Dual-Boot Issue; XP Pro ---> Vista


G

Guest

I'm currently running XP Pro on a laptop and I got a copy of Vista Business
from my school. What I did to install it was create an extended partition on
my hard drive and create a new V: partition. When I booted to the Vista dvd
and installed it, things went fine until it tries to restart and boot up
Vista. Right after choosing Vista from the boot list I get a screen that
says:

File: \Windows\system32\winload.exe
Status: 0xc0000001
Info: The selected entry could not be loaded because the application is
missing or corrupt.

I've tried repairing and reinstalling several times while tweaking this or
that with no success. One thing that I've noticed that seems strange is that
when I boot from the dvd and access the repair console, the drive letters in
the bcd differ from what they are in EasyBCD. Here is what EasyBCD reads:

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier {bootmgr}
device partition=C:
description Windows Boot Manager
locale en-US
inherit {globalsettings}
default {default}
displayorder {ntldr}
{default}
toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
timeout 3

Windows Legacy OS Loader
------------------------
identifier {ntldr}
device partition=C:
path \ntldr
description Windows XP Professional

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {default}
device partition=V:
path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
description Microsoft Windows Vista
locale en-US
inherit {bootloadersettings}
osdevice partition=V:
systemroot \Windows
resumeobject {0309b979-0a8e-11dc-92eb-87a75f4a0752}
nx OptIn
detecthal Yes

Any help or suggestions would be great.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Inzer

tarheels said:
I'm currently running XP Pro on a laptop and I got a copy of Vista
Business from my school. What I did to install it was create an
extended partition on my hard drive and create a new V: partition.
When I booted to the Vista dvd and installed it, things went fine
until it tries to restart and boot up Vista. Right after choosing
Vista from the boot list I get a screen that says:

File: \Windows\system32\winload.exe
Status: 0xc0000001
Info: The selected entry could not be loaded because the application
is missing or corrupt.

I've tried repairing and reinstalling several times while tweaking
this or that with no success. One thing that I've noticed that seems
strange is that when I boot from the dvd and access the repair
console, the drive letters in the bcd differ from what they are in
EasyBCD. Here is what EasyBCD reads:

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier {bootmgr}
device partition=C:
description Windows Boot Manager
locale en-US
inherit {globalsettings}
default {default}
displayorder {ntldr}
{default}
toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
timeout 3

Windows Legacy OS Loader
------------------------
identifier {ntldr}
device partition=C:
path \ntldr
description Windows XP Professional

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {default}
device partition=V:
path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
description Microsoft Windows Vista
locale en-US
inherit {bootloadersettings}
osdevice partition=V:
systemroot \Windows
resumeobject {0309b979-0a8e-11dc-92eb-87a75f4a0752}
nx OptIn
detecthal Yes

Any help or suggestions would be great.
========================
I don't know exactly what is causing the
issue you describe but I do know that
Vista installs best if you allow it to create
it's own partition.

Maybe some of the following info will
be useful:

You may need to reduce the size of
your Primary Active partition to create
some unallocated space.

I used Acronis Disk Director Suite 10
to accomplish this but there are other
options such as the app. mentioned
in the following article.

How to dual-boot Vista with XP -
step-by-step guide with screenshots
http://tinyurl.com/ysh8hy

Gnome Partition Editor
http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

Once you have the unallocated space
available...you may need to enter your
BIOS and change the boot order so
you can boot from the Vista disk. From
that point just follow the onscreen
instructions.

The following links may be useful also:

Dual-Booting Vista and XP
http://www.windowstalk.org/dual_boot_vista.htm

Dual-Booting Vista and XP (Part 2)
http://www.windowstalk.org/dual_boot_part2.htm

VistaBootPRO
http://www.vistabootpro.org/index.php


--

John Inzer
MS Picture It! -
Digital Image MVP

Digital Image
Highlights and FAQs
http://tinyurl.com/aczzp

Notice
This is not tech support
I am a volunteer

Solutions that work for
me may not work for you

Proceed at your own risk
 
G

Guest

Ok, I tried what you said. I deleted the partition that I had installed
Vista on and then booted to the Vista dvd and did the install to the
unallocated space. I got the same error again on restart. I've read before
the first guide that you posted and I feel like I've done exactly what it
says to do.

One strange thing I've noticed is during install it acts like it already has
all of the install files ready. It goes to the "expanding files" stage after
only a few seconds.
 
