Damaged IE blocks Outlook


J

Jim S

Updating IE to IE11 blitzed my IE and now Outlook 2010 cannot open.
I have tried many ways to restore IE without success. So be it as I seldom
use IE.
I am told that this only happens because Outlook is set to post in HTML and
it would be fine if I was in text only.
Is there a way to change the HTML/text setting without opening it?
 
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V

VanguardLH

Jim said:
Updating IE to IE11 blitzed my IE and now Outlook 2010 cannot open.
I have tried many ways to restore IE without success. So be it as I seldom
use IE.
I am told that this only happens because Outlook is set to post in HTML and
it would be fine if I was in text only.
Is there a way to change the HTML/text setting without opening it?
My guess is starting Outlook with the preview pane off might help.
Without the preview pane, Outlook doesn't need the IE libs to render an
HTML e-mail. Even if an HTML-formatted e-mail is pre-selected in the
Inbox folder when you load Outlook, it'll only show the headers (which
are never in any format other than plain text). The HTML formatting is
in the body of the e-mail and with the preview pane off then Outlook
doesn't have to render the body.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/command-line-switches-HP001003110.aspx

Look at the /nopreview command-line switch.
 
J

Jim S

My guess is starting Outlook with the preview pane off might help.
Without the preview pane, Outlook doesn't need the IE libs to render an
HTML e-mail. Even if an HTML-formatted e-mail is pre-selected in the
Inbox folder when you load Outlook, it'll only show the headers (which
are never in any format other than plain text). The HTML formatting is
in the body of the e-mail and with the preview pane off then Outlook
doesn't have to render the body.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/command-line-switches-HP001003110.aspx

Look at the /nopreview command-line switch.
Thanks, but did not work.
 
V

VanguardLH

Jim said:
Thanks, but did not work.
That's what I feared ... that Outlook does a preliminary check when it
loads and before it even attempts to render an e-mail. Looks like
you're still stuck trying to fix the IE problem you noted in another
thread in the IE newsgroup.

I remember from the other thread that you said you tried the Repair on
Microsoft Office. Have you ever performed the Repair on Windows 7.
This performs an in-place reinstall of Windows to step on most files and
registry entries in a current instance of Windows. You then follow with
a visit to the Windows Update site (but this time deselect any IE
updates past version 9 or whatever maximum version you want).

Did you ever create a system repair disc? See "Create a system repair
disc" in Windows' own help. If not, did you install Windows 7 on an
non-partitioned hard disk? When installing, Windows 7 won't alter the
partitions on the hard disk and install itself in one partition using
the free disk space. If there are no partitions on the hard disk,
Windows 7 creates 2 partitions: 100 MB recovery partition and the rest
(using the specified size during installation) is used for the OS
partition. If you have the 100 MB recovery partition, search Windows'
own help on "startup repair" to see how to use it. You can also read:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/what-are-system-recovery-options#what-are-system-recovery-options=windows-7

and click on the "To open the System Recovery Options menu on your
computer". Just like with prior versions of Windows, you have to hit F8
as Windows *first* starts to load to get at the Windows boot menu. You
may need the Windows installation CD. I cannot speak from personal
experience but I have yet needed to do the in-place reinstall (repair)
of my Windows 7 installation (and you can bingle as well as I can).

If this is a pre-built computer with the OS pre-installed (i.e., you
bought a computer already made and it came with Windows 7 already
installed) then it's likely there is a boot-time rescue option; however,
that likely restores the OS partition to a factory-time image and you'll
lose all apps you installed, OS and app tweaks, and your data on that
partition. Their rescue will do the same as you using a Windows install
CD and opting to format the partition before installing Windows (but you
would have to install all the drivers and bundleware the OEM included).

I don't recall and don't want to search your IE thread but ... have you
yet tried using System Restore to restore to a point in time before you
installed the the IE11 update?

Oh, by the way, after you uninstalled IE11, did the Windows Platform
Update (KB2670838), coined the "Evil Update", also disappear? IE10+
won't work on Windows 7 without the install of that update. That's
because it relies on methods (functions) available in a later version of
DirectX. The DX platform is included in Windows 8 but had to get
backported for use on Windows 7. When you do the IE10+ update
(install), it includes the DirectX platform update; see the following:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2670838
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/windows/apps/jj863687.aspx

I don't remember if an uninstall of IE11 also uninstalls the DX platform
update but I do know an uninstall of the DX platform update will force
an uninstall of IE10+.
 
J

Jim S

That's what I feared ... that Outlook does a preliminary check when it
loads and before it even attempts to render an e-mail. Looks like
you're still stuck trying to fix the IE problem you noted in another
thread in the IE newsgroup.

