CONDITIONAL COUNTIF FUNTIONS PLEASE HELP!!!


L

laandmc

I am trying to count a certain number of cells based on whether a condition
is satisfied. I want a formular rather like the sumproduct but countproduct
instead.

Please see example below.

I want to count for both companies COMP1 and COMP2 how many non zero cells
there are in the first table, but only when the corresponding cell in the 2nd
table has a "y" in that cell. at the moment I can do this using if functions
with a countif function in the middle. However I am doing this over a period
of 3 years so it makes my formular ridiculously long.

A B C
1 JAN FEB
2 COMP 1 1 2
3 COMP 2 1 0
4
5 JAN FEB
6 COMP 1 y
7 COMP 2 y y
8
9 count none zero with "y"
10 COMP 1 1 <-- =IF(B6="y",COUNTIF(B2,"<>0"),0)+IF(C6="y",COUNTIF(C2,"<>0"),0)
11 COMP 2 1 <-- =IF(B7="y",COUNTIF(B7,"<>0"),0)+IF(C7="y",COUNTIF(C7,"<>0"),0)

I want a way to do it for example = countproduct(b2:c2,(b6:c6="y")*1))

Can anyone help me?? is there another way to do this?

Laurence
 
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L

Luke M

You're pretty close. You can still use SUMPRODUCT, just force all the array
to become true/false conditions.

Comp 1:
=SUMPRODUCT((B2:C2<>0)*(B6:C6="y"))
Comp 2:
=SUMPRODUCT((B3:C3<>0)*(B7:C7="y"))

Increase array sizes as desired.
 
L

Luke M

You're pretty close. You can still use SUMPRODUCT, just force all the array
to become true/false conditions.

Comp 1:
=SUMPRODUCT((B2:C2<>0)*(B6:C6="y"))
Comp 2:
=SUMPRODUCT((B3:C3<>0)*(B7:C7="y"))

Increase array sizes as desired.
 
S

Sean Timmons

=SUMPRODUCT(--(A1:A3=A10),--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y"))+SUMPRODUCT(--(A1:A3=A10),--(C1:C3<>0)*--(C5:C7="y"))

Will get you a count for company 1 same formula but change A10 to A11 for
company 2. Merely $ the rest of the formulas as needed to keep your ranges
constant.
 
S

Sean Timmons

=SUMPRODUCT(--(A1:A3=A10),--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y"))+SUMPRODUCT(--(A1:A3=A10),--(C1:C3<>0)*--(C5:C7="y"))

Will get you a count for company 1 same formula but change A10 to A11 for
company 2. Merely $ the rest of the formulas as needed to keep your ranges
constant.
 
D

David Biddulph

With a multiplication * you don't need the double unary minus.
--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y")
is the same as
(B1:B3<>0)*(B5:B7="y")

The double unary minus is there to force an arithmetic operation where you
weren't already doing one, but in your case you are doing the
multiplication.
 
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D

David Biddulph

With a multiplication * you don't need the double unary minus.
--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y")
is the same as
(B1:B3<>0)*(B5:B7="y")

The double unary minus is there to force an arithmetic operation where you
weren't already doing one, but in your case you are doing the
multiplication.
 
S

Sean Timmons

Thank you for the correction. Good to know!

David Biddulph said:
With a multiplication * you don't need the double unary minus.
--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y")
is the same as
(B1:B3<>0)*(B5:B7="y")

The double unary minus is there to force an arithmetic operation where you
weren't already doing one, but in your case you are doing the
multiplication.
 
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Advertisements

S

Sean Timmons

Thank you for the correction. Good to know!

David Biddulph said:
With a multiplication * you don't need the double unary minus.
--(B1:B3<>0)*--(B5:B7="y")
is the same as
(B1:B3<>0)*(B5:B7="y")

The double unary minus is there to force an arithmetic operation where you
weren't already doing one, but in your case you are doing the
multiplication.
 

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