Drive letter manipulation


A

anonymous

Microsoft Windows SP3 XP [Version 5.1.2600]

I need some suggestions on the reassignment of drive letters.

Explanation:

Assume for the moment that no reserve drive letters exist.

I have a USB external drive that was partitioned as A - E.
I have a USB external drive that is accessed as F.

The A - E drive(s) are used in a backup rotation. Unfortu-
nately, the backup requirements have begun to exhaust the
available allocations of A - E.

Additionally, F contains only user data. "Many" internal
references exist specifically describing F, throughout
the system.

When I reformat/unpartition A -E, F will be dropped back
to B. Obviously, this will negatively affect all the previous
F references.

So, I need a way to "direct" all the F references to the
relocated B, so I don't have to manually change the F
references to B.

I have been reviewing DOS commands, specifically the
"assign". But assign is removed from this system.in the
favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,
while honored, produces no return information. And, the
command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions
involving my need.

Assuming I located a "reroute" command, I could insert
something like "reroute F to B" inside my autoexec file,
and the new drive assignment would be permanently
resolved at each system inirialization.

Is something like:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2131593_assign-drive-letter-usb-drive.html
what I need? Or, maybe something like:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl...ic.windowsxp.general/PK1AWfNF4f4/bWAe60xvmW0J

Unlike these similar postings, my USB drives are never
detached/reattached.

Confirmations/ideas?

Thanks,

Gary
 
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T

Tim Rude

Microsoft Windows SP3 XP [Version 5.1.2600]

I need some suggestions on the reassignment of drive letters.

Explanation:

Assume for the moment that no reserve drive letters exist.

I have a USB external drive that was partitioned as A - E.
I have a USB external drive that is accessed as F.

The A - E drive(s) are used in a backup rotation. Unfortu-
nately, the backup requirements have begun to exhaust the
available allocations of A - E.

Additionally, F contains only user data. "Many" internal
references exist specifically describing F, throughout
the system.

When I reformat/unpartition A -E, F will be dropped back
to B. Obviously, this will negatively affect all the previous
F references.

So, I need a way to "direct" all the F references to the
relocated B, so I don't have to manually change the F
references to B.

I have been reviewing DOS commands, specifically the
"assign". But assign is removed from this system.in the
favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,
while honored, produces no return information. And, the
command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions
involving my need.

Assuming I located a "reroute" command, I could insert
something like "reroute F to B" inside my autoexec file,
and the new drive assignment would be permanently
resolved at each system inirialization.

Is something like:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2131593_assign-drive-letter-usb-drive.html
what I need? Or, maybe something like:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl...ic.windowsxp.general/PK1AWfNF4f4/bWAe60xvmW0J

Unlike these similar postings, my USB drives are never
detached/reattached.

Confirmations/ideas?

Thanks,

Gary

Remove the 'A-E' usb drive and insert the one you want to be F:, letting
Windows temporarily assign it as drive B: or whatever it wants. Now
right-click My Computer and select Manage, then Disk Management. Find
your USB drive in the list. Right click it and select Change Drive
Letter and Paths. Change the drive letter to F. Windows should now
remember it and try to assign it as drive F: again next time you
re-insert it.
 
P

Paul

Tim said:
Microsoft Windows SP3 XP [Version 5.1.2600]

I need some suggestions on the reassignment of drive letters.

Explanation:

Assume for the moment that no reserve drive letters exist.

I have a USB external drive that was partitioned as A - E.
I have a USB external drive that is accessed as F.

The A - E drive(s) are used in a backup rotation. Unfortu-
nately, the backup requirements have begun to exhaust the
available allocations of A - E.

Additionally, F contains only user data. "Many" internal
references exist specifically describing F, throughout
the system.

When I reformat/unpartition A -E, F will be dropped back
to B. Obviously, this will negatively affect all the previous
F references.

So, I need a way to "direct" all the F references to the
relocated B, so I don't have to manually change the F
references to B.

I have been reviewing DOS commands, specifically the
"assign". But assign is removed from this system.in the
favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,
while honored, produces no return information. And, the
command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions
involving my need.

Assuming I located a "reroute" command, I could insert
something like "reroute F to B" inside my autoexec file,
and the new drive assignment would be permanently
resolved at each system inirialization.

Is something like:
http://www.ehow.com/how_2131593_assign-drive-letter-usb-drive.html
what I need? Or, maybe something like:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl...ic.windowsxp.general/PK1AWfNF4f4/bWAe60xvmW0J


Unlike these similar postings, my USB drives are never
detached/reattached.

Confirmations/ideas?

