Canon Print Life...


P

puss

Can't seem to find ant specs on the Print life with the better Canon Printers,
why is this, ? Epson has info on there web sits..
 
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C

Chris Stumpf

Can't seem to find ant specs on the Print life with the better Canon Printers,
why is this, ? Epson has info on there web sits..
Paper and ink is the deciding factor in print life, paper more so than ink.
The Canon Photo Paper Pro has reworked for longer life, but I'm not sure if
it is available anywhere except Japan yet. Red River Polar series papers are
reported to last longer than the Canon paper. Epson Premium Glossy Photo
Paper also works well with the Canon printers and inks. For the ultimate in
long life prints, the new Kodak Ultima Picture Paper with 'New ColorLast
Technology'. Please not that if the package doesn't say "New ColorLast
Technology" on it then it is crap and will give horrible results. It is
supposed to be good for 100 years sitting out in the open or 200 years stored
in an album or behind glass in a picture frame. Even if it only lasts for
half that, it's as good as any regular photo.
 
P

puss

Paper and ink is the deciding factor in print life, paper more so than ink.
The Canon Photo Paper Pro has reworked for longer life, but I'm not sure if
it is available anywhere except Japan yet. Red River Polar series papers are
reported to last longer than the Canon paper. Epson Premium Glossy Photo
Paper also works well with the Canon printers and inks. For the ultimate in
long life prints, the new Kodak Ultima Picture Paper with 'New ColorLast
Technology'. Please not that if the package doesn't say "New ColorLast
Technology" on it then it is crap and will give horrible results. It is
supposed to be good for 100 years sitting out in the open or 200 years stored
in an album or behind glass in a picture frame. Even if it only lasts for
half that, it's as good as any regular photo.


From what I have read Canon has a print life of 2 Years Only Epson printers
offer 100 year print life, its not just the paper its the Inks that are used..

Epson's can use any type of inks, Bubble Jets can't
 
C

Chris Stumpf

From what I have read Canon has a print life of 2 Years Only Epson printers
offer 100 year print life, its not just the paper its the Inks that are used..
That's old info, the papers have changed. Ink type does affect print life,
but paper is the overwhelming factor in how long a print will last. The two
things that affect print life the most are Gas fade and UV fade. Gas fade is
by far the worst. Basically Ozone and other gases in the air react
chemically with the dye from the ink and cause it to change color or fade.
UV rays from sunlight will do the same thing, but it takes much, much longer.
Gas fade varies by region and season. The new Kodak paper is a swellable
coating that encapsulates the ink, protecting it from both gas and UV fading.
 
J

Jon O'Brien

Epson printers offer 100 year print life...
Marketing bullshit based on tests done using fluorescent lights.

Stephen Livick carried out tests on prints from the 2100/2200, 7600 and
9600 on Epson's velvet fine art paper and got results ranging from 145
years @ 50 lux/day tungsten lighting (museum-level) to 3.16 years @ 2300
lux/day daylight (near a large widow). Getting 275 lux/day daylight
(considered the average for a 'normal' room) the prints were rated @ 26.5
years.

Other combinations of printer model/paper got varying results, some as low
as eight years I think, but only coated prints achieved the kind of levels
Epson's claiming under realistic conditions. Coated Hahnemuhle Photo Rag
was rated at 296 years in one test.

See: http://www.livick.com/method/inkjet/pg2d.htm

Jon.
 
R

Ron Baird

Greetings Puss,

There are many factors that will impact the life of a print. In general,
however, it is the paper itself, the media used to create the image, and the
environ of storage, i.e. the amount and type of light that gets to the
print. Kodak has spent a great deal of time money, and research to come up
with its new ColorLast papers. These papers work in concert to address all
of the issues just mentioned which makes it possible for them to say they
are The longest-lasting inkjet photo paper. Check the site about this new
technology to learn more about it.

http://www.kodak.com/go/inkjet

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company


From what I have read Canon has a print life of 2 Years Only Epson printers
offer 100 year print life, its not just the paper its the Inks that are used..

Epson's can use any type of inks, Bubble Jets can't



-------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments
that take our breath away. (George Carlin)
 
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J

Jon O'Brien

ronbaird@kodak.com (Ron Baird) said:
Kodak has spent a great deal of time money, and research to
come up with its new ColorLast papers.
http://www.kodak.com/go/inkjet
Thanks for the link. Very interesting stuff.