J

John Inzer

tarheels said:
Ok, I tried what you said. I deleted the partition that I had
installed Vista on and then booted to the Vista dvd and did the
install to the unallocated space. I got the same error again on
restart. I've read before the first guide that you posted and I feel
like I've done exactly what it says to do.

One strange thing I've noticed is during install it acts like it
already has all of the install files ready. It goes to the
"expanding files" stage after only a few seconds.
================================
Sorry...I thought it was worth a try.

--

John Inzer
MS Picture It! -
Digital Image MVP

Digital Image
Highlights and FAQs
http://tinyurl.com/aczzp

Notice
This is not tech support
I am a volunteer

Solutions that work for
me may not work for you

Proceed at your own risk
 
G

Guest

John Inzer said:
================================
Sorry...I thought it was worth a try.

--

John Inzer
MS Picture It! -
Digital Image MVP

Digital Image
Highlights and FAQs
http://tinyurl.com/aczzp

Notice
This is not tech support
I am a volunteer

Solutions that work for
me may not work for you

Proceed at your own risk

Hey, at least I got a response. Thanks anyway!
 
D

Don

tarheels said:
I'm currently running XP Pro on a laptop and I got a copy of Vista Business
from my school. What I did to install it was create an extended partition on
my hard drive and create a new V: partition...

Makes a huge difference how the new partition was created and
(especially) formatted. If this was done from inside XP then that may
be the source of your problems. The surest way is to let the Vista
installer do both chores.
 
Ad

Advertisements

X

XS11E

Don said:
Makes a huge difference how the new partition was created and
(especially) formatted. If this was done from inside XP then that
may be the source of your problems. The surest way is to let the
Vista installer do both chores.

Hmmm, I didn't know that?

I installed XP onto a clean harddrive. After it finished, I used the
disk management tool to partition the remainder of the drive and
formatted each partition as NTFS.

Next, I installed Vista Ultimate 64 on one of the partitions and had no
problems at all with the installation, Vista and XP dual boot with no
problems. I'm wondering what problems have others had, was I just
lucky?
 
G

Guest

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier {bootmgr}
device partition=C:
description Windows Boot Manager
locale en-US
inherit {globalsettings}
default {default}
displayorder {ntldr}
{default}
toolsdisplayorder {memdiag}
timeout 3

Windows Legacy OS Loader
------------------------
identifier {ntldr}
device partition=C:
path \ntldr
description Windows XP Professional

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {default}
device partition=V:
path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
description Microsoft Windows Vista
locale en-US
inherit {bootloadersettings}
osdevice partition=V:
systemroot \Windows
resumeobject {0309b979-0a8e-11dc-92eb-87a75f4a0752}
nx OptIn
detecthal Yes

Bcd log indicated that your vista partition is V:, to launch vista, you
could try these command in WinRE mode, type following command.
bcdedit /set {default} device partition=V:
bcdedit /set {default} path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
 
G

Guest

Don said:
Makes a huge difference how the new partition was created and
(especially) formatted. If this was done from inside XP then that may
be the source of your problems. The surest way is to let the Vista
installer do both chores.

I've tried lots of different ways of formatting the partition. I've
formatted it through XP and through Vista. I've also tried installing to
unallocated space. I'm not aware of any other way of doing it.
 
G

Guest

Bcd log indicated that your vista partition is V:, to launch vista, you
could try these command in WinRE mode, type following command.
bcdedit /set {default} device partition=V:
bcdedit /set {default} path \Windows\system32\winload.exe

By WinRE do you mean the recovery environment available when Vista is booted
from the dvd?
 
D

Don

XS11E said:
Hmmm, I didn't know that?

I installed XP onto a clean harddrive. After it finished, I used the
disk management tool to partition the remainder of the drive and
formatted each partition as NTFS.

Next, I installed Vista Ultimate 64 on one of the partitions and had no
problems at all with the installation, Vista and XP dual boot with no
problems. I'm wondering what problems have others had, was I just
lucky?

I have no experience with Vista-64, so I can only speculate. But I
do know that there are some subtle additions to Vista's NTFS that XP
doesn't know about. (Junctions, just for one.)

I originally installed Vista by creating *and* formatting a new NTFS
partition from XP, and then using the Vista DVD to install to the
new partition. It worked well for several hours while I installed
the latest Vista updates from MS -- then I tried to install firefox
and the whole system crashed and left the filesystem trashed beyond
recovery.