Thanks,

Gary

Remove the 'A-E' usb drive and insert the one you want to be F:, letting
Windows temporarily assign it as drive B: or whatever it wants. Now
right-click My Computer and select Manage, then Disk Management. Find
your USB drive in the list. Right click it and select Change Drive
Letter and Paths. Change the drive letter to F. Windows should now
remember it and try to assign it as drive F: again next time you
re-insert it.

Stated another way, a "user-assigned F",
overrides the random system assignment of F to
the partition.

So using that interface to change the letter
from randomly assigned B to user assigned F,
it gets to keep the F later.

*******

If the drive with the newly assigned F is unplugged,
then F again becomes available for random assignment.
That can have consequences, if you have programs
automatically writing to F, you unplug the thing
with the user-assigned F, and then those programs
attempt to do their thing. I have that problem here,
with a RAMDisk I use, and when the RAMDisk isn't running,
stuff writes to whatever happens to be F: at the time.
(It's a pure coincidence, that my RAMDisk partition is F: also.)

When I get a new computer, I typically use that
interface to set my optical drive to "Q:", so it
will be half-way between the two limits of drive
letters. That way, my optical drive isn't
"moving around on me" later. So user-assigning
things, does have some advantages.

When you multi-boot several Windows OSes, the
drive lettering scheme is not kept between OSes.
If you want a user-assigned partition to be F
on all three OSes, then you'd need to make the
assignment in each OS for it to stick. One
OS doesn't know what the other OS is using for
drive lettering, and couldn't completely
honor the assignments in any case (C: is a special
case of sorts - each OS has its own idea where
the C: should be).

Paul
 
H

Hide

Hi Gary

Some time ago I had the same problem and found a solution in a program called
"USB Drive Letter Manager" (USBDLM).

It's not an easy to use program because first you have to identify every
external USB hardware device but after that you have lot of options for how
Windows uses en sees these devices.

Here it's still working like a charm, even on Windows 7x64.

Good luck, Tom
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>,
anonymous said:
I have been reviewing DOS commands, specifically the
"assign". But assign is removed from this system.in the

I don't know "assign", but what do you mean by it "is removed from this
system.in favor of subst"?
favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,
while honored, produces no return information. And, the
command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions
involving my need.

Again, we need more information: an empty subst command _will_ produce
no return information if nothing has been substed - is that what you
mean, or do you mean it returns nothing even after you _have_ substed?
[]
It may well not be the best way to solve your problem anyway, but I have
a soft soft for subst, it having been there for a Very Long Time. You do
have to invoke it at the right time: I have a one-line batch file (well,
two with a comment) in my c:\Documents and Settings\me\Start
Menu\Programs\Startup folder. (In which I also - I forget why - invoke
subst with its full pathname, thus
C:\minint\system32\subst J: D:\!my-site.web
..)
 
A

anonymous

I did visit the maintenance panels you mentioned. That is a far better approach for my need than my original idea(s). I need to review the drive letter maintenance facility a little further, but it seems like I might just be able to "lock" the F drive now, without the need of disconnecting the A-E partitioned unit. Then, once the A-E unit is reformatted/de-partitioned backto A, the locked F drive will remain in place. whatever.... one way or theother, your suggestion is certainly the appropriate answer. Thank you verymuch.
 
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A

anonymous

I did visit the maintenance panels you mentioned. That is a far better approach for my need than my original idea(s). I need to review the drive letter maintenance facility a little further, but it seems like I might just be able to "lock" the F drive now, without the need of disconnecting the A-Epartitioned unit. Then, once the A-E unit is reformatted/de-partitioned back to A, the locked F drive will remain in place. whatever.... one way or the other, your suggestion is certainly the appropriate answer. Thank you very much.

BTW, My reply here was intended for Tim Rude's 11/9 response.
 
A

anonymous

Stated another way, a "user-assigned F",

overrides the random system assignment of F to

the partition.



So using that interface to change the letter

from randomly assigned B to user assigned F,

it gets to keep the F later.



*******



If the drive with the newly assigned F is unplugged,

then F again becomes available for random assignment.

That can have consequences, if you have programs

automatically writing to F, you unplug the thing

with the user-assigned F, and then those programs

attempt to do their thing. I have that problem here,

with a RAMDisk I use, and when the RAMDisk isn't running,

stuff writes to whatever happens to be F: at the time.

(It's a pure coincidence, that my RAMDisk partition is F: also.)



When I get a new computer, I typically use that

interface to set my optical drive to "Q:", so it

will be half-way between the two limits of drive

letters. That way, my optical drive isn't

"moving around on me" later. So user-assigning

things, does have some advantages.



