Canon Pixma


B

Boppy

Hi guys, I purchased the Pixma IP 4200 last year and generally love
it. Unfortunately I can't watercolour images that I've converted to
line drawing because the ink runs as soon as my watercolour brush
touches it.

The reason I chose this printer is because it advertised a waterfast
ink for photo printing, which I took to mean would be waterfast for
painting purposes. When I discovered it wasn't, I approached Canon who
told me that only one tank contained this special ink. They were of no
help whatsoever.

Does anyone know how I can specify to print from this particular tank
so I can achieve water-fastness?

Thanks in advance for any comment or advice.

Jo
 
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B

babaloo

Try copying or outputting the line drawing to a laser printer ?
 
B

Boppy

Try copying or outputting the line drawing to a laser printer ?
Thanks for the suggestion. I was sort of hoping for some advice that
might apply to the printer I already have.
 
B

Bernie

Hi guys, I purchased the Pixma IP 4200 last year and generally love
it. Unfortunately I can't watercolour images that I've converted to
line drawing because the ink runs as soon as my watercolour brush
touches it.

The reason I chose this printer is because it advertised a waterfast
ink for photo printing, which I took to mean would be waterfast for
painting purposes. When I discovered it wasn't, I approached Canon who
told me that only one tank contained this special ink. They were of no
help whatsoever.

Does anyone know how I can specify to print from this particular tank
so I can achieve water-fastness?

Thanks in advance for any comment or advice.

Jo
They're referring to the black, pigment-based ink. That is the one in
the larger cartridge. See
http://www.canon.com/technology/canon_tech/explanation/pg_ink.html for
more info.

To use that cartridge print pages that use only black, and don't use
double-sided printing/
 
P

Paul Heslop

Boppy said:
Thanks Bernie. The page was only black and single-sided. Even after 14
hours drying time, it still runs when I touch it with my brush.
I think the large cart is only used in normal quality, if memory
serves me right. I'm also not sure whether when choosing photo paper
in settings you might bypass it and go into the smaller black cart.
Try using plain paper setting with normal/average quality. Of course
it might not work but is worth a try.
 
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F

frederick

Boppy said:
Hi guys, I purchased the Pixma IP 4200 last year and generally love
it. Unfortunately I can't watercolour images that I've converted to
line drawing because the ink runs as soon as my watercolour brush
touches it.

The reason I chose this printer is because it advertised a waterfast
ink for photo printing, which I took to mean would be waterfast for
painting purposes. When I discovered it wasn't, I approached Canon who
told me that only one tank contained this special ink. They were of no
help whatsoever.

Does anyone know how I can specify to print from this particular tank
so I can achieve water-fastness?

Thanks in advance for any comment or advice.

Jo
If a photo paper is what you want, try a "fast-dry" type Epson premium,
Ilford "smooth" and various others labelled as "fast-dry". Perhaps
there is a better chance of this meeting your needs, but it's not what
I'd expect to see a watercolour on.
Otherwise, take the printer back to where you bought it and ask for your
money back. In a4 size inkjet printers, an Epson R800 is the only one
that will meet your apparent need for water-resistant colour printing on
fine art papers.
 
A

Arthur Entlich

The printer you have only has one pigment ink, the black ink, and it is
only used for text printing typically.

Using certain papers can make dye inks waterproof, and Canon does make
such a paper. That probably will not fully resolve your problem
however, because applying paper or paints to the print may cause the ink
to run anyway.

Canon, Epson and HP all have printers that use pigments inks through
out, for all ink colors, but I still can't warrant that they will not
run with painting on top.

Art
 
B

Burt

Boppy said:
Hi guys, I purchased the Pixma IP 4200 last year and generally love
it. Unfortunately I can't watercolour images that I've converted to
line drawing because the ink runs as soon as my watercolour brush
touches it.

The reason I chose this printer is because it advertised a waterfast
ink for photo printing, which I took to mean would be waterfast for
painting purposes. When I discovered it wasn't, I approached Canon who
told me that only one tank contained this special ink. They were of no
help whatsoever.

Does anyone know how I can specify to print from this particular tank
so I can achieve water-fastness?

Thanks in advance for any comment or advice.