I remember from the other thread that you said you tried the Repair on
Microsoft Office. Have you ever performed the Repair on Windows 7.
This performs an in-place reinstall of Windows to step on most files and
registry entries in a current instance of Windows. You then follow with
a visit to the Windows Update site (but this time deselect any IE
updates past version 9 or whatever maximum version you want).

Did you ever create a system repair disc? See "Create a system repair
disc" in Windows' own help. If not, did you install Windows 7 on an
non-partitioned hard disk? When installing, Windows 7 won't alter the
partitions on the hard disk and install itself in one partition using
the free disk space. If there are no partitions on the hard disk,
Windows 7 creates 2 partitions: 100 MB recovery partition and the rest
(using the specified size during installation) is used for the OS
partition. If you have the 100 MB recovery partition, search Windows'
own help on "startup repair" to see how to use it. You can also read:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/what-are-system-recovery-options#what-are-system-recovery-options=windows-7

and click on the "To open the System Recovery Options menu on your
computer". Just like with prior versions of Windows, you have to hit F8
as Windows *first* starts to load to get at the Windows boot menu. You
may need the Windows installation CD. I cannot speak from personal
experience but I have yet needed to do the in-place reinstall (repair)
of my Windows 7 installation (and you can bingle as well as I can).

If this is a pre-built computer with the OS pre-installed (i.e., you
bought a computer already made and it came with Windows 7 already
installed) then it's likely there is a boot-time rescue option; however,
that likely restores the OS partition to a factory-time image and you'll
lose all apps you installed, OS and app tweaks, and your data on that
partition. Their rescue will do the same as you using a Windows install
CD and opting to format the partition before installing Windows (but you
would have to install all the drivers and bundleware the OEM included).

I don't recall and don't want to search your IE thread but ... have you
yet tried using System Restore to restore to a point in time before you
installed the the IE11 update?

Oh, by the way, after you uninstalled IE11, did the Windows Platform
Update (KB2670838), coined the "Evil Update", also disappear? IE10+
won't work on Windows 7 without the install of that update. That's
because it relies on methods (functions) available in a later version of
DirectX. The DX platform is included in Windows 8 but had to get
backported for use on Windows 7. When you do the IE10+ update
(install), it includes the DirectX platform update; see the following:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2670838
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/windows/apps/jj863687.aspx

I don't remember if an uninstall of IE11 also uninstalls the DX platform
update but I do know an uninstall of the DX platform update will force
an uninstall of IE10+.
I have done pretty much everything you say and other things besides.
My early recovery points have vanished so the only ones I have date back to
our original conversation elsewhere.
My recovery disc came up with an error 0x4001100200001012.
Any attempt to uninstall IE11 or re-install it fails.
Although I have no need of IE as a browser, its absence makes it impossible
to load Outlook 2010 and Access and although the former is no big deal
Access will be.
I am getting to the point of a complete format and reinstall, which will be
a nightmare, but so be it.
I have my original Windows 7 discs, but when I tried them I got blocked,
probably because of the updates that have happened since then.
If I delete EVERY update would I then be able to repair W7 from the
original disc?
 
V

VanguardLH

Jim said:
I have done pretty much everything you say and other things besides.
My early recovery points have vanished so the only ones I have date back to
our original conversation elsewhere.
My recovery disc came up with an error 0x4001100200001012.
Any attempt to uninstall IE11 or re-install it fails.
Although I have no need of IE as a browser, its absence makes it impossible
to load Outlook 2010 and Access and although the former is no big deal
Access will be.
I am getting to the point of a complete format and reinstall, which will be
a nightmare, but so be it.
I have my original Windows 7 discs, but when I tried them I got blocked,
probably because of the updates that have happened since then.
If I delete EVERY update would I then be able to repair W7 from the
original disc?
If you elect to format the selected/created partition during the
install, there won't be any updates to get in your way. You'll have to
go to the WU to get all those updates again. It might take only an
evening to install Windows 7 but it could several more to get all the
updates and then the updates on the updates. Just watch the update list
to make sure you do NOT elect to install IE10 or IE11.

If later you want to test IE10 or IE11 again, or just about any major
software, make sure to save a full image backup of, at least, your OS
partition.
 
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J

Jim S

If you elect to format the selected/created partition during the
install, there won't be any updates to get in your way. You'll have to
go to the WU to get all those updates again. It might take only an
evening to install Windows 7 but it could several more to get all the
updates and then the updates on the updates. Just watch the update list
to make sure you do NOT elect to install IE10 or IE11.

If later you want to test IE10 or IE11 again, or just about any major
software, make sure to save a full image backup of, at least, your OS
partition.
OK. I've gone through the process in one of the paras above, but I am still
scared of losing everything.
I got to a point where I could see three partitions 1. OSA(?) 2. Recovery
and 3. OS(?) or something like that.
At that point my nerve failed.
I was not sure which of these to install to and what I am going to lose as
a consequence.
I guess you will have picked up along the way that my 'original' disc is
from before the service pack, which will not uninstall.
 
