favorite folders


C

Caryl

OL 2003, Windows XP home, SP3

Some of my Favorite Folders disappeared so I right clicked on them in
All Mail Folders. However, when I close and then reopen Outlook the
new folders are not in the Favorite Folders area.

I noticed that it was suggested to use Start/Run: OUTLOOK.EXE /
resetnavpane for this problem, so I tried this twice and all I got was
two more lists of Personal Folders under All Mail Folders.

How can I get the Favorite Folders to remain and can I delete the two
new Personal Folders, or will that delete all my personal folders?

Thank you.

Caryl
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Caryl

Can someone please help me recover my Favorite Files. Another site
said to delete the XML file. However, I cannot find it. I followed the
path where it should be and there were only three items: Extend (a
video CD move), an Outlook text document (1kb), and the Outlook Data
file. Start/Search showed that there is a 5KB XML document there.

Please help. Thanks.
 
C

Caryl

I solved the problem by doing a system restore to yesterday's date.
After doing that I opened Outlook again and I had no Favorite Files at
all. So I brought both the folders that are normally there and the few
that I elect to have there to the Favorite Files area and this time
after I closed and reopened Outlook they were still all there.
 
B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

Can someone please help me recover my Favorite Files. Another site
said to delete the XML file. However, I cannot find it. I followed the
path where it should be and there were only three items: Extend (a
video CD move), an Outlook text document (1kb), and the Outlook Data
file. Start/Search showed that there is a 5KB XML document there.

You perhaps still have the option to view hidden files and folders disabled
and you have hiding of known file types enabled. The file "Extend" is
"extend.dat", so you must have ".dat" files associated with an application
that views video files. The "Outlook Data File" is your PST, with the file
type ".pst". It's hard to say what the text file is. Use Notepad to look at
what it contains. Outlook doesn't use text files particularly.
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Caryl

You perhaps still have the option to view hidden files and folders disabled
and you have hiding of known file types enabled.  The file "Extend" is
"extend.dat", so you must have ".dat" files associated with an application
that views video files.  The "Outlook Data File" is your PST, with the file
type ".pst".  It's hard to say what the text file is.  Use Notepad tolook at
what it contains.  Outlook doesn't use text files particularly.

Thanks for responding, Brian.

"Show hidden files and folders" is checked in Window Explorer/Tools/
Folder Options/View. Although I do not need it now, I would like to
find the XML file in case I need it in the future. Any other ideas how
I can do that?

The .dat file is a 968 bytes video CD movie which indicates that it
opens with Nero ShowTime. However, it would not open with this
program. Nero has been having problems recently so I have not been
using it. Should I just leave the file where it is?

I know what the .pst file is, and I have backed it up previsouly.

The text file is:

Microsoft (R) Inbox Repair Tool
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1995-1996. All rights reserved.

**Beginning NDB recovery

Attempting to...

Is there any reason for me to keep this file?

Thanks again for your help.
 
B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

"Show hidden files and folders" is checked in Window Explorer/Tools/
Folder Options/View. Although I do not need it now, I would like to
find the XML file in case I need it in the future. Any other ideas how
I can do that?

It's in %AppData%\Microsoft\Outlook
The .dat file is a 968 bytes video CD movie which indicates that it
opens with Nero ShowTime. However, it would not open with this
program. Nero has been having problems recently so I have not been
using it. Should I just leave the file where it is?

It's not really a video file. You just have Nero ShowTime associated with DAT
files. Outlook doesn't care. If you delete this file with Outlook closed,
Outlook will just create a new one the next time you run it.
The text file is:

Microsoft (R) Inbox Repair Tool
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1995-1996. All rights reserved.

It appears to be just a log of a prior run of SCANPST.EXE. It is safe to
delete.
 
C

Caryl

It's in %AppData%\Microsoft\Outlook

I found it there. Which brings me to another question. Outlook Data
File is also there with 19 KB. However, when I add Local Settings and
then go to Application Data/Microsoft/Outlook, I find the three files
I mentioned earlier. The Outlook Data File is 1.26 GB. I know that
this one is the one to be backed up, but what is the smaller data
file?

Thank you.
 
B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

I found it there. Which brings me to another question. Outlook Data
File is also there with 19 KB. However, when I add Local Settings and
then go to Application Data/Microsoft/Outlook, I find the three files
I mentioned earlier. The Outlook Data File is 1.26 GB. I know that
this one is the one to be backed up, but what is the smaller data
file?


%UserProfile%\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook is the default
folder Outlook uses when you create a new PST. If you see more than one PST
there, you created them there at some point. If one of them is named
"Archive.PST", then Outlook's AutoArchive feature created it. It is unusual
to see PSTs in %AppData%\Microsoft\Outlook, but Outlook really doesn't care
where you locate a PST. For example, I keep mine in "My Documents\Outlook
Files". As long as you have permission to create files in the folder and as
long as when you do, the file you create allows you read/write permissions,
then you can create the PST in that folder.
 
C

Caryl

"Caryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
%UserProfile%\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook is the default
folder Outlook uses when you create a new PST.  If you see more than one PST
there, you created them there at some point.  If one of them is named
"Archive.PST", then Outlook's AutoArchive feature created it.  It is unusual
to see PSTs in %AppData%\Microsoft\Outlook, but Outlook really doesn't care
where you locate a PST.  For example, I keep mine in "My Documents\Outlook
Files".  As long as you have permission to create files in the folder and as
long as when you do, the file you create allows you read/write permissions,
then you can create the PST in that folder.

Brian,

I have one more question regarding this. Thanks for being so patient
with me. Since the large PST file is in the default folder User Profile
\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook, can I just delete
the small (19 KB) PST file that is in Application Data/Microsoft/
Outlook?

Actually, I have a second question. Since you brought up the archive
PST file, what is the advantage of archving files if Outlook works
well without doing that. If I do archive, do I just open the archive
file that is in the Outlook default folder if I need something in it?
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

I have one more question regarding this. Thanks for being so patient
with me. Since the large PST file is in the default folder User Profile
\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook, can I just delete
the small (19 KB) PST file that is in Application Data/Microsoft/
Outlook?

19KB should be too small for a viable PST. As long at it doesn't show in the
Data Files section of your mail profile, you can delete it, provided it
contains nothing of value to you. Open it in Outlook and see.
Actually, I have a second question. Since you brought up the archive
PST file, what is the advantage of archving files if Outlook works
well without doing that. If I do archive, do I just open the archive
file that is in the Outlook default folder if I need something in it?

Using AutoArchivre allows you to keep your main folder set organized with only
those items you find of current value. Older items you wish to keep for
historical reasons but do not need to be active can be archived. They're
available when you need them by opening the file, but they're not part of your
day-to-day information. In versions of Outlook prior to 2003, archiving was
more often necessary in order to keep the size of the PST below its 2GB limit.
WIth current Outlook versions, archiving due to size is much less a
requirement, but systems analysis shows that people have a harder time keeping
track of a large number of items, so archiving is handy for organizational
purposes.
 
Ad

Advertisements

W

wangdong

You can try a popular Outlook recovery tool called Advanced Outlook
Repair to repair your PST file. It is a powerful tool to recover
messages, folders and other objects from corrupt or damaged Microsoft
Outlook PST files.

Detailed information about Advanced Outlook Repair can be found at
http://www.datanumen.com/aor/

And you can also download a free demo version at http://www.datanumen.com/aor/aor.exe
Good luck!
Wangdong
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top