Inch 1080p 120HZ Internet Slim LED HDTV (Black) would
be OK?

3. What are other factors I need to consider?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
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R

richard

The usage will be for training staff via MS-PowerPoint presentations,
spreadsheets and MS-Word documents. It has to be TV capable so that a
cable connection from Comcast will allow viewing news from Comcast as
well as ability to connect to the Internet. It also should be able to
connect to a computer/laptop for the training sessions. Panel type can
be IPS(In-Plane Switching), backlit can be white, refresh rate can be
60Hz, and 1920 X 1080 resolution should be fine for our needs(training
seminars and watching news via cable TV or browsing the Web). Budget is 2K.

1. Would monitors from common brands(LG, Samsung, Sony etc.) suffice for
our needs?

2. Will a product like LG Electronics 55LN5700 55-Inch 1080p 120Hz
LED-LCD HDTV with Smart TV
http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-55LN5700-55-Inch-LED-LCD/dp/B00BB9OPUA/
do for our need?

Or, a model like
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-KDL60EX645-60-Inch-1080p-Internet/dp/B008XG1N7M/
Sony KDL60EX645 60-Inch 1080p 120HZ Internet Slim LED HDTV (Black) would
be OK?

3. What are other factors I need to consider?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

well dude, I just set up my 55" RCA I got from walmart for half the price.
awesome.
 
P

Paul

t said:
The usage will be for training staff via MS-PowerPoint presentations,
spreadsheets and MS-Word documents. It has to be TV capable so that a
cable connection from Comcast will allow viewing news from Comcast as
well as ability to connect to the Internet. It also should be able to
connect to a computer/laptop for the training sessions. Panel type can
be IPS(In-Plane Switching), backlit can be white, refresh rate can be
60Hz, and 1920 X 1080 resolution should be fine for our needs(training
seminars and watching news via cable TV or browsing the Web). Budget is 2K.

1. Would monitors from common brands(LG, Samsung, Sony etc.) suffice for
our needs?

2. Will a product like LG Electronics 55LN5700 55-Inch 1080p 120Hz
LED-LCD HDTV with Smart TV
http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-55LN5700-55-Inch-LED-LCD/dp/B00BB9OPUA/
do for our need?

Or, a model like
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-KDL60EX645-60-Inch-1080p-Internet/dp/B008XG1N7M/
Sony KDL60EX645 60-Inch 1080p 120HZ Internet Slim LED HDTV (Black) would
be OK?

3. What are other factors I need to consider?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

You should take a look through a forum like this one.
They will review and comment on, a lot of this sort of stuff.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1132659/the-best-60-inch-pc-monitor

*******

If the viewing angle of the display is not stated, it's probably an LCD using
a TN panel. IPS has around a 178 degree viewing angle (where 180 degrees is
"perfect"). TN is less than that, maybe 160 degrees. And generally, the
vertical viewing angle is pretty bad (as you move your head up and down,
the color changes).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid-crystal_display

The main advantage of IPS is viewing angle. In a classroom setting,
it would allow students on the left and right, in the first row,
to see the same colors on the screen, as the other students are
seeing. With TN, it's possible the students would need to move
to the seats in the middle of the classroom.

The problem is, I don't know if they make large panel IPS.
It might stop with computer monitors, for all I know. And IPS
pixels are slow to respond. TN less so. But IPS might be
preferred for Photoshop work.

*******

You can get manuals.

http://www.lg.com/us/support-product/lg-55LW5700#

There is a manual and a spec sheet. It supports native 1920x1080 @ 60Hz for the PC.
("RGB (PC), HDMI (PC) supported mode"). The RGB appears to be
related to a VGA connector on the back. (They don't seem to be
able to mention VGA in polite company for some reason.)

http://www.lg.com/lgecs.downloadFil...ng.pdf&FILE_NAME=KROWM000327753.pdf&TC=DwnCmd
http://www.lg.com/us/products/documents/LG LED TV 55LW5700 Spec.pdf

*******

Richard may have been joking when he mentioned the Walmart, but
there's nothing like seeing the unit in person before purchase.
I have one home theater store in town, which has a few display
rooms with gear setup in them. In there, perhaps you can look
at the viewing angle issue, and see what you think. If there is a
TN panel based unit on display, you can walk from left to right,
and see what the students will be seeing. My home theater store
would likely have Plasma displays set up.

