Cannot find a primary authoritative DNS server for single level domain


M

Marko

Hi,

Running the netdiag /fix command on our primary (root) DC (name: KENT,
IP: 192.168.1.2) returns an error:

- Cannot find a primary authoritative DNS server for the name
'kent.companyname'. The name 'kent.companyname' may not be registered
in the DNS.

We have a single label domain, such as: companyname, acting as forest
root.

It is incorrect that the server 'kent.companyname' is not registered
in the DNS as this is the SOA server, a PDC and a root zone server.

I applied the registry settings in MS article
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=300684. This had no effect on the
server behavior.

The root DC's DNS setting is pointing to its own IP 192.168.1.2.

This behavior is causing the NtFrs to fail.

Also, another PDC from an alternate non root domain (with an internet
domain name) cannot register in the root domain's _msdcs DNS
container. The returned error is: ID 5781 - Dynamic registration or
deregistration of one or more DNS records failed...

This is causing a major file replication problem on our network.

I understand that single label domains are a problem. However, we are
stuck with this 'companyname' root domain as our Exchange servers
depend on it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Marko
 
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H

Herb Martin

Marko said:
Hi,

Running the netdiag /fix command on our primary (root) DC (name: KENT,
IP: 192.168.1.2) returns an error:

- Cannot find a primary authoritative DNS server for the name
'kent.companyname'. The name 'kent.companyname' may not be registered
in the DNS.

We have a single label domain, such as: companyname, acting as forest
root.

Look above and you will see that you have a descrepancy -- "single
label name" vs. "kent.COMPANYNAME" which has to labels.
It is incorrect that the server 'kent.companyname' is not registered
in the DNS as this is the SOA server, a PDC and a root zone server.

"SOA server" really doesn't make much sense -- if the server has the
Zone (Primary, AD-integrated, Secondary) then it has an SOA for the
zone. (And is by the way authoritative even if it is a Secondary.)
I applied the registry settings in MS article
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=300684. This had no effect on the
server behavior.

The root DC's DNS setting is pointing to its own IP 192.168.1.2.

This behavior is causing the NtFrs to fail.

Also, another PDC from an alternate non root domain (with an internet
domain name) cannot register in the root domain's _msdcs DNS
container. The returned error is: ID 5781 - Dynamic registration or
deregistration of one or more DNS records failed...

This is causing a major file replication problem on our network.

I understand that single label domains are a problem. However, we are
stuck with this 'companyname' root domain as our Exchange servers
depend on it.

You will always hate this problem.
 
K

Kevin D. Goodknecht Sr. [MVP]

In
Marko said:
Hi,

Running the netdiag /fix command on our primary (root) DC
(name: KENT, IP: 192.168.1.2) returns an error:

- Cannot find a primary authoritative DNS server for the
name 'kent.companyname'. The name 'kent.companyname' may
not be registered in the DNS.

We have a single label domain, such as: companyname,
acting as forest root.

It is incorrect that the server 'kent.companyname' is not
registered in the DNS as this is the SOA server, a PDC
and a root zone server.

I applied the registry settings in MS article
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=300684. This had no
effect on the server behavior.

Apparently, something isn't right, did you make _all_ of the required
registry entries?

Is there a forward lookup zone named "companyname"?

Is the servers IP the only one you're using in TCP/IP for DNS?

The AD domain name must exactly match the Primary DNS suffix _and_ the
forward lookup zone name.
 
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L

LEW

OK, first verify the DC is pointed to a valid DNS which has dynamic dns
enabled. On NIC tcp/ip properties/advanced/dns, make sure the domain is
listed in the dns suffix for this connection box and that register this
connection and use this connection's suffix in registration are checked.
This tells the Domain controller what zone to register its services in so
other units and or programs like netdiag can find them. The dns server the
DC is pointing to should be a primary or AD integrated zone. Since this is
the root domain, the dns setting on the DC should not point to itself or
you may get the island effect.

Post Results.

Lee
 

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