cloning to a new hard drive w/ Acronis True Image 9 - How?


M

Mary Fowler Leek

Would someone please help me by looking over the information on the
following drives? From everything I can determine, either of these WD drives
will work to replace the original drive that came with my computer. Would a
more computer literate person confirm this before I order a new drive? :)


There's nothing wrong with my original drive. It's just getting full. I
work with digital images a lot, so really need more working space.

I've purchased Acronis True Image v9, which has the ability to clone. Do I
install the new drive as a slave first, format it, then clone my old
original drive to it, then remove the old drive, reset the jumpers on the
new drive and install it as the primary? I'm not certain of the procedure
and want to be certain I know what I'm doing before I begin. I do not want
to have to reinstall and update all of my software if I can help it.

You guys are terrific. I learn so much here and I thank you for all the time
you devote to helping the forum members.

..... Mary

Drives I'm considering:
Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD2500KS 250GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s
Hard Drive - OEM
............ or

Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA
3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM


The following is what I currently have installed as a drive:

Seagate INTERNAL Hard Drive SATA150 160GB 7200RPM 8MB (model #) ST3160023AS

* Hard drive size
* 160 GB

* Features
* SeaShell, 3D Defense System, Enhanced Partial Response Maximum Likelihood
(EPRML)

* Interface type
* Serial ATA-150

* Form factor
* 3.5" x 1/3H

* Buffer size
* 8 MB

* Hard drive compliant standards
* S.M.A.R.T.



my disk management reports the following for my primary drive:
ST3160023AS

(D:) Capacity - 6.96 GB
Used: 5.72 GB
Free: 1.24 GB

(C:) Capacity - 142.07 GB
Used: 102.04 GB
Free: 40.03 GB
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

dB

I strongly suggest to
simply "add" the new drive
to your system rather than
replace the one you have now.

This will alleviate much time
and aggravation.

Ensure that your system can
accept the additional harddrive
as most systems can.

Then when you add the new
hd, move the overloading data
from your master hd over
to the newer one...

Would someone please help me by looking over the information on the
following drives? From everything I can determine, either of these WD drives
will work to replace the original drive that came with my computer. Would a
more computer literate person confirm this before I order a new drive? :)


There's nothing wrong with my original drive. It's just getting full. I
work with digital images a lot, so really need more working space.

I've purchased Acronis True Image v9, which has the ability to clone. Do I
install the new drive as a slave first, format it, then clone my old
original drive to it, then remove the old drive, reset the jumpers on the
new drive and install it as the primary? I'm not certain of the procedure
and want to be certain I know what I'm doing before I begin. I do not want
to have to reinstall and update all of my software if I can help it.

You guys are terrific. I learn so much here and I thank you for all the time
you devote to helping the forum members.

.... Mary

Drives I'm considering:
Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD2500KS 250GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s
Hard Drive - OEM
........... or

Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA
3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM


The following is what I currently have installed as a drive:

Seagate INTERNAL Hard Drive SATA150 160GB 7200RPM 8MB (model #) ST3160023AS

* Hard drive size
* 160 GB

* Features
* SeaShell, 3D Defense System, Enhanced Partial Response Maximum Likelihood
(EPRML)

* Interface type
* Serial ATA-150

* Form factor
* 3.5" x 1/3H

* Buffer size
* 8 MB

* Hard drive compliant standards
* S.M.A.R.T.



my disk management reports the following for my primary drive:
ST3160023AS

(D:) Capacity - 6.96 GB
Used: 5.72 GB
Free: 1.24 GB

(C:) Capacity - 142.07 GB
Used: 102.04 GB
Free: 40.03 GB
 
P

Patrick Keenan

Mary Fowler Leek said:
Would someone please help me by looking over the information on the
following drives? From everything I can determine, either of these WD
drives will work to replace the original drive that came with my computer.
Would a more computer literate person confirm this before I order a new
drive? :)


There's nothing wrong with my original drive. It's just getting full. I
work with digital images a lot, so really need more working space.

I've purchased Acronis True Image v9, which has the ability to clone. Do I
install the new drive as a slave first, format it, then clone my old
original drive to it, then remove the old drive, reset the jumpers on the
new drive and install it as the primary? I'm not certain of the procedure
and want to be certain I know what I'm doing before I begin. I do not want
to have to reinstall and update all of my software if I can help it.

If you're cloning, you attach the new drive in such a way that it doesn't
hang the machine and is physically recognised by True Image. If you're
attaching it internally, that often means setting it as Slave or via Cable
Select, whatever your system needs. It really only matters that the drive
is physically recognised. You do not have to initialize it or format it.

In True Image, choose Clone Drive, and select *manual* mode rather than
automatic. This will give you the "proportional" option, which will expand
the partition size to what is available on the new drive. If you select
automatic, the existing source partition size will be used, which won't get
to where you want to be.

