frequencies, frequencies...


O

Osiris

I have this old Celeron 500Mz computer.
In the BIOS there is a setting
"Host CPU/DIMM/PCI: ". set to default, whatever that is...
Behind this there is a list of options, 17 in number, that looks like
this:
66/100/33
68/102/34
..
..
..
125/125/41
133/100/33
..
..
..
155/155/38

What is the correct choice here ?


Some data Sandra2007 gives me:
Measured speed/FSB : 335MHz / 1x 67MHz
Multiplier : 5/1x
Supported speeds : 800MHz+

Chipset 1
Model : Intel Corporation 82810 810 Chipset Memory Controller Hub
Bus(ses) : ISA PCI USB i2c/SMBus
'Front Side Bus' Speed : 1x 100MHz (100MHz data rate)
Maximum FSB Speed / Max memory speed : 1x 100MHz / 1x 100MHz
Datawidth : 64-bit
'IO Queue Depth' : 4 requests

Chipset 1 Hub Interface
Type : Hub-Interface
DataWIDTH : 8-bit
Full Duplex : yes
Multiplier : 2/1x
SPEED : 4x 66MHz (264MHz data rate)

LogiCAL/Chipset 1 MEMORY Banken
Bank 0 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 1 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 2 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 3 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
sHARED MEMORY : 1MB
DatawIDTH : 64-bit
Memory Controller in Processor : nONE
'Refresh Rate' : 15.60µs
'Power Save' Modus : none
'Fixed Hole' available : none

memory module 1 and 2
Type : 256MB SDRAM
Technology : 16x(16Mx8)
Speed : PC133U 3-3-3-5
Choose Timing @ 133MHz : 3-3-3-5
Choose Timing @ 100MHz : 2-2-2-6

PCI Bus(ses) On Hub 1
Version : 2.10
nr of 'Bridges' : 1
PCI Bus 0 : PCI (33MHz)
PCI Bus 1 : PCI (33MHz)
Multiplier : 1/3x
 
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P

Paul

I have this old Celeron 500Mz computer.
In the BIOS there is a setting
"Host CPU/DIMM/PCI: ". set to default, whatever that is...
Behind this there is a list of options, 17 in number, that looks like
this:
66/100/33
68/102/34
.
.
.
125/125/41
133/100/33
.
.
.
155/155/38

What is the correct choice here ?


Some data Sandra2007 gives me:
Measured speed/FSB : 335MHz / 1x 67MHz
Multiplier : 5/1x
Supported speeds : 800MHz+

Chipset 1
Model : Intel Corporation 82810 810 Chipset Memory Controller Hub
Bus(ses) : ISA PCI USB i2c/SMBus
'Front Side Bus' Speed : 1x 100MHz (100MHz data rate)
Maximum FSB Speed / Max memory speed : 1x 100MHz / 1x 100MHz
Datawidth : 64-bit
'IO Queue Depth' : 4 requests

Chipset 1 Hub Interface
Type : Hub-Interface
DataWIDTH : 8-bit
Full Duplex : yes
Multiplier : 2/1x
SPEED : 4x 66MHz (264MHz data rate)

LogiCAL/Chipset 1 MEMORY Banken
Bank 0 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 1 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 2 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
Bank 3 : 128MB SDRAM 2-3-3-0
sHARED MEMORY : 1MB
DatawIDTH : 64-bit
Memory Controller in Processor : nONE
'Refresh Rate' : 15.60µs
'Power Save' Modus : none
'Fixed Hole' available : none

memory module 1 and 2
Type : 256MB SDRAM
Technology : 16x(16Mx8)
Speed : PC133U 3-3-3-5
Choose Timing @ 133MHz : 3-3-3-5
Choose Timing @ 100MHz : 2-2-2-6

PCI Bus(ses) On Hub 1
Version : 2.10
nr of 'Bridges' : 1
PCI Bus 0 : PCI (33MHz)
PCI Bus 1 : PCI (33MHz)
Multiplier : 1/3x

The choices are probably CPU/memory/PCI clock.

Your Celeron is 500MHz with multiplier 5. The CPU is 100Mhz.
Your memory is rated for up to 133MHz. PCI should be 33MHz.