Jo
Use only the plain paper setting and do not have the duplex setting checked.
You had mentioned that you were only printing one side, but you didn't
specify that the duplex setting was on or off. Plain paper setting will
caused the printer to use the pigmented ink cart and not the dye-based black
cart to print black text and/or graphics.
 
B

Boppy

Use only the plain paper setting and do not have the duplex setting checked.
You had mentioned that you were only printing one side, but you didn't
specify that the duplex setting was on or off. Plain paper setting will
caused the printer to use the pigmented ink cart and not the dye-based black
cart to print black text and/or graphics.

Hi Burt, thanks for replying. I have unchecked the "duplex" setting
and printed under "plain paper" setting and still the ink smudges.
Jo
 
M

measekite

Boppy said:
Hi Burt, thanks for replying. I have unchecked the "duplex" setting
and printed under "plain paper" setting and still the ink smudges.
Jo
Everybody knows that would be the case but he just likes to feed his ego.

Here is some advice that may or may not work and even if it does you may
not like it.

First go get a can of Kyrlon Preserve It Matte spray. Now print your
document on a good paper. Hammermill Premium InkJet is fine. After it
drys for about 10 minutes lightly spray the document with Preserve It.
A couple of very light coats are fine. Now do the watercolor and see
what happens.
 
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T

Taliesyn

Boppy said:
Hi guys, I purchased the Pixma IP 4200 last year and generally love
it. Unfortunately I can't watercolour images that I've converted to
line drawing because the ink runs as soon as my watercolour brush
touches it.

The reason I chose this printer is because it advertised a waterfast
ink for photo printing, which I took to mean would be waterfast for
painting purposes. When I discovered it wasn't, I approached Canon who
told me that only one tank contained this special ink. They were of no
help whatsoever.

Does anyone know how I can specify to print from this particular tank
so I can achieve water-fastness?

Thanks in advance for any comment or advice.

Jo

I have a pack of Compujet brand Waterproof Photo Glossy Paper. And it
really is quite waterproof! I don't know how it would perform with
watercolours as I don't do this kind of art.

They advertise it as such: "Print brilliant, long-lasting, quick drying
color images that are both smudge-proof and scratch-proof! Perfect for
photographic portfolios, family portraits, and small outdoor posters,
signs and murals." The instructions also add that "Ink will be dry to
touch in less than one minute. Before stacking and storing, allow to sit
for 10 minutes." This would probably be a good suggestion also before
testing with watercolors.

I've used this paper for booklet covers I've printed as it is supposedly
more durable where frequent handling is involved. I've never really
torture tested it with water or the elements (outdoors).

-Taliesyn
 
B

Boppy

Boppywrote:


Everybody knows that would be the case but he just likes to feed his ego.

Here is some advice that may or may not work and even if it does you may
not like it.

First go get a can of Kyrlon Preserve It Matte spray. Now print your
document on a good paper. Hammermill Premium InkJet is fine. After it
drys for about 10 minutes lightly spray the document with Preserve It.
A couple of very light coats are fine. Now do the watercolor and see
what happens.

Unfortunately this product is not available where I live, but I'm
asking a couple of art suppliers for an alternative.
Cheers,
B
 
B

Boppy

Boppywrote:





I have a pack of Compujet brand Waterproof Photo Glossy Paper. And it
really is quite waterproof! I don't know how it would perform with
watercolours as I don't do this kind of art.

They advertise it as such: "Print brilliant, long-lasting, quick drying
color images that are both smudge-proof and scratch-proof! Perfect for
photographic portfolios, family portraits, and small outdoor posters,
signs and murals." The instructions also add that "Ink will be dry to
touch in less than one minute. Before stacking and storing, allow to sit
for 10 minutes." This would probably be a good suggestion also before
testing with watercolors.

I've used this paper for booklet covers I've printed as it is supposedly
more durable where frequent handling is involved. I've never really
torture tested it with water or the elements (outdoors).

-Taliesyn
Thanks for the suggestion - I have asked the ink supply guys to look
into this.

Cheers,
Jo
 
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M

measekite

Boppy said:
Unfortunately this product is not available where I live, but I'm
asking a couple of art suppliers for an alternative.
Cheers,
B
This product is made by Sherwin Williams who purchased Krylon. You may
be able to get it from them or you can find a place to get it online.
 

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