Be very careful that you identify the source and destination drives
correctly.

Choose to leave the data as it is on the source drive, not to delete it.

Then let it go. You may need to restart the system if you're cloning a FAT
drive. When it's done, shut down, remove the original drive and put the
new on in its place setting jumpers appropriately. Restart and you should
be done.

As to the drives, be sure that your system supports SATA drives. Larger
caches can mean apparently higher speeds, or better response. Be sure that
the BIOS for your system can recognise the 500 gig drive before you get it.

Using larger drives raises another question: How do you back up the data?

HTH
-pk
 
A

Anna

Mary Fowler Leek said:
Would someone please help me by looking over the information on the
following drives? From everything I can determine, either of these WD
drives will work to replace the original drive that came with my computer.
Would a more computer literate person confirm this before I order a new
drive? :)


There's nothing wrong with my original drive. It's just getting full. I
work with digital images a lot, so really need more working space.

I've purchased Acronis True Image v9, which has the ability to clone. Do I
install the new drive as a slave first, format it, then clone my old
original drive to it, then remove the old drive, reset the jumpers on the
new drive and install it as the primary? I'm not certain of the procedure
and want to be certain I know what I'm doing before I begin. I do not want
to have to reinstall and update all of my software if I can help it.

You guys are terrific. I learn so much here and I thank you for all the
time you devote to helping the forum members.

.... Mary

Drives I'm considering:
Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD2500KS 250GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA
3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
........... or

Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA
3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM


The following is what I currently have installed as a drive:

Seagate INTERNAL Hard Drive SATA150 160GB 7200RPM 8MB (model #)
ST3160023AS

* Hard drive size
* 160 GB

* Features
* SeaShell, 3D Defense System, Enhanced Partial Response Maximum
Likelihood (EPRML)

* Interface type
* Serial ATA-150

* Form factor
* 3.5" x 1/3H

* Buffer size
* 8 MB

* Hard drive compliant standards
* S.M.A.R.T.



my disk management reports the following for my primary drive:
ST3160023AS

(D:) Capacity - 6.96 GB
Used: 5.72 GB
Free: 1.24 GB

(C:) Capacity - 142.07 GB
Used: 102.04 GB
Free: 40.03 GB


Mary:
First of all, either one of those WD SATA HDDs is fine - whatever capacity
suits you.

A word or two about their connections and then we'll get to the disk cloning
operation...

These are SATA HDDs, and as such there's really no Master/Slave designations
for them as there is for PATA (IDE) HDDs. You'll connect your new SATA HDD
to the appropriate (first) SATA connector on your motherboard - it will be
designated either the 0 or 1 SATA connector. Before undertaking the disk
cloning operation it would be wise to connect your old SATA HDD to the
second SATA (1 or 2) connector.

In general there's no need for any jumper configuration on your SATA HDD.
The WD drives are SATA-II HDDs (the latest generation) with a data interface
of 3 Gb/sec. (Your current Seagate SATA HDD is the earlier generation with a
data interface of 1.5 Gb/sec). There is, however, a jumper setting on the WD
limiting the interface to 1.5 Gb/sec. This is used in the unlikely, but
possible, event that your motherboard does not have the capability of
working with a SATA HDD's 3 Gb/sec data interface. Note that even though a
motherboard was designed with the 1.5 Gb/sec interface capability, in most
cases it can handle the 3 Gb/sec one without any problem. So you'll
configure the WD with the 1.5 Gb/sec jumper limitation *only* if that
problem arises.

Now as to the disk cloning operation...

First of all, there is *no* need to partition/format your new SATA HDD. The
disk cloning operation will take care of that.

Coincidentally, I just posted a few moments ago step-by-step instructions
for using the Acronis True Image 9 program. You may want to take a look at
them at the microsoft.public.windowsxp.general newsgroup with the Subject:
"Re: Clone software recommendation" with today's date.

One cautionary note when using the Acronis program...
Make absolutely sure as you go through the disk cloning process that you
correctly identify your source disk, i.e., the drive you're cloning FROM
(your Seagate) and your destination disk, i.e., the recipient of the disk
clone, (your WD). Sometimes, in one's haste, the drives will be
inadvertently misidentified with disastrous results.

I assume that after you successfully clone the contents of your old HDD to
the new one you'll be using that drive as a storage/backup drive. If so, you
can leave it connected to the SATA 1 or 2 connector. Just make sure your new
SATA HDD remains on the SATA 0 (or 1) connector.
Anna
 
M

Mary Fowler Leek

Anna and Patrick,

Thank you both so much for taking the time to describe the process. It will
not only help me, but who knows how many other readers, who will print out
and save these detailed instructions for future reference.

