Can I set XP video resolution to 640x480


M

metspitzer

I have a old machine with a Nvidia 6600ish video card.

I would like to use a TV for a second monitor. When I pick the dual
display, the lowest resolution choice is 800x600.

When I boot the machine, the TV will display the Windows start up
screen. After the machine boots, the TV displays....unusable signal.

I assume the TV can only display 640x480. Can I set XP to a lower
resolution.

Even when I use Nvidia's TV wizard, the min resolution is 800x600.
 
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M

metspitzer

I have a old machine with a Nvidia 6600ish video card.

I would like to use a TV for a second monitor.  When I pick the dual
display, the lowest resolution choice is 800x600.

When I boot the machine, the TV will display the Windows start up
screen.  After the machine boots, the TV displays....unusable signal.

I assume the TV can only display 640x480.  Can I set XP to a lower
resolution.

Even when I use Nvidia's TV wizard, the min resolution is 800x600.

BTW I am using a 25' s video cable, and I have had a laptop display a
picture on the TV in question with the cable in question in the past.
 
M

M.I.5¾

metspitzer said:
I have a old machine with a Nvidia 6600ish video card.

I would like to use a TV for a second monitor. When I pick the dual
display, the lowest resolution choice is 800x600.

When I boot the machine, the TV will display the Windows start up
screen. After the machine boots, the TV displays....unusable signal.

I assume the TV can only display 640x480. Can I set XP to a lower
resolution.

Even when I use Nvidia's TV wizard, the min resolution is 800x600.

The correct resolution for TV display is 720x480 if you are in the US and
720x576 elsewhere.

You will find that a TV set is a poor choice for a computer monitor.
 
M

M.I.5¾

Metspitzer said:
I want it to watch BBC clips. It worked fine when I was driving it
with my laptop.

Can you tell me how to set the computer to this resolution using a
Nvidia 6600 card please?

I don't have that specific card, but generally, the driver offers a display
tab on which you enable the TV output (you have to actually connect it
first). The Tab usually offers you the abilty to select the TV system and
the colour system. If the card allows you to have the TV and the monitor
active at the same time (displaying the same thing) the monitor either
adopts a similar display (if it supports it) or one will show a sub section
of the other.

A read of the book of instructions that came with the graphic card is
probably called for here.
 
P

Panzy

Metspitzer said:
I want it to watch BBC clips. It worked fine when I was driving it
with my laptop.

Can you tell me how to set the computer to this resolution using a
Nvidia 6600 card please?

The Resolution of 800x600 is for S-Video connections.
Your graphics card when configured for TV out, defaults to the
S-Video output and that specific resolution.

What I suspect is you may want to connect a second "display"
being your TV set, in which you may have other connections
such as VGA, DVI or even HDMI in which case you need to opt
for "twin monitor" or "Twin display" mode, not "TV out".
You also probably require an uptodate driver for your graphics card.
If indeed your TV set has VGA or DVI etc, do not configure "TV out"
but visit the Nvidia site, click support and download the latest driver
for that model and read the pdf guide for that card.
Note when connecting a TV set via VGA, DVI or HDMI, only the HDMI
connection will carry an audio signal as well, for the other connections
you will have to make seperate audio feeds.
If your graphics card has only S-Video output, the only resolution you
can get via that connection is 800x600, also S-Video only carries
the video signal, seperate audio connections have to made to hear sound.
 
M

M.I.5¾

Panzy said:
The Resolution of 800x600 is for S-Video connections.
Your graphics card when configured for TV out, defaults to the
S-Video output and that specific resolution.

What I suspect is you may want to connect a second "display"
being your TV set, in which you may have other connections
such as VGA, DVI or even HDMI in which case you need to opt
for "twin monitor" or "Twin display" mode, not "TV out".
You also probably require an uptodate driver for your graphics card.
If indeed your TV set has VGA or DVI etc, do not configure "TV out"
but visit the Nvidia site, click support and download the latest driver
for that model and read the pdf guide for that card.
Note when connecting a TV set via VGA, DVI or HDMI, only the HDMI
connection will carry an audio signal as well, for the other connections
you will have to make seperate audio feeds.
If your graphics card has only S-Video output, the only resolution you
can get via that connection is 800x600, also S-Video only carries
the video signal, seperate audio connections have to made to hear sound.

800x600 does not conform to any known TV standard. If a TV set displays a
picture at all, it will be purely because it is able to cope with a the
signal even though it is out of spec.
 
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P

Panzy

M.I.5¾ said:
800x600 does not conform to any known TV standard. If a TV set displays a
picture at all, it will be purely because it is able to cope with a the
signal even though it is out of spec.
You are Wrong.
S-Video output is 800x600. The TV system is what you are thinking of,
being NTSC of 29fps at 525 lines, and PAL/Secam being 24fps at 625 lines,
that is maintained via S-Video within a a set resolution of 800x600.
 
M

M.I.5¾

Panzy said:
You are Wrong.
S-Video output is 800x600. The TV system is what you are thinking of,
being NTSC of 29fps at 525 lines, and PAL/Secam being 24fps at 625 lines,
that is maintained via S-Video within a a set resolution of 800x600.

