Copy Excel chart to MS Word and print gridlines?


G

Guest

I have an Excel spreadsheet including printed gridlines. When I copy it into
an MS Word document the gridlines disappear. How can I move the chart to MS
word and still print the gridlines?

I am using Office 2003 editions of both MSWord and Excel.
 
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G

Guest

Normally, it is the opposite question, "How do I copy WITHOUT the gridlines?"
Either way, when you copy and paste from Excel to Word, it is a good idea to
use Edit>Paste Special and experiment with the options available until you
get the desired result. Normally, if you choose the "Bitmap" option, the
selected worksheet area will appear in Word as it does in Excel. Using one
of the "Picture" options will typically omit the gridlines. A basic copy and
paste seldom produces a desirable result.
 
G

Guest

Thanks for the tip. I tried it, using the "Bitmap" option, and that works
fine. Appreciate your help. Now all I have to do is find out what "bitmap"
means!

Regards

Chrisl 99
 
M

Mike Middleton

Chris L 99 -

If it's a chart object on a worksheet, you could try: Select the chart by
clicking just inside its outer border. Hold down the Shift key, and from the
Edit menu, choose Copy Picture. Try some of those options, and then do the
usual Paste into Word.

- Mike
http://www.mikemiddleton.com
 
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G

Guest

In a nutshell, "bitmap" means "consumes alot of memory". Of course, you
could Google it and get a more technical answer, but trust me on this one.
Since you have discovered a method you know will work in a crunch, do some
more experimenting. Try selecting the Excel cells you wish to convey to
Word, right click your mouse,>Format Cells>Border> and add some dark lines.
Then select the cells, right click and choose Copy. Then go to Word and
click Edit>Paste Special> and choose one of the "Picture" options. Your new
"dark" gridlines should appear and the associated graphic will consume much
less of your memory resources. Fool around with these options until you get
the proper mix-- it's different for every application and you just have to
keep at it until you get what is right for you! But work at it from both
ends- Excel and Word present options which can optimize the final appearance
in your document. I wish you the best of luck- let me know if I can help
further.
 

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