Blown speakers


M

Motor T

I mistakenly plugged the wrong power cord into my Creative Gigaworks
T40 speakers. One with 120v 60hz input and 12v 1.2A output. The
speakers made a humming noise for a few seconds and then went dead.
The speakers are almost brand new. No one in town seems to fix
computer speakers. Are they repairable or discards? Thanks.
 
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P

Pen

I mistakenly plugged the wrong power cord into my
Creative Gigaworks T40 speakers. One with 120v 60hz input
and 12v 1.2A output. The speakers made a humming noise for a
few seconds and then went dead. The speakers are almost
brand new. No one in town seems to fix computer speakers.
Are they repairable or discards? Thanks.
What are the correct power supply ratings?
 
M

Motor T

What are the correct power supply ratings?
The correct power cord says: input 100-240v 50/60hz 1.2a
-- output 27.0v 1.7a
I took the speaker apart and the circuit boards show no sign of
damage. I can't see inside the plastic box that holds the connectors
however. Thanks for reply.

Ed Mc
Nam Vet '66-'67
Semper Fi
 
R

Rodney Pont

The correct power cord says: input 100-240v 50/60hz 1.2a
-- output 27.0v 1.7a
I took the speaker apart and the circuit boards show no sign of
damage. I can't see inside the plastic box that holds the connectors
however. Thanks for reply.
Have you tried them with the correct power supply? I can't see 12v
damaging something that uses 27v.
 
M

Motor T

I mistakenly plugged the wrong power cord into my Creative Gigaworks
T40 speakers. One with 120v 60hz input and 12v 1.2A output. The
speakers made a humming noise for a few seconds and then went dead.
The speakers are almost brand new. No one in town seems to fix
computer speakers. Are they repairable or discards? Thanks.
I took the speaker apart. There is a very tiny fuse on the board
connected to the hookups. I jumped it and the speaker turns on again.
Hopefully this is the problem. Unfortunately the fuse is soldered on
both ends to the circuit board. Is there some kind of tape or jelly
that will act as a conductor across this fuse? Thanks for all help.
 
S

SC Tom

Motor T said:
I took the speaker apart. There is a very tiny fuse on the board connected to the hookups. I jumped it and the speaker
turns on again. Hopefully this is the problem. Unfortunately the fuse is soldered on both ends to the circuit board.
Is there some kind of tape or jelly that will act as a conductor across this fuse? Thanks for all help.

Does the fuse look similar to this:

http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G14356

If you can read the value of the fuse, or if it's printed somewhere on the circuit board, you can get one like this to
solder across the blown one (if you don't have a solder sucker to remove the old fuse). Or if someone you know has the
soldering gear to do it, buy 'em a beer to change it for you (after it's done, of course).
 
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M

Motor T

Does the fuse look similar to this:

http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G14356

If you can read the value of the fuse, or if it's printed somewhere on
the circuit board, you can get one like this to solder across the
blown one (if you don't have a solder sucker to remove the old fuse).
Or if someone you know has the soldering gear to do it, buy 'em a beer
to change it for you (after it's done, of course).
Thanks for reply. Here is my fuse:
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f120/EdMc1/PICT0026.jpg
I have a solder gun but I'm afraid its way too big. Since I'm pretty
sure this is my problem I suppose I'll get it fixed eventually.
 
P

Paul

Motor said:
Thanks for reply. Here is my fuse:
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f120/EdMc1/PICT0026.jpg
I have a solder gun but I'm afraid its way too big. Since I'm pretty
sure this is my problem I suppose I'll get it fixed eventually.
Maybe, if you can't find an axial lead fuse as a replacement,
you could pick up a cartridge fuse holder and a cartridge fuse.
(It would depend, on the space constraints around where that
fuse is located. Maybe a cartridge just won't fit.)

Radio Shack seems to like cartridge fuses. The axial ones are
probably available somewhere (like maybe Digikey or Mouser).

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102786

To install that with your soldering gun, you can bend a U-shaped
hook on the bare wire ends of the wire, and hook the U around
the legs of the existing fuse (soldering the cartridge fuse
holder in parallel with the existing fuse). By soldering closer
to the body of the old fuse, it might avoid the heat sinking properties
of the PCB underneath. When done, pop a cartridge fuse into the
holder, and screw on the cover. The old fuse is open circuit now,
so its presence won't matter.

Soldering guns have a limited duty cycle. As a kid, I managed to
burn mine out, even though I had read the warning and knew it
had a 20% duty cycle. Soldering guns really can overheat and
die on you. I've always used soldering irons, after that.