No, *you* are wrong in all parameters. NTSC uses just 480 active lines at
29.97 fps (close enough to 30 fps to not notice). PAL uses 576 active lines
at *25* fps. As I said: 800x600 will probably work with most modern TVs
being close enough to the required signal specification provided the correct
refresh rate is used but the outside edges of the video will be cropped.
The correct resolutions are 640x480 for NTSC and 720x576 for PAL. A graphic
card with TV output connectors should be capable of delivering those
resolutions. Even at those resolutions a standard TV will still crop the
outside edges from the picture due to 'overscan' (a legacy from CRT days).
 
P

Panzy

M.I.5¾ said:
No, *you* are wrong in all parameters. NTSC uses just 480 active lines at
29.97 fps (close enough to 30 fps to not notice). PAL uses 576 active
lines at *25* fps. As I said: 800x600 will probably work with most modern
TVs being close enough to the required signal specification provided the
correct refresh rate is used but the outside edges of the video will be
cropped. The correct resolutions are 640x480 for NTSC and 720x576 for PAL.
A graphic card with TV output connectors should be capable of delivering
those resolutions. Even at those resolutions a standard TV will still
crop the outside edges from the picture due to 'overscan' (a legacy from
CRT days).

You are still wrong.
You are confusing line resolution with pixel resolution.
When connected to a flat screen via S-Video, a flat screen that
composes the image in pixels can only accept 800x600 via S-video.
And that is the pixel resolution for S-video output.
Sorry to have to rub it in, but the "720x576 for PAL" is via the superior
SCART/PERITEL connection - not the inferior S-Video analog connection.
 
P

Panzy

You are still wrong.
You are confusing line resolution with pixel resolution.
When connected to a flat screen via S-Video, a flat screen that
composes the image in pixels can only accept 800x600 via S-video.
And that is the pixel resolution for S-video output.
Sorry to have to rub it in, but the "720x576 for PAL" is via the superior
SCART/PERITEL connection - not the inferior S-Video analog connection.

Ooops, I'm afraid I have to correct you yet again, PAL is 24fps.
Try not to get into too much of a tizz about it.
I'll leave you to wade through the following:
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=graphics+card,+S-Video,+800x600&btnG=Search&meta=&aq=f&oq=

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=S-Video,+800x600&btnG=Search&meta=&aq=f&oq=

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=800x600++S-Video&btnG=Search&meta=&aq=f&oq=
 
M

M.I.5¾

Panzy said:
You are still wrong.
You are confusing line resolution with pixel resolution.
When connected to a flat screen via S-Video, a flat screen that
composes the image in pixels can only accept 800x600 via S-video.
And that is the pixel resolution for S-video output.
Sorry to have to rub it in, but the "720x576 for PAL" is via the superior
SCART/PERITEL connection - not the inferior S-Video analog connection.

No it is you who are wrong. I don't know which comic you read this rubbish,
but it is just plain wrong. I have configured enough graphic systems to
match both standard video and oddball aircraft video displays to know what I
am talking about.

The video characteristics for CVBS (as carried by SCART/PERITEL) and S-Video
are precisely the same and are specified in Report 308-2 of the XIIth
Pleniary Assembly of the CCIR. Tables II and III column G is what you seek.
The luminance line of S-Video is *exactly* the same as a standard VBS
(monochrome to you) video signal having 576 active lines and a bandwidth
that relates to a maximum horizontal resolution of approximately 360 line
pairs [1] (usually described as a standard 625 line 50 field video signal).
The sole difference between CVBS and S-Video is that the colour information
is superimposed on the former and carried on a separate line on the latter.

Further PAL over CVBS (or SCART) is inferior, not superior, to S-Video as
there is cross talk between the chrominance and luminance. The SCART
specification provides for the carriage of S-Video by simply allocating the
colour to a separate line. SCART also provides for the carriage of video
using RGB, but that is not a PAL signal as the colour is not encoded. RGB
is superior to both CVBS and S-Video, the video characteristics are still
otherwise identical to the other two systems apart from the video bandwidth
which is much greater (hence the greater horizontal resolution).

A standard 625 line 50 field video signal regardless of whether it is CVBS,
S-Video, RGB or YCbCr owes nothing whatsoever to a computer 800x600 graphic
output (this latter having been specified around 2 decades later).

[1] This is broadly equivalent in resolution to a 720x576 pixel digital
signal, but the two can't be compared exactly as they are not the same
thing.
 
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M

M.I.5¾

Panzy said:
Ooops, I'm afraid I have to correct you yet again, PAL is 24fps.
Try not to get into too much of a tizz about it.
I'll leave you to wade through the following:

Report 308-2 of the XIIth Pleniary Assembly of the CCIR, Page 22 Table 1
Column G (for 625 line TV system) line 4 ("Picture (frame) frequency
(pictures per second") states 25. That makes you wrong. And for your
information, PAL has nothing to do with the frame frequency anyway. Brazil
runs a perfectly good PAL system that runs at 30 frames per second. There
are no known PAL encoded systems that use 24 frames per second.

Providing a raft of links for monitors that support 800x600 graphics that
also have an S-Video input does not prove that the S-Video signal is
800x600. My own 1920x1080 TV set has an S-Video input, but I would not even
attempt to use that as evidence that a standard S-Video signal is 1920x1080.
 

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