J

Jim S

VanguardLH said:
If you elect to format the selected/created partition during the
install, there won't be any updates to get in your way. You'll have
to go to the WU to get all those updates again. It might take only an
evening to install Windows 7 but it could several more to get all the
updates and then the updates on the updates. Just watch the update
list to make sure you do NOT elect to install IE10 or IE11.

If later you want to test IE10 or IE11 again, or just about any major
software, make sure to save a full image backup of, at least, your OS
partition.
OK. I've gone through the process in one of the paras above, but I am
still scared of losing everything.
I got to a point where I could see three partitions 1. OSA(?) 2.
Recovery and 3. OS(?) or something like that.
At that point my nerve failed.
I was not sure which of these to install to and what I am going to lose
as a consequence.
I guess you will have picked up along the way that my 'original' disc is
from before the service pack, which I tried uninstalling, but it won't.
 
V

VanguardLH

Jim said:
OK. I've gone through the process in one of the paras above, but I am still
scared of losing everything.
I got to a point where I could see three partitions 1. OSA(?) 2. Recovery
and 3. OS(?) or something like that.
At that point my nerve failed.
I was not sure which of these to install to and what I am going to lose as
a consequence.
I guess you will have picked up along the way that my 'original' disc is
from before the service pack, which will not uninstall.
At this point, Windows installation queries should be posted in a
Windows general or installation newsgroup. This is getting off-topic
for this newsgroup. There is a newsgroup for Windows 7 at:

alt.windows7.general

Just be sure to have backups of all your data. That includes any config
files for your apps if you don't want to lose the setups. You can use a
backup program to save the backups to a different drive or removable
media or just copy the data file onto, say, a USB flash drive. It's up
to you where you store your data backup.

If you delete all partitions and let Windows 7 create its own, it will
create 2 partitions: 100 MB recovery & the rest is for the OS partition.
If you don't want 2 partitions for Windows 7 then you need to first
create your own partitions by using a 3rd party partition manager.
Minitool has a partition manager in a bootable image you can burned on a
CD. UltimateBootCD provides a bootable image you burn onto CD that has
several partition managers, like Parted Magic. Both of those are free.

http://www.partitionwizard.com/partition-wizard-bootable-cd.html
http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/

At first, I didn't want 2 partitions for Windows 7 but later decided to
keep the 100 MB boot (system reserved) partition because it can be used
for recovery when Windows itself is so badly corrupted that it won't
boot or is too unusable. With no partitions on the hard disk, Windows 7
will default to creating the following partitions:

See
on what happens with
partitioning when there are no existing partitions on the hard disk
(there were none or you deleted them all) when you install Windows 7.
You'll get 2 partitions: boot/system reserved and the OS partition.
That's what the installer does. Only if there are existing partitions
does Windows 7 not interfere with an existing layout. So if you want
only 1 partition, you'll have to create it before using the Windows 7
installer.

I don't know what is an "OSA" partition or what is "something like
that". Currently you have 3 partitions. With a default install of
Windows 7, you'd have 2 partitions. If you bought a pre-built computer
with the OS pre-installed then perhaps the 3rd partition is the OEMer's
recovery partition which lets you rebuild your computer back to factory-
time setup (rather than you doing a generic install of Windows and then
having to following with driver installs -- but you will get all the
fluffware the OEMer included in their recovery image).

Make sure you save all your data files (your docs and configs) BEFORE
you format the partitions. Formatting means you lose all files. If you
don't feel comfortable and have no experience with installing an OS then
don't do it. Also, if the computer builder provided their own recovery
image or setup program in a hidden partition then you might want to
start with that and then later investigate what of their fluffware you
can eliminate. For a pre-built computer, read its manual to see how the
OEMer has you recover to factory setup.

Again, this is wandering off to a fresh Windows installation or using
the factory recovery image/setup and is off-topic here. While the
problem you are trying to resolve might involve Outlook, a new OS
installation affects everything.
 
J

Jim S

Jim S said:
Updating IE to IE11 blitzed my IE and now Outlook 2010 cannot open.
I have tried many ways to restore IE without success. So be it as I seldom
use IE.
I am told that this only happens because Outlook is set to post in HTML and
it would be fine if I was in text only.
Is there a way to change the HTML/text setting without opening it?
Thanks I'll go there if I ever pluck up the courage. :)
--
Jim S



----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://www.piaohong.tk/newsgroup
 
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J

Jim S

At this point, Windows installation queries should be posted in a
Windows general or installation newsgroup. This is getting off-topic
for this newsgroup. There is a newsgroup for Windows 7 at:

alt.windows7.general
Thanks for your help thus far.
If I ever pluck up the courage I'll do the reinstall. Until then I'll work
around the problem.
I'll post there i if and when :)
 
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