Council unfairly closes one of Europe's biggest nightclubs! And I never got a chance to go.

Should the fabric nightclub in London really have been closed?

  • Yes

    Votes: 1 33.3%
  • No

    Votes: 2 66.7%

  • Total voters
    3
  • Poll closed .

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Man, I sure am gutted. Jack Sparrow loves a good drink, but he loves a massive rave even more.

I was actually planning on going here over the half-term holidays, as I'm off work. But this is just another nail in the coffin for UK nightlife.

The sad, completely empty and desolate current state of the fabric nightclub in London

We're talking about the fabric nightclub in London. I've never been out-out in London yet, and fabric is highly respected around the world. The council revoked their license on Tuesday night, effectively ending the club's life, after 17 years of operation.

Two 18-year old boys unfortunately died on the premises after taking controlled substances. Somehow, it's all the club's fault.
Now I'm not going to moralize, as that isn't what this topic is about. But these two boys did choose to take the controlled substances, so I can't see how it's automatically the club's fault.

Clubs accross the nation are going to have to deal with patrons taking controlled substances from time to time, it's part of running a nightclub. I don't think fabric could really have done much to prevent these deaths. However, the council just loves to get involved by closing it down and ruining everybody's fun. Did they really think that closing fabric down is going to have any impact on the use of controlled substances in the area?

Supposedly, the reason the council decided to close the club is indeed because of these two drug-related deaths in a short space of time (external link, BBC Newsbeat). But you didn't believe that, did you? Many clubs which have had many more deaths related to controlled substances have been allowed to continue operating.

No, of course, the real reason it was closed is because of money (external link, Wikipedia). Whoever successfully executed that Freedom of Information request against Islington's Council, I'd like to thank you, as it exposes how they're just out to ruin everybody's fun, and make a buttload of money while they do so.

The idea is that the council invests into developing the land that fabric is situated on, then sell the lease and get a quick return. The recent incidents at fabric have provided a brilliant opportunity for the council to turn fabric into a scapegoat, so that they can close the club and get what they want. Shocking, isn't it?

So one of Europe's biggest nightclubs will sadly soon be meeting its maker. It'll most likely be replaced with expensive flats which nobody can afford. This kind of thing should be illegal, it makes me sick to the stomach. What about when I see people taking controlled substances on the streets in my area? How about we close those streets down and build flats on them, so nobody can get anywhere? Yeah, great idea.

There will probably be a large protest on Saturday (Islington Council should really see this coming) in response to the outcome.

I just wanted to know how everybody on here feels about this situation. If you've been to fabric, or even if you're not into nightclubs, I hope you can see that what has happened is very sad for everyone who enjoys nightlife, and is damaging to London's late-night economy.

Feel free to vote in the poll, and if you do, please explain your response.

I appreciate that this might be a volatile topic, so please don't argue or start a flame war. Respect the opinions of other members, as the purpose of this topic is to gather input from members who may not be in the same demographic group as me.

- Capt. Jack Sparrow.
 
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Becky

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Abarbarian

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Oh my oh my what a major disaster. Oooooooooooooop norf we have only just recovered from the closure of the Twisted Wheel and the Torch. What will become of us all. :rolleyes:
 

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Hate to say this, but it looks like nightclubs really are dying. Is it the bad commercial chart music, the crowd they attract or just the fact that modern society is changing?

Will my kids (if I ever decide to have any) ever know what it's like to ride that dancefloor to the latest beats? Or will they be staying in all night, watching Netflix? With more and more nightclubs becoming derelict, to me they really are a sad sight to see. What was once a nightlife hotspot, bustling with party-goers, is now an empty, ageing building which you wouldn't look twice at.

I like them because they provide a place to escape reality, even if it's just for one night, not giving a damn about what other people think when you're there. Everybody is united, enjoying the same music, at the same time. All your problems temporarily disappear. I guess there's not many people my age on PC Review, but nightlife still does appeal to me, and it doesn't look like I'm going to get bored of it any time soon.

Just my 2 cents.

- Capt. Jack Sparrow.
 

nivrip

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Is it the bad commercial chart music, the crowd they attract or just the fact that modern society is changing?

I reckon that it's the changing of society. To me night clubs are so 1970s and things have changed, in general, so much since then. That isn't a bad thing but just life.

Nothing stays the same and it would be a very boring life if it did. Most things go in cycles so maybe they will return at some time in the future. :)
 
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floppybootstomp

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I posted on Facebook about this, here's my thoughts, cuss words starred out:

So Islington Council closed Fabric because of two drug related deaths. That was the excuse the council needed and closed Fabric anyway, despite the club outlining it’s anti-drug measures to them in detail.