Also, a pet peeve about this stuff, is any store you visit,
will *always* put video on the screen. Never text. Seeing
text on the screen (like an MS Word document), shows all the
defects in the display, and is the real test. Any ole piece
of crap can display video, because the human eye is so
forgiving. Once you see text on the screen, you'll "run out
the door". (If you're desperate to review this aspect,
take a laptop and an HDMI cable with you, and ask for a
"PC mode" demo. That way, you'll be able to do dual screen
and put up text. Because otherwise, the unhelpful sales
people will pretend they have no means to put text on the
screen for comparison.)

Since the unit above (the one I checked the manuals on),
has a 1920x1080 display and supports 1920x1080 mode on
PC input, at least you won't get a fuzzy PC display due to
scaling. Earlier units, for some reason, would not
provide a 1:1 mode on PC input. They do now, and it's
something you can check for. On older units, the panel
might be 1366, and the PC input would stop at 1280,
which looked awful.

Paul
 
M

miso

If you are serious about presentations, why not get the Sony 4k TV? Oh,
and a good lock. Fry's has the Sony on display, but the demo material
sure is crappy.

There is also some throw away Chinese or Taiwanese 4k TV.
 
R

richard

I was not joking about the tv.
I had a look at the amazon units and from those prices, I'd say I got a
hell of a deal.
since mine is only a few feet away from me, I'm not all that worried about
viewing it from all angles as you would be in a class room setting.
But according to your specs for a decent one, this puppy meets them.

As for use with a PC as a monitor, it's a hell of a lot cheaper than a
dedicated monitor. I checked the prices on them and all I gotta say is,
"ripoff!".
 
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E

Evan Platt

I was not joking about the tv.

Please provide a link or model number.
I had a look at the amazon units and from those prices, I'd say I got a
hell of a deal.

Really? So your TV, at half the price, has the same specs and features
?

since mine is only a few feet away from me, I'm not all that worried about
viewing it from all angles as you would be in a class room setting.
But according to your specs for a decent one, this puppy meets them.

As for use with a PC as a monitor, it's a hell of a lot cheaper than a
dedicated monitor. I checked the prices on them and all I gotta say is,
"ripoff!".

Let's see this link. This should be good.
 
B

Bucky Breeder

richard teh retarded (NOT "Richard, the 'HEY, me NOT retarded'"
who posts as if he's in the UK) dumbassed this one :
I was not joking about the tv.
I had a look at the amazon units and from those prices, I'd say I got a
hell of a deal.
since mine is only a few feet away from me, I'm not all that worried
about viewing it from all angles as you would be in a class room
setting. But according to your specs for a decent one, this puppy meets
them.

As for use with a PC as a monitor, it's a hell of a lot cheaper than a
dedicated monitor. I checked the prices on them and all I gotta say is,
"ripoff!".


Walmart has them "on sale" because they were outlawed and recalled in
Canada because they give you eyeball cancer, occipital lobe herpes and
they have a history of bursting into flames in the middle of the night;
apparently after you turn them off and go to sleep.

"Caveat WTF, It was CHEAP!" - The mantra which keeps China in business...

--

I AM Bucky Breeder, (*(^; and ,
if "they" want to suspend, amend or add a codicil
to the 4th Amendment... Well, there's a procedure
to do that : A joint resolution and then certify it
to the states for 75% ratification - NOT
"let's open a dialog" of rationalizations and platitudes!

"All your phone calls are belong to us!" -- NSA
 
S

soup

richard said:
As for use with a PC as a monitor, it's a hell of a lot cheaper than a
dedicated monitor.

That's because it is NOT a monitor. A typical TV has nothing like the
resolution of a computer monitor . If your usage is mainly watching
DVDs, YouTube videos, that sort of thing then a TV is perfectly
adequate. However if you read a lot of text online you are better of
with a monitor as text can be difficult to read on a TV.
 
