AMD SM2+ Socket and heat transfer gunk (Thermal Interface Material)


A

AaronNGray

I have just unpacked my new AMD Athlon 64 x2 with AM2+ socket, and
ASUS
motherboard, but the Fan kit did not contain any heat transfer gunk.

The instructions no where refer to this being neaded, but I have been
using the stuff since my first 386.

Do I nead this, or not. The pamflet for the CPU says it contains lead,
so maybe I am thinking this is a substitute for the gunk.

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron
 
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A

AaronNGray

I have just unpacked my new AMD Athlon 64 x2 with AM2+ socket, and
ASUS
motherboard, but the Fan kit did not contain any heat transfer gunk.

The instructions no where refer to this being neaded, but I have been
using the stuff since my first 386.

Do I nead this, or not. The pamflet for the CPU says it contains lead,
so maybe I am thinking this is a substitute for the gunk.

Ah, try looking at the bottom of the heatsink !

Aaron
 
P

Paul

AaronNGray said:
I have just unpacked my new AMD Athlon 64 x2 with AM2+ socket, and
ASUS
motherboard, but the Fan kit did not contain any heat transfer gunk.

The instructions no where refer to this being neaded, but I have been
using the stuff since my first 386.

Do I nead this, or not. The pamflet for the CPU says it contains lead,
so maybe I am thinking this is a substitute for the gunk.

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron

There are various forms of thermal interface material, of which
the hobbyist thermal paste is just one.

Check the AMD heatsink surface for a pre-applied material.
They usually put something on there, which should be good
for a single installation.

If you take the thing apart over and over again, you may
want to remove the pre-applied material and use your
thermal paste. So for best results, if the AMD heatsink
has pre-applied material, make your first heatsink
installation the final one.

If you're picking up some thermal paste, you could also
try one of these cleaning kits, and see what you think.
The customer reviews will give you some idea how good
it works. I use isopropyl alcohol for cleaning, but that
really isn't the right solvent for the job, and tends
to smear the stuff. While the kit contains two bottles,
one of the bottles does most of the work, and you'll run
out of one, before the other.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16835100010

Paul
 
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M

mcheu

I have just unpacked my new AMD Athlon 64 x2 with AM2+ socket, and
ASUS
motherboard, but the Fan kit did not contain any heat transfer gunk.

The instructions no where refer to this being neaded, but I have been
using the stuff since my first 386.

Do I nead this, or not. The pamflet for the CPU says it contains lead,
so maybe I am thinking this is a substitute for the gunk.

Many thanks in advance,

Aaron


The stock fans supplied with the AM2 CPUs has thermal grease already
on them. On the older Socket A and earlier heatsinks, they used a
thermal pad. On the newer ones, it's actual thermal compound, and
it's already bee applied. All you have to do is remove the
protective covering, and install the CPU.

If you bought the CPU used, the old thermal compound was probably
cleaned off prior to storage. You *DO* need it, you simply use a
small pea sized bead placed in the center of the heatsink, and squish
it down as you install the CPU.

You can buy the heatsink compound at most computer shops. You don't
need to buy the fancy expensive silver or copper laced stuff either.
The old fashioned, white, zinc compound will work just fine.
 

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