I'm not even certain if I have two internal hard drive bays. Terrible, isn't
it, but I'll have to open up and take a look. I do have a 250 gig usb
external drive that I could clone to, then switch out the old primary hard
drive with the new one, boot from my Acronis recovery cd and reverse the
cloning process from the just cloned usb drive, back to the newly installed
internal hard drive. Will this work if I don't have two sata connections
inside my box?

I've been in there in the past but I've forgotten the internal
configuration. Well, just took a quick look. There are two drive bays open
but the sata cable only has one connector. Is that correct. Should there be
another cable connector on the MB where another sata cable would connect or
do you use a sata cable with dual plugs on one end, like we used to use with
the IDE/EIDE drives? I guess I need to go get a flash light and climb under
the desk and see if I can spot what might be another place to connect a
second cable and drive to the MB. Getting too old for all this digging
around under the desk! :)

My thanks once again for all the great detailed explanations.

Mary
 
A

Anna

(Mary: One addendum to my previous post. See below...)



Anna said:
Mary:
First of all, either one of those WD SATA HDDs is fine - whatever capacity
suits you.

A word or two about their connections and then we'll get to the disk
cloning operation...

These are SATA HDDs, and as such there's really no Master/Slave
designations for them as there is for PATA (IDE) HDDs. You'll connect your
new SATA HDD to the appropriate (first) SATA connector on your
motherboard - it will be designated either the 0 or 1 SATA connector.
Before undertaking the disk cloning operation it would be wise to connect
your old SATA HDD to the second SATA (1 or 2) connector.

In general there's no need for any jumper configuration on your SATA HDD.
The WD drives are SATA-II HDDs (the latest generation) with a data
interface of 3 Gb/sec. (Your current Seagate SATA HDD is the earlier
generation with a data interface of 1.5 Gb/sec). There is, however, a
jumper setting on the WD limiting the interface to 1.5 Gb/sec. This is
used in the unlikely, but possible, event that your motherboard does not
have the capability of working with a SATA HDD's 3 Gb/sec data interface.
Note that even though a motherboard was designed with the 1.5 Gb/sec
interface capability, in most cases it can handle the 3 Gb/sec one without
any problem. So you'll configure the WD with the 1.5 Gb/sec jumper
limitation *only* if that problem arises.

Now as to the disk cloning operation...

First of all, there is *no* need to partition/format your new SATA HDD.
The disk cloning operation will take care of that.

Coincidentally, I just posted a few moments ago step-by-step instructions
for using the Acronis True Image 9 program. You may want to take a look at
them at the microsoft.public.windowsxp.general newsgroup with the Subject:
"Re: Clone software recommendation" with today's date.

One cautionary note when using the Acronis program...
Make absolutely sure as you go through the disk cloning process that you
correctly identify your source disk, i.e., the drive you're cloning FROM
(your Seagate) and your destination disk, i.e., the recipient of the disk
clone, (your WD). Sometimes, in one's haste, the drives will be
inadvertently misidentified with disastrous results.

I assume that after you successfully clone the contents of your old HDD to
the new one you'll be using that drive as a storage/backup drive. If so,
you can leave it connected to the SATA 1 or 2 connector. Just make sure
your new SATA HDD remains on the SATA 0 (or 1) connector.
Anna


Mary:
While in most cases it's appropriate, as I indicated above, to connect your
SATA boot HDD to the motherboard's SATA 0 connector (or 1, if that's
designated as the first SATA connector), there are a few (very few!)
motherboards that require the HDD to be connected to a SATA connector other
than the 0 (or 1) connector when there is a non-RAID configuration involved.
Since you didn't mention the make & model of your motherboard I don't know
if this affects your situation. My guess is that it doesn't - so that at the
outset you should connect your booting SATA HDD to the SATA 0 (or 1)
connector - but I thought I should mention this possibility.
Anna
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Mary Fowler Leek

Patrick,

I'm not sure about the MB, whether it will support the larger drive? I don't
even know what to look for. The driver for the bios is dated 4/29/2005 and
it is an American Megatrends v 3.21.

Regarding backing up a larger drive; I hope I don't create that many new
keeper files! Ha But isn't it best to let the OS have lots of room to write
temp files, etc., when you're doing a lot of digital editing. My current
primary drive only has about 40 gigs free right now. I do use a 250gig
external backup drive. Actually, I use three backup drives but this is the
largest one.

Mary
 
A

Anna

Mary Fowler Leek said:
Anna and Patrick,

Thank you both so much for taking the time to describe the process. It
will not only help me, but who knows how many other readers, who will
print out and save these detailed instructions for future reference.