I'm looking forward to the promised update on Epson printers using pigment
inks, especially as much is made of the mordants used to 'fix' ink dyes.
It will also be interesting to see how well the pigment particles pass
through the top coating layers and diffuse into the ink absorbing layer.

A few questions, if you're able to answer them:

1) The technical paper doesn't mention the light source used in the
accelerated tests, although the 'home survey' paper does mention how
important it is to consider 'spectral quality'. Did the tests assume, and
include, exposure to direct sunlight? You'll see from my previous post
that I'm somewhat cynical about tests based purely on fluorescent light
sources!

2) The recommended printer settings table suggests using the Epson 2200
(UK 2100) driver's PhotoEnhance4 setting. What implications does this have
for those of us that normally use the 'No colour adjustment' setting and
assign profiles in our printing software (Photoshop, Qimage, etc.)? What
colour space is being assumed?

3) Are there any plans for sizes >8.5" x 11" and/or a matte version?

Nice to see someone from a manufacturer contributing here, by the way.
It's a shame there aren't more printer/paper manufacturers represented
here as well. Top marks Kodak & HP - and apologies if I've missed anyone
else!

Jon.
 
C

Clay

Jon O'Brien said:
Thanks for the link. Very interesting stuff.
I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson 1200
[epson oem inks, kodak recommended settings]. I waited 24 hours before taking a
critical look [recommended drying time], and was disappointed to see a metallic
reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.
 
P

puss

Jon O'Brien said:
Thanks for the link. Very interesting stuff.
I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson 1200
[epson oem inks, kodak recommended settings]. I waited 24 hours before taking a
critical look [recommended drying time], and was disappointed to see a metallic
reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.


This is funny I printed a Pic the other day using a old Epson 740 and some
Mitsubishi Gloss Paper, after it dried like the next day the shadow parts look
like Gold..???

That was using the standard 740 Epson inks..
 
J

Jon O'Brien

I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson
1200...a metallic reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.
Bronzing caused by ink sitting on the surface of the paper. If that's
happening with Epson dye inks, there's little hope of pigment inks being
absorbed.

Jon.
 
C

Clay

Jon O'Brien said:
I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson
1200...a metallic reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.
Bronzing caused by ink sitting on the surface of the paper. If that's
happening with Epson dye inks, there's little hope of pigment inks being
absorbed.

Jon.
Yes, it's happening with oem epson dye inks using kodak's recommended printer
settings. Not a good sign.
 
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R

Richard

Clay said:
Jon O'Brien said:
I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson
1200...a metallic reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.
Bronzing caused by ink sitting on the surface of the paper. If that's
happening with Epson dye inks, there's little hope of pigment inks being
absorbed.

Jon.
Yes, it's happening with oem epson dye inks using kodak's recommended printer
settings. Not a good sign.

That is bad news. I had planned to try this paper out with my Epson
1270 but trading quality for longevity is not acceptable.
 
J

Jon O'Brien

I had planned to try this paper out with my Epson
1270 but trading quality for longevity is not acceptable.
If you want real longevity and a gloss finish, it may be worth considering
using a fine art paper, such as Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, and coating it with
Clear Shield gloss. There are semi-gloss and matt versions as well.

Jon.
 
P

puss

Jon O'Brien said:
Thanks for the link. Very interesting stuff.
I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson 1200
[epson oem inks, kodak recommended settings]. I waited 24 hours before taking a
critical look [recommended drying time], and was disappointed to see a metallic
reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.


This is funny I printed a Pic the other day using a old Epson 740 and some
Mitsubishi Gloss Paper, after it dried like the next day the shadow parts look
like Gold..???

That was using the standard 740 Epson inks..
 
B

bob

Paper and ink is the deciding factor in print life, paper more so than ink.
The Canon Photo Paper Pro has reworked for longer life, but I'm not sure if
it is available anywhere except Japan yet.
Does this eliminate the "yellowing" that seems to happen so quickly
with the existing stock?
 
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T

Tom Monego

I just tried a few prints with colorlast [cat 8784670] using my epson 1200
[epson oem inks, kodak recommended settings]. I waited 24 hours before taking a
critical look [recommended drying time], and was disappointed to see a metallic
reflective sheen in the darkest areas of the prints.

This generally means you have too much ink, use Ink jet paper not glossy.
Different papers will need different ink levels.

Tom
 
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