If you're looking for a replacement for your soldering gun,
Radio Shack has lower power irons. For general work, I'd
probably prefer a 35W iron, rather than some of their smaller
ones. For SMT, I have on occasion, used a 25W iron in one hand,
and a 15W iron in the other hand (where the 15W iron is used as
a manipulator or "pusher" while getting the SMT component
into place). The low power irons will only annoy, when it
comes to "macroscopic" soldering jobs. The 15W and 25W irons are
fine for the "microscopic" jobs, where you need a magnifying glass
to see what you're doing :)

For bigger work, I really like this one. 80W, and the tip has
held up well. I've even soldered 1/4" copper tubing with this
thing (while building a TV antenna). It puts out enough heat,
that most soldering jobs "can't say no" to it's application.
On a microscopic soldering job, this will lift copper pads,
and I can't use this for everything.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/6/Tools/WeldingSoldering/Soldering/PRDOVR~0586306P/Mastercraft%2B80W%2BSoldering%2BIron.jsp?locale=en

The biggest iron I've ever used, was in shop class, and was a
200W iron for sheet metal soldering. The tip is a bit too big
on those, for this kind of work. And that makes that 80W, the
next best thing.

I like this quote I found yesterday -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Pease

"My favorite programming language is ... solder."

Paul
 
F

Franc Zabkar

I can't see 12v damaging something that uses 27v.
It can if the polarity is different, or if the correct one is DC and
the wrong one is AC.

- Franc Zabkar
 
F

Franc Zabkar

Look for a picofuse. If you have an old motherboard, then you may find
a 1A or 2A picofuse protecting the keyboard port. Alternatively, you
might like to use a polyswitch. These are resettable fuses that
protect the USB ports. Most appear to be rated for 1.1A, but I have
seen some that go as high as 1.7A (IIRC). You may even find one in an
old NiCd or NiMH battery pack.

- Franc Zabkar
 
M

Motor T

Look for a picofuse. If you have an old motherboard, then you may find
a 1A or 2A picofuse protecting the keyboard port. Alternatively, you
might like to use a polyswitch. These are resettable fuses that
protect the USB ports. Most appear to be rated for 1.1A, but I have
seen some that go as high as 1.7A (IIRC). You may even find one in an
old NiCd or NiMH battery pack.

- Franc Zabkar
Thank you sir, I will look around. Since I'm gonna need a 2amp I'll
look for a picofuse.
 
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M

Motor T

Maybe, if you can't find an axial lead fuse as a replacement,
you could pick up a cartridge fuse holder and a cartridge fuse.
(It would depend, on the space constraints around where that
fuse is located. Maybe a cartridge just won't fit.)

Radio Shack seems to like cartridge fuses. The axial ones are
probably available somewhere (like maybe Digikey or Mouser).

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2102786

To install that with your soldering gun, you can bend a U-shaped
hook on the bare wire ends of the wire, and hook the U around
the legs of the existing fuse (soldering the cartridge fuse
holder in parallel with the existing fuse). By soldering closer
to the body of the old fuse, it might avoid the heat sinking properties
of the PCB underneath. When done, pop a cartridge fuse into the
holder, and screw on the cover. The old fuse is open circuit now,
so its presence won't matter.

Soldering guns have a limited duty cycle. As a kid, I managed to
burn mine out, even though I had read the warning and knew it
had a 20% duty cycle. Soldering guns really can overheat and
die on you. I've always used soldering irons, after that.

If you're looking for a replacement for your soldering gun,
Radio Shack has lower power irons. For general work, I'd
probably prefer a 35W iron, rather than some of their smaller
ones. For SMT, I have on occasion, used a 25W iron in one hand,
and a 15W iron in the other hand (where the 15W iron is used as
a manipulator or "pusher" while getting the SMT component
into place). The low power irons will only annoy, when it
comes to "macroscopic" soldering jobs. The 15W and 25W irons are
fine for the "microscopic" jobs, where you need a magnifying glass
to see what you're doing :)

For bigger work, I really like this one. 80W, and the tip has
held up well. I've even soldered 1/4" copper tubing with this
thing (while building a TV antenna). It puts out enough heat,
that most soldering jobs "can't say no" to it's application.
On a microscopic soldering job, this will lift copper pads,
and I can't use this for everything.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/6/Tools/WeldingSoldering/Soldering/PRDOVR~0586306P/Mastercraft%2B80W%2BSoldering%2BIron.jsp?locale=en

The biggest iron I've ever used, was in shop class, and was a
200W iron for sheet metal soldering. The tip is a bit too big
on those, for this kind of work. And that makes that 80W, the
next best thing.

I like this quote I found yesterday -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Pease

"My favorite programming language is ... solder."

Paul
Thanks Paul,
VERY helpful info. As usual I'm saving your advice in my 'Pauls tips
n tricks' folder.
 
P

Paul

Motor said:
Thank you sir, I will look around. Since I'm gonna need a 2amp I'll
look for a picofuse.
Back in the day, when we used those in the lab (picofuse), we weren't very impressed
by their reliability. Initially, we installed them based on the name-plate
rating, but were getting enough nuisance trips, that we started uprating
them by a factor of 5 (use a 10 amp fuse in a 2 amp circuit), and eventually,
stopped using them altogether.

There's some advice on the Polyfuse type, here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettable_fuse

*******

I couldn't read the legend on the PCB there (the photobucket picture),
to see what it says with regard to the rating on the one that was in there.
If the circuit at that point was a higher voltage, then I might want a
regular fuse for the circuit. And distinguish whether they want regular blow
or slo blow as well.