When I reinstalled Vista I let the installer create and format its
own partition and I've no trouble ever since. Just anecdotal evidence,
yes, but it convinced me.
 
Ad

Advertisements

X

XS11E

Don said:
I originally installed Vista by creating *and* formatting a new
NTFS partition from XP, and then using the Vista DVD to install to
the new partition.
Ditto.

It worked well for several hours while I installed the latest
Vista updates from MS -- then I tried to install firefox and the
whole system crashed and left the filesystem trashed beyond
recovery.

About what I did but I had no problems.
When I reinstalled Vista I let the installer create and format its
own partition and I've no trouble ever since. Just anecdotal
evidence, yes, but it convinced me.

I'm not convinced, I suspect some other problem caused your crash, not
the formatting of the partition but there's no way to know for sure..
 
C

CZ

Don: > Makes a huge difference how the new partition was created and
(especially) formatted. If this was done from inside XP then that
may be the source of your problems. The surest way is to let the
Vista installer do both chores.

XS11E: Hmmm, I didn't know that?

I installed XP onto a clean harddrive. After it finished, I used the
disk management tool to partition the remainder of the drive and
formatted each partition as NTFS.

Next, I installed Vista Ultimate 64 on one of the partitions and had no
problems at all with the installation, Vista and XP dual boot with no
problems. I'm wondering what problems have others had, was I just
lucky?

XS11E:

IMO, Don's comment is incorrect. I have done several Vista x86 installs
into vols created and formatted by XP.
Never had a problem.
 
X

XS11E

CZ said:
Don: > Makes a huge difference how the new partition was created
and

XS11E: Hmmm, I didn't know that?

I installed XP onto a clean harddrive. After it finished, I used
the disk management tool to partition the remainder of the drive
and formatted each partition as NTFS.

Next, I installed Vista Ultimate 64 on one of the partitions and
had no problems at all with the installation, Vista and XP dual
boot with no problems. I'm wondering what problems have others
had, was I just lucky?

XS11E:

IMO, Don's comment is incorrect. I have done several Vista x86
installs into vols created and formatted by XP.
Never had a problem.

I'm sure most have done it that way but I wouldn't call his comment
incorrect, it must have caused some kind of problem on his machine or
he wouldn't have said that, would he?

I'd like to know just what problem(s) he had.
 
D

Don

XS11E said:
I'm sure most have done it that way but I wouldn't call his comment
incorrect, it must have caused some kind of problem on his machine or
he wouldn't have said that, would he?

I'd like to know just what problem(s) he had.

Sorry, I thought I'd already mentioned the catastrophic system crash
while trying to install mozilla-firefox. I confess I don't have any
proof that this crash was caused by using XP to format the Vista
partition, but I later did the same steps with no problems after
letting Vista format its own partition during the second install.

As far as I can recall, the formatting was the only thing I changed
when I reinstalled Vista. Not exactly rigorous proof -- but I am
convinced that Black Magic also plays an important role in every
computer geek's life, so that offers a plausible alternative theory.

I really do recall reading (somewhere) that XP should not be used
to do any sort of manipulation of a Vista filesystem, e.g. checking
it for errors or repairing it.

We would all welcome comments from someone who actually knows the
facts, certainly.
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

CZ

I really do recall reading (somewhere) that XP should not be used
to do any sort of manipulation of a Vista filesystem, e.g. checking
it for errors or repairing it.

Don:

I use XP's defragger on Vista vols w/o any problems
 
X

XS11E

Don said:
Sorry, I thought I'd already mentioned the catastrophic system
crash while trying to install mozilla-firefox.

Thanks for the info.
I confess I don't have any proof that this crash was caused by
using XP to format the Vista partition, but I later did the same
steps with no problems after letting Vista format its own
partition during the second install.

As far as I can recall, the formatting was the only thing I
changed when I reinstalled Vista. Not exactly rigorous proof --
but I am convinced that Black Magic also plays an important role
in every computer geek's life, so that offers a plausible
alternative theory.

OK, I don't think the formatting is what did it but who knows?
We would all welcome comments from someone who actually knows the
facts, certainly.

OK, facts: Diamondbacks beat Phillies 4-3 last night. I know other
facts but to me, that's the most important right now. ;-)
 
Ad

Advertisements

X

XS11E

Don said:
That's good to know, but why not use Vista's defragger?

Some (like me) don't like and won't use Vista's defragger because it
won't tell you what it's doing nor what it's done.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top