F

Ferd Berfle

G. Morgan said:
From the OP: "Budget is 2K."

Looks like a good deal @ $698

RCA 55" Class LED 1080p 120Hz HDTV, LED55B55R120Q:
a.. 55" LED panel
With 1920 x 1080 full HD resolution
b.. True 16:9 aspect ratio
View your movies as the director intended
c.. Wide 176-degree vertical and 176-degree horizontal angles
See a clear picture from anywhere in the room
d.. Built-in digital tuner
Watch digital broadcasts, including HDTV programs where available
e.. High brightness of 400 cd/m2
Get a great picture
f.. 5,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio
g.. HDMI Inputs: 4
Enjoy a superior HD experience with HDMI one-cable solution
h.. 54.6" screen measured diagonally from corner to corner
 
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P

Paul

Ferd said:
Looks like a good deal @ $698

RCA 55" Class LED 1080p 120Hz HDTV, LED55B55R120Q:
a.. 55" LED panel
With 1920 x 1080 full HD resolution
b.. True 16:9 aspect ratio
View your movies as the director intended
c.. Wide 176-degree vertical and 176-degree horizontal angles
See a clear picture from anywhere in the room
d.. Built-in digital tuner
Watch digital broadcasts, including HDTV programs where available
e.. High brightness of 400 cd/m2
Get a great picture
f.. 5,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio
g.. HDMI Inputs: 4
Enjoy a superior HD experience with HDMI one-cable solution
h.. 54.6" screen measured diagonally from corner to corner

http://reviews.walmart.com/1336/206...-ultra-slim-led55b55r120q-reviews/reviews.htm

"Great picture for a portrait but not motion.

The colors are vibrant and its super thin ill give it that but when the
objects or people move during a movie or show they blur every time.
"

So perhaps the 176 degree viewing angle, comes at the price of
response speed (like, if the panel was a member of the IPS
in-plane-switching panel types).

The listed response time for it is "Response Time: 4.5ms".
Which could be GTG.

It would likely be great for the "MS-PowerPoint presentations",
less so for watching Comcast.

If they had it in-store to look at, that would be great too.
Just to see what the money can buy you.

*******

http://www.target.com/p/lg-55-class-1080p-120hz-led-smart-hdtv-black-55ln5700/-/A-14491527

Response Time: 1ms Response Time

They could have made that up though, because that info is not
listed on the LG site. No way for me to verify it. Amazing to
have to go to Target, to find out.

Most specs for LCDs are formulated to be dishonest, so I
wouldn't read too much into that number. That's why an
in-person appraisal is important, because you really
cannot rely on simple numbers, to tell you whether
the thing "makes people blur". It could be the
blur comes from the picture processing chip inside
the unit, rather than being a panel artifact. Some
picture processor chips, overdo it, and add all sorts
of artifacts, depending on input content.

*******

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1444311/official-sony-kdl60ex645-thread/150

"A concern since purchasing the 60ex645 has been effective viewing
angle. Our sitting position is about 15 feet away from the screen.
So, I placed a call to Sony support. I mentioned the picture quality
degrading a lot as I stepped left or right of the edge of the screen
while standing about 10 feet away. So, I asked if anything could be
done (knew the answer to that one) and at what value does the PQ
start falling off. Surprisingly (?), he didn't know the answer to
either and I found myself on hold for about 5 minutes. When he
returned, he said that degrading would occur at about 15 degrees
offset from either the right or left of the screen and that the
value would stay relatively consistent. So, if my h.s. trig doesn't
fail me, tangent of 15 degrees is 0.267, so at 10 feet from the
screen, it will start looking degraded starting at 2.67 feet from
either right/left edge. At 15 feet, 4 feet, etc. No wonder, the
wife is grumbling."

So much for the "viewing angle 88/88", which is 176 degrees. Viewing
angle is defined for a 10:1 reduction in intensity, so is seriously
degraded looking edge on at the screen (duh). But the reviewers comment
above, suggests it's worse than that, if it is that noticeable.

http://static.highspeedbackbone.net/pdf/Sony KDL60EX645 Internet LED HDTV Data Sheet.pdf

Still can't find a response time for that one.

You can spend hours doing these checks... The nice thing is,
there's always an honest person waiting in the wings, to give
the low-down.