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

Thanks for reply. Here is my fuse:http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f120/EdMc1/PICT0026.jpg
I have a solder gun but I'm afraid its way too big. Since I'm pretty
sure this is my problem I suppose I'll get it fixed eventually.
Check out a Stahl soldering station on Amazon - great price for
piecemeal tiny type stuff. Been doing sub-mini on/on/on DPDT switches
for transducers - takes a fine tip, for sure, and steady hand and I'm
really happy with the Stahl.
 
F

Flasherly

Soldering guns have a limited duty cycle. As a kid, I managed to
burn mine out, even though I had read the warning and knew it
had a 20% duty cycle. Soldering guns really can overheat and
die on you. I've always used soldering irons, after that.
Not my Weller - PRO gun. Two lights in the face and suitable for
plumbing. Not sure its power, but for a $5 pawn shop bin item from
years ago, it cranks it out every time. Huge coil windings, so it
vibrates, too. Free hand massages while you work. Tip's probably
shot - sure like to figure how to make my own. Bigger jobs I've two
stacked Lincolns, stick and wire, 220 and 110, or just soap up the old
tubes before pulling out oxy-acetylene tanks for any reticent PCB
types.
 
M

Motor T

There's some advice on the Polyfuse type, here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resettable_fuse

*******

I couldn't read the legend on the PCB there (the photobucket picture),
to see what it says with regard to the rating on the one that was in there.
If the circuit at that point was a higher voltage, then I might want a
regular fuse for the circuit. And distinguish whether they want regular blow
or slo blow as well.

Paul
The legend on the board reads: F1 T2AL/250VAC (Don't know what it means).
Thanks.
 
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S

SC Tom

Motor T said:
The legend on the board reads: F1 T2AL/250VAC (Don't know what it means).
Thanks.
It's a 2 amp slow-blow fuse rated up to 250v. The "F1" just means that it's fuse #1 on the PCB (even if there is only
one).

If you want, you can use a standard in-line fuse holder: cut the old fuse in the middle so that the only thing left on
the PCB is the wires and the metal fuse end caps. Clean any non-metallic material out of them, then tin the ends of the
wires on the new fuse holder and solder them into the caps (similar to what Paul suggested earlier). That way, you won't
excessively heat up the board with the large soldering iron that you have, and if the fuse blows again, you can (more)
easily replace it.
 
P

Paul

SC said:
It's a 2 amp slow-blow fuse rated up to 250v. The "F1" just means that
it's fuse #1 on the PCB (even if there is only one).

If you want, you can use a standard in-line fuse holder: cut the old
fuse in the middle so that the only thing left on the PCB is the wires
and the metal fuse end caps. Clean any non-metallic material out of
them, then tin the ends of the wires on the new fuse holder and solder
them into the caps (similar to what Paul suggested earlier). That way,
you won't excessively heat up the board with the large soldering iron
that you have, and if the fuse blows again, you can (more) easily
replace it.
I can see a picture of one here, a cartridge style fuse. These should be
available at places like RadioShack. Or even perhaps, a hardware store.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/T2AL-250v-Slow-Glass-electrosmart®/dp/B0036A8O3Q

If you get a fuse holder with wire leads on the end, that can
be soldered to the legs on the existing fuse (in parallel). The
fuse holder unscrews, when you need to change out the fuse.

Paul
 
P

Patrick

Motor said:
Thanks for reply. Here is my fuse:
http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f120/EdMc1/PICT0026.jpg
I have a solder gun but I'm afraid its way too big. Since I'm pretty
sure this is my problem I suppose I'll get it fixed eventually.
The writing by the fuse appears to say; F1 T2AL/250VAC

'F1' meaning fuse1 (maybe an F2 somewhere)

'T' meaning time delay

'2A' being 2amp

'L' meaning it has leads, or it is a manufacturer code;
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070206132852AAdRuPQ

'250VAC' means it is 250volt AC
 
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F

Flasherly

The writing by the fuse appears to say; F1 T2AL/250VAC

'F1' meaning fuse1 (maybe an F2 somewhere)

'T' meaning time delay

'2A' being 2amp

'L' meaning it has leads, or it is a manufacturer code;http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070206132852AAdRuPQ

'250VAC' means it is 250volt AC

Good ol' Zhejiang Co., Ltd. in ol' Wanchai district of Hong Kong.
Yes, sir - wandered down that street on many a pale latern, moonlit
nite. A real slow blow is always nice to know, not everything going
red hot all of a sudden. Although appears it could go several ways:
if 1) a slow blow is acceptable within higher current tolerances, so
stated, 2) a same fast blow, although it wouldn't damage anything, at
worst, might provide intermittent service, whereas if to 3) find
higher tolerances designed within the original part, the same highest
permitted tolerances might be substituted in and matched by a higher
rated fast blow. All things being equal, though, personally I'd bet
on the -L designator as significant to its rating, and not an
arbitrary inclusion to an identifier to associate for a single
manufacturer's make.

http://www.chinaypages.com/sampleroom/onesample/282330847/2A_Glass_Fuse_20mm_X_5mm_T2AL_250V_Time_Delay,_Slow_Blow.html
 

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