When you multi-boot several Windows OSes, the

drive lettering scheme is not kept between OSes.

If you want a user-assigned partition to be F

on all three OSes, then you'd need to make the

assignment in each OS for it to stick. One

OS doesn't know what the other OS is using for

drive lettering, and couldn't completely

honor the assignments in any case (C: is a special

case of sorts - each OS has its own idea where

the C: should be).



Paul


Thanks Paul, I think I have a good idea of what needs done, and where to do it now. You've also provided valuable information on propagating the drive specification across multiple systems. Thank you very much for your assist.
 
A

anonymous

Hi Gary



Some time ago I had the same problem and found a solution in a program called

"USB Drive Letter Manager" (USBDLM).



It's not an easy to use program because first you have to identify every

external USB hardware device but after that you have lot of options for how

Windows uses en sees these devices.



Here it's still working like a charm, even on Windows 7x64.



Good luck, Tom


Hi Tom,

I believe I read about your needs, and USBDLM usage when I was doing research to locate any similar postings. Generally, I'm a lot happier using an OSprovided facility, than the introduction of new SF. However, your testimony to the value of this APP is greatly appreciated. And I also value your contribution. Thank you very much.
 
A

anonymous

I don't know "assign", but what do you mean by it "is removed from this

system.in favor of subst"?


I only meant that the DOS command summary I was using mentioned that assignhad long been superseded by subst

favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,
while honored, produces no return information. And, the
command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions
involving my need.



Again, we need more information: an empty subst command _will_ produce

no return information if nothing has been substed - is that what you

mean, or do you mean it returns nothing even after you _have_ substed?

[]

It may well not be the best way to solve your problem anyway, but I have

a soft soft for subst, it having been there for a Very Long Time. You do

have to invoke it at the right time: I have a one-line batch file (well,

two with a comment) in my c:\Documents and Settings\me\Start

Menu\Programs\Startup folder. (In which I also - I forget why - invoke

subst with its full pathname, thus

C:\minint\system32\subst J: D:\!my-site.web

.)


You are correct, the issuance of subst on my system produced no return information, leading me to believe the command was void. I also believe you arecorrect in stating that my review into assign, subst, autoexec, etc, is entirely incorrect. Please see other suggestions regarding how this should bedone correctly. Thank you very much for your interest and contribution.
 
A

anonymous

On Saturday, November 9, 2013 8:36:18 PM UTC-6, anonymous wrote:


Thank each of you, Tim, Paul, Tom, and John, for the information, suggestions, and instruction on how to meet my need correctly. I really knew nothing of any drive letter maintenance panel(s) in the OS. This is just what I need. Thanks again. - Gary
 
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A

anonymous

Explanation:

Assume for the moment that no reserve drive letters exist.

I have a USB external drive that was partitioned as A - E.

I have a USB external drive that is accessed as F.

The A - E drive(s) are used in a backup rotation. Unfortu-

nately, the backup requirements have begun to exhaust the

available allocations of A - E.

Additionally, F contains only user data. "Many" internal

references exist specifically describing F, throughout

the system.

When I reformat/unpartition A -E, F will be dropped back

to B. Obviously, this will negatively affect all the previous

F references.

So, I need a way to "direct" all the F references to the

relocated B, so I don't have to manually change the F

references to B.

I have been reviewing DOS commands, specifically the

"assign". But assign is removed from this system.in the

favor of "subst". However, and empty subst command,

while honored, produces no return information. And, the

command explanation(s) seem to suggest restrictions

involving my need.

Assuming I located a "reroute" command, I could insert

something like "reroute F to B" inside my autoexec file,

and the new drive assignment would be permanently

resolved at each system inirialization.

Is something like:

http://www.ehow.com/how_2131593_assign-drive-letter-usb-drive.html

what I need? Or, maybe something like:

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl...ic.windowsxp.general/PK1AWfNF4f4/bWAe60xvmW0J

Unlike these similar postings, my USB drives are never

detached/reattached.

Confirmations/ideas?

Thanks,

Gary

I just wanted to briefly relay my experiences with this drive reconfiguration issue.

Referencing my earlier explanation, I de-partitioned A-E, and then formatted A as the full physical drive. This caused no movement/reassignment with the F drive, which was the point of my post. So, it appears that, unless manipulated via the "drive letter modification" panel(which I was directed earlier), no drive letter repositioning/reassignment will ever occur. IOW, my questions and concerns for initiating this post were entirely unfounded. I apologize for taking valuable time for this issue.

Thanks,

Gary
 

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