Paul
 
E

Evan Platt

The OP's budget is $2000, half of that is $1000 - not $500.

Oh.

Well I was assuming richard meant the op's link to a amazon listing
for a $1062 TV. - Half of which would be $1000.

Regardless, I'm sure bullis's TV doesn't match the specs.

But, since bullis has vanished in a cloud of dust, as usual, we'll
never know what he was thinking.
 
E

Evan Platt

Well I was assuming richard meant the op's link to a amazon listing
for a $1062 TV. - Half of which would be $1000.

That's what I get for posting when I should have been asleep LOL.
 
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B

Bucky Breeder

G. Morgan practiced for the SATs thusly :
From the OP: "Budget is 2K."

I got my 60" LG from Walmart for $199.95.

It was on the pallet in the middle of the aisle in front of
the Electronics department. They had quite a few left, if
anyone is interested.

--

I AM Bucky Breeder, (*(^;
and For All You Ladies (FATL:) :
I *AM* The Original Pompatus of Love! Therefore,
I can speak the sweet words of epismetology into your ears
and spank you with the magnanimousness of genetic's generosities.

(But... my real name is NOT "Maurice".)
 
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T

t

You should take a look through a forum like this one.
They will review and comment on, a lot of this sort of stuff.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1132659/the-best-60-inch-pc-monitor

*******

If the viewing angle of the display is not stated, it's probably an LCD
using
a TN panel. IPS has around a 178 degree viewing angle (where 180 degrees is
"perfect"). TN is less than that, maybe 160 degrees. And generally, the
vertical viewing angle is pretty bad (as you move your head up and down,
the color changes).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid-crystal_display

The main advantage of IPS is viewing angle. In a classroom setting,
it would allow students on the left and right, in the first row,
to see the same colors on the screen, as the other students are
seeing. With TN, it's possible the students would need to move
to the seats in the middle of the classroom.

The problem is, I don't know if they make large panel IPS.
It might stop with computer monitors, for all I know. And IPS
pixels are slow to respond. TN less so. But IPS might be
preferred for Photoshop work.

*******

You can get manuals.

http://www.lg.com/us/support-product/lg-55LW5700#

There is a manual and a spec sheet. It supports native 1920x1080 @ 60Hz
for the PC.
("RGB (PC), HDMI (PC) supported mode"). The RGB appears to be
related to a VGA connector on the back. (They don't seem to be
able to mention VGA in polite company for some reason.)

http://www.lg.com/lgecs.downloadFil...ng.pdf&FILE_NAME=KROWM000327753.pdf&TC=DwnCmd

http://www.lg.com/us/products/documents/LG LED TV 55LW5700 Spec.pdf

*******

Richard may have been joking when he mentioned the Walmart, but
there's nothing like seeing the unit in person before purchase.
I have one home theater store in town, which has a few display
rooms with gear setup in them. In there, perhaps you can look
at the viewing angle issue, and see what you think. If there is a
TN panel based unit on display, you can walk from left to right,
and see what the students will be seeing. My home theater store
would likely have Plasma displays set up.

Also, a pet peeve about this stuff, is any store you visit,
will *always* put video on the screen. Never text. Seeing
text on the screen (like an MS Word document), shows all the
defects in the display, and is the real test. Any ole piece
of crap can display video, because the human eye is so
forgiving. Once you see text on the screen, you'll "run out
the door". (If you're desperate to review this aspect,
take a laptop and an HDMI cable with you, and ask for a
"PC mode" demo. That way, you'll be able to do dual screen
and put up text. Because otherwise, the unhelpful sales
people will pretend they have no means to put text on the
screen for comparison.)

Since the unit above (the one I checked the manuals on),
has a 1920x1080 display and supports 1920x1080 mode on
PC input, at least you won't get a fuzzy PC display due to
scaling. Earlier units, for some reason, would not
provide a 1:1 mode on PC input. They do now, and it's
something you can check for. On older units, the panel
might be 1366, and the PC input would stop at 1280,
which looked awful.

Paul
Thanks Paul,

I appreciate the advice.

P.S. I posted this message weeks ago, but it did not appear before so
re-posting it.
 

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