I'm not even certain if I have two internal hard drive bays. Terrible,
isn't it, but I'll have to open up and take a look. I do have a 250 gig
usb external drive that I could clone to, then switch out the old primary
hard drive with the new one, boot from my Acronis recovery cd and reverse
the cloning process from the just cloned usb drive, back to the newly
installed internal hard drive. Will this work if I don't have two sata
connections inside my box?

I've been in there in the past but I've forgotten the internal
configuration. Well, just took a quick look. There are two drive bays open
but the sata cable only has one connector. Is that correct. Should there
be another cable connector on the MB where another sata cable would
connect or do you use a sata cable with dual plugs on one end, like we
used to use with the IDE/EIDE drives? I guess I need to go get a flash
light and climb under the desk and see if I can spot what might be another
place to connect a second cable and drive to the MB. Getting too old for
all this digging around under the desk! :)

My thanks once again for all the great detailed explanations.

Mary


(And Mary's later post...)
Patrick,

I'm not sure about the MB, whether it will support the larger drive? I don't
even know what to look for. The driver for the bios is dated 4/29/2005 and
it is an American Megatrends v 3.21.

Regarding backing up a larger drive; I hope I don't create that many new
keeper files! Ha But isn't it best to let the OS have lots of room to write
temp files, etc., when you're doing a lot of digital editing. My current
primary drive only has about 40 gigs free right now. I do use a 250gig
external backup drive. Actually, I use three backup drives but this is the
largest one.

Mary


Mary:
Taking your last post first...
There's no problem with your motherboard supporting large-capacity disks,
i.e., disks > 137 GB, so there should be no problem with that board
supporting even a 500 GB HDD. But if you have some qualms about that you
should contact the manufacturer of your motherboard for verification.

I'm not sure I understand your last paragraph. Are you referring to the
possibility of multi-partitioning your HDD? If so, that of course is up to
you depending upon how you prefer to organize your work. Frankly, I'm not a
strong advocate of partitioning one's day-to-day working HDD. I prefer to
organize my work through the use of folders representing major blocks or
elements of my data. What *is* important is that you establish & maintain a
comprehensive routine & systematic backup system of your work. And that is
what you're doing - or at least contemplating - through the use of the disk
cloning - disk imaging process.

As to your thoughts about cloning your present internal HDD to your USB
external HDD and then re:cloning the latter's contents back to your new
internal SATA HDD after the latter is installed...

You could do that of course. But is there some advantage to this? Would it
not be a more straightforward operation to simply clone the contents of your
present internal HDD to your new one? If you want to clone the contents of
your present internal HDD to the USBEHD for additional safety at *this*
point, there's certainly no harm in doing so. As a matter of fact I would
encourage you to do so.

As to your description of your present SATA cabling...

In your previous post in which you described your system you indicated you
had a single 160 GB SATA HDD. That is still the case, yes? If so, that SATA
HDD (like every SATA HDD) has only a single signal (data) cable attached to
it with the other end connected to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
SATA HDDs use a completely different data cable than the older PATA (IDE)
HDDs. So when you install your new SATA HDD (while the original SATA HDD is
still connected), the new HDD will be connected with its own SATA data
cable.

I trust all this is clear to you?
Anna
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Patrick Keenan

Mary Fowler Leek said:
Anna and Patrick,

Thank you both so much for taking the time to describe the process. It
will not only help me, but who knows how many other readers, who will
print out and save these detailed instructions for future reference.

I'm not even certain if I have two internal hard drive bays. Terrible,
isn't it, but I'll have to open up and take a look. I do have a 250 gig
usb external drive that I could clone to, then switch out the old primary
hard drive with the new one, boot from my Acronis recovery cd and reverse
the cloning process from the just cloned usb drive, back to the newly
installed internal hard drive. Will this work if I don't have two sata
connections inside my box?

I've been in there in the past but I've forgotten the internal
configuration. Well, just took a quick look. There are two drive bays open
but the sata cable only has one connector. Is that correct. Should there
be another cable connector on the MB where another sata cable would
connect or do you use a sata cable with dual plugs on one end, like we
used to use with the IDE/EIDE drives? I guess I need to go get a flash
light and climb under the desk and see if I can spot what might be another
place to connect a second cable and drive to the MB. Getting too old for
all this digging around under the desk! :)

My thanks once again for all the great detailed explanations.

Mary

There should be more SATA ports on the motherboard - look there. And you
don't need to bolt the new drive in while you're doing this.

Alternately, use external cases or adapters. These are useful and not
particularly expensive. The ones I use were under CDN$30.

I regularly do cloning to and from drives attached via USB 2.0 cases or
adapters, not internal to the system. It's not a problem for TrueImage;
some older versions of Ghost could only clone via DOS reboot, and had
difficulties with anything external, SCSI or USB. It's a little slower but
for the purpose that doesn't matter.

As to two-stage cloning, this may not give you the option to revise the
partition size.

HTH
-pk
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top