DNS Resolver Questions


T

Tom Naves

I can't good definitions of some of the terms used in the Windows XP
dns resolver.

If my host is on a domain named mydomain.com my primary suffix will be
mydomain.com right? Now when I try to resolve a host name my unqualified
name e.g., host, my resolver will append mydomain.com to the hostname and
resolve it in dns. Right?

In Windows XP, where you put the Primary DNS suffix of this computer,
there is a box that is labeled "Change primary DNS suffix when domain
membership changes." Does this refer to a Windows Domain?

In the Advanced DNS settings by default, it is set to Append primary and
connection specific DNS suffixes. What is a connection specific suffix?

There is also a selection called Append parent suffixes of the primary DNS
suffix. This would only apply if I was in a subdomain such as
mydept.mydomin.com correct? Then if I try to resolve a hosname such as
host then the resolver would first append mydept.mydomain
(host.mydept.mydomain.com) and failing that it would append mydomain.com
(host.mydomain.com) and try to resolve it. Correct? So if I am in a dnd
domain

mydomain.com and there are no subdomians I would not select this correct?

Any advise will be appreciated.


Tom Naves
 
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K

Kevin D. Goodknecht [MVP]

In
Tom Naves said:
I can't good definitions of some of the terms used in the Windows XP
dns resolver.

If my host is on a domain named mydomain.com my primary suffix will be
mydomain.com right? Now when I try to resolve a host name my
unqualified name e.g., host, my resolver will append mydomain.com to
the hostname and resolve it in dns. Right?
Right.


In Windows XP, where you put the Primary DNS suffix of this computer,
there is a box that is labeled "Change primary DNS suffix when domain
membership changes." Does this refer to a Windows Domain?
Yes.


In the Advanced DNS settings by default, it is set to Append primary
and connection specific DNS suffixes. What is a connection specific
suffix?

The connection specific DNS suffix is the one close to the bottom on the DNS
tab in TCP/IP properties.
There is also a selection called Append parent suffixes of the
primary DNS suffix. This would only apply if I was in a subdomain
such as mydept.mydomin.com correct?

Correct.

Then if I try to resolve a
hosname such as host then the resolver would first append
mydept.mydomain (host.mydept.mydomain.com) and failing that it would
append mydomain.com (host.mydomain.com) and try to resolve it.
Correct?
Correct.

So if I am in a dnd domain mydomain.com and there are no subdomians I would not select this
correct?

Correct.
 
H

Herb Martin

So if I am in a dnd domain mydomain.com and there are no subdomians I
would not select this

Correct.

One might also use this feature for "sibling domains" or even
completely separete DNS trees that live in the same network
area.

domain.com machine that has "friends" on "otherdomain.com",
or child1.domain.com with sibling domain "child2.domain.com."
in the neighborhood.

Note that such suffixing is merely about CONVENIENCE and
doesn't really change anything essential to most purposes.
 
T

Tom Naves

Kevin:

Thanks for all the information. I have one more question:

I know where in Advanced DNS settings to configure a connection specific
suffix. What I do not know is what is a connection specific suffix. How
does it differ from the primary dns suffix?

Regards,

Tom
 
K

Kevin D. Goodknecht [MVP]

In
Tom Naves said:
Kevin:

Thanks for all the information. I have one more question:

I know where in Advanced DNS settings to configure a connection
specific suffix. What I do not know is what is a connection specific
suffix. How does it differ from the primary dns suffix?

Connection Specific Suffixes are totally optional and usually are not
needed, DHCP can also assign the connection suffix using option 015.
Sometimes you may want a different connection suffix, only if you want the
machine's address registered in a different zone. Also, you may want it to
be the same as the primary DNS suffix in DHCP if you have any clients that
cannot register themselves in DNS, such as NT4 or Win9x. DHCP can register
these clients for you.
 
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H

Herb Martin

I know where in Advanced DNS settings to configure a connection specific
suffix. What I do not know is what is a connection specific suffix. How
does it differ from the primary dns suffix?

Kevin answered you but here is the gist:

Gives you the option to register DIFFERENT NICs under different
machine names.

Really only matter for a client that dynamically registers itself.

I use this to keep my Router (which is also a domain machine)
from registering it's name with the OUTSIDE address on the
inside network.

I use a connection specific on the OUTSIDE NICs with different
names: cable.learnquick.com and dsl.learnquick.com

While the interior nic uses the machine default: learnquick.com

The machine name gets prefixed onto each of these so if I wish
to find the "dsl" address, I can just ping or nslookup for it.

I could also just disable the registration, but I find it convenient
to be able to "discover that address" without having to TS or
telnet over to the machine.
 
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