Fabric was opened 17 years ago in what was then a crappy run down area and went on to be labelled ‘the best night club in the world’. But since 1999 the area, like most of London, has become gentrified and property prices have soared and any area with a London post code has become very much sought after by developers and building companies wanting to build yet another high rise block they can make a vast profit on.

Most councils encourage this as building new private homes is a very lucrative business and councillors know that granting planning permission will gain them huge back-handers and all councillors of all political persuasions find it very difficult to turn down huge amounts of cash.

So, if all attempts fail to re-open Fabric, what will we see on the club site? It’s very very probable it will be another private property development.

All these developments without any local nightlife will lead (has led) to swathes of dull unexciting areas all across the capital without any culture or vibrant spark at all, just boring acres of little boxy expensive flats housing people who think they’ve made a fine investment.

As for the drug deaths that Islington Council shut Fabric down because of, by closing the club there will be more drug deaths, not less. People will always want to gather, dance, and yes, take drugs. We will see a return to the mid eighties to mid nineties warehouse and house parties where there is no drug enforcement or advice at all which will inevitably lead to drug deaths, usually through badly mixed ecstasy tabs.

These illegal ‘raves’ will also lead to more clashes between young folk and the police and there will probably be bloodshed as the Met Police now look like a reserve unit of the SAS and do love to wade in and bust a few skulls.

Whether Islington Council can see the result of their enforcement, it doesn’t matter, all that matters to them is the money that can be made by seizing a lucrative property site and the cash that will find it’s way to their bank accounts. Accounts of which many are offshore, no doubt.

I mourn Fabric’s passing even though I never went there and I’m probably too old to attend that scene but I will say that the people responsible for Fabric’s closure are just a bunch of greedy *****. I despair.
 

Abarbarian

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Clubs accross the nation are going to have to deal with patrons taking controlled substances from time to time, it's part of running a nightclub.

- Capt. Jack Sparrow.

Them folk in the Big Smoke are sure behind the times then. They were selling drugs in York in the early 60's/70's. For instance at The Boulevard an Post Office club INL (Walmgate The Railway Institute an The Enterprise Club an The York Assembly Rooms an Cat's Whiskers an Brummels an King's Manor Cellar an Tiffany's an Hotshots an The De Grey Rooms an The Barge an The Revolution Club an The Pop Club an Casanovas an The Arts Centre an The Winning Post an The Rialto an Zarf club an Old World club an the Heartbeat an the Hyptnotique an as far as I know any and all the clubs in York since then. :eek: or so me mates tell me.

Here is an interesting snippet,

http://www.yorkcitysouth.co.uk/gigs4u.htm

1960s. Before my time, Procol Harum (at the time, number one in the charts) and Pink Floyd at New Earswick's Folk Hall and its regular Tuesday ("Bop") night gigs. At the end of the 60s, I remember hearing stories of how one of my teachers would look into his pupil's eyes every Wednesday morning for signs of those who'd been indulging in drugs at the gig the night before. Later the venue also staged a regular Saturday gig (known as the "Tin Chicken Club").

I'm not a big fan of this modern ecstasy clubbing scene and what for me is pretty boring beat noise that they call music. I prefer my music and clubbing to be at smaller venues with much more variety. Mind you at my age I prefer to go to a decent pub with some decent ale.
 

floppybootstomp

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Heehee, some of you are sure enough sounding like a load of grizzled old farts :D

I'm 65 but I still considered visiting Fabric and I'm sure I would have enjoyed it there.

Present day clubs aren't behind with the times, they're keeping up with the times. I was going to clubs in '67 in SE London and lots of drugs were available then and they have been available since before then and up to the present day. I don't exactly agree with it but that's the way it is and they're not going to go away.

I can just about remember purple hearts, there was no ecstasy or crack cocaine back in them days but there was speed, mogadons, tuenol, all sorts of marijuana, lsd, mescalin and if you were rich - cocaine. I never saw heroin being sold anywhere in those days.

I like all sorts of music including rave music and liked what Skrillex put out a few years back and will listen to and enjoy acts such as Chase and Status and deadmau5. I stopped taking drugs more than a decade ago, no real reason, just got fed up with them and anyway, between '74 and now hardly dabbled with any anyway, mostly just the occasional joint to be social.

These days, being somewhat advanced in years, Guinness is my drug of choice ;)

There are ulterior motives for closing Fabric, most of them fuelled by greed.
 
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Urmas

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... and any area with a London post code has become very much sought after by developers and building companies wanting to build yet another high rise block...

Here is a [corporate] example — Helsinki, 1960. A pulp & paper giant wants to build a shiny, FANCY HQ in the heart of the city.

Before:

1018923-1042.jpg


After:

Enso1.jpeg



Yuck. :cry:
 
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nivrip

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Pity the poll at the top of this thread didn't have a "Couldn't Care Less" option. :D
 

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