Best choice 100/133/33 (everything full speed)
Second best choice 100/100/33 (memory in sync with CPU)

You can benchmark with the various choices, and see which
option is better. A test like SuperPI would be fun.

http://www.xtremesystems.com/pi/super_pi_mod-1.5.zip

Now, this page says the first 810 ran FSB100 and PC100 max.
But the BIOS options offered should be valid for whatever
revision of 810 you've got.

http://developer.intel.com/design/chipsets/mature/index.htm

Paul
 
K

kony

66/100 is the correct choice. 66MHz is the FSB of a Celeron
500 (actually all celerons until 800MHz and higher, till the
P4 era). The 100MHz is memory bus speed, it is good to have
that at asynchronous +33 mode because your system has the
810 integrated video.

IF you wanted to slightlyoverclock the system you could
raise the FSB:Mem to 68/102, such a slight increase is quite
likely to be stable without any further system changes, but
on the other hand, it's such a minor increase that it's
hardly worth doing- as you should still (re)test stability
after making such a chance, like with Memtest86 for several
hours then Prime95's Torture Test.

The choices are probably CPU/memory/PCI clock.

Your Celeron is 500MHz with multiplier 5. The CPU is 100Mhz.

See above.

Your memory is rated for up to 133MHz. PCI should be 33MHz.

IIRC, 810 could only do +33 (max.) async bus so it's 100MHz
max, unless overclocking.
 
O

Osiris

hm, may not have been a good idea:
Now the comp doesn't boot at all....
Any way to reset the thing again ?
 
P

pen

hm, may not have been a good idea:
Now the comp doesn't boot at all....
Any way to reset the thing again ?
There may be a BIOS reset jumper and you can always remove the BIOS
battery
and leave it out for 5 minutes to reset the BIOS to defaults.
 
K

kony

hm, may not have been a good idea:
Now the comp doesn't boot at all....
Any way to reset the thing again ?


Unplug AC, then use the clear CMOS jumper or pull the
battery for a few minutes. This should reset to default
values.

Now the odd question: Given that these boards default to
running the Celeron at the right speed, and that it showed
up as a Celeron 500, IE- 500MHz, why did you feel the need
to change things?

This is another case where you should not fool around with
sandra, just leave the system alone. I'm not trying to be
harsh, but you seem to be operating with the impression that
things aren't right when there's no evidence of a problem.
 
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O

Osiris

Unplug AC, then use the clear CMOS jumper or pull the
battery for a few minutes. This should reset to default
values.

Now the odd question: Given that these boards default to
running the Celeron at the right speed, and that it showed
up as a Celeron 500, IE- 500MHz, why did you feel the need
to change things?

This is another case where you should not fool around with
sandra, just leave the system alone. I'm not trying to be
harsh, but you seem to be operating with the impression that
things aren't right when there's no evidence of a problem.

You could be right, but seeing the machine start up, I had the strong
impression that it was DEAD SLOW.
I could not find any reason for that in WinXP, so I went further...

These boards find the right speed by them selves ? hm, ok. thnx.
More news later.
thnx so far.
 
K

kony

You could be right, but seeing the machine start up, I had the strong
impression that it was DEAD SLOW.
I could not find any reason for that in WinXP, so I went further...

It's a Celeron 500, using integrated video from a 100MHz
async memory bus... of course it's slow at XP... but, it
could be something else like the system not using DMA for
HDD(s).

These boards find the right speed by them selves ? hm, ok. thnx.
More news later.
thnx so far.


Any board from the slot 1 or skt 370 era only goes as low as
66MHz. Well I might have been too quick to write that,
there might be some rare early board that could do 50MHz FSB
but not by default, they always default to 66MHz if not
sensing the FSB pins of the CPU... so at least for a Celeron
under 800MHz, the FSB will be right until changed.

There were boards with FSB jumpers as well as bios settings,
but these weren't so common on i810 boards, it was mostly a
platform targeted at OEMs or office use, neither category
being one that favors user adjustments of the system.

The multiplier on the CPU is locked... no board can change
it except on very rare engineering sample CPUs and we can
assume you don't have one unless it was obtained in an
unusual, obvious way to get one.
 
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O

Osiris

So, what do you think fixed it ? Clearing the CMOS,
or some setting you made ?

Too bad you didn't have before and after info using
a util like CPUZ, as that could tell you a bit about
what was messed up.

http://www.cpuid.com/download/cpu-z-135.zip

Paul

removed battery for 5 mins.
well, solved, ok... I dunno, but the thing works again...
before/after data... the before is no problem, but the after is not
possible, if the thing doesn't even get through the BIOS...
Don't thing CPUZ or any prog at all would help out here, would it ?
 
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