2nd build - after 5 years


T

Tom Thompson

Just finished assembling my 2nd build. Consists of an ASUS Z97-PRO MB,
an i7-4790K, the lower half of a Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935, 32Gig
Ram, GTX770 video card and a double fan Thermaltak 3.0 water cooler for
the CPU. Power for the cooler comes from a motherboard USB header and
the cooler fans are run from motherboard fan connectors.

To my relief, system came up initially, passed POST, properly identified
the RAM and SSD and went into the bios. Looked good except the CPU temp
displayed in the bios kept rising. All fans are running (especially the
2 for the water cooler). CPU temp climbs and finally tops out at 88
degrees C. Turned it off and tried again with the same result.

Possibilities: I think the Water cooler pump is running but my hearing
isn't the best and is it adequately connected to the CPU by the thermal
coating provided on the Water Cooler pump head? Didn't want to crank
the screws down too tightly for fear of damage.... Stock cooler still
in the box. Is the stock coated thermal paste on the cooler pump head
reliable? I have built one other system years ago and later updated
the stock cooler to a big tower air cooler with good results. Try stock
cooler?

Suggestions??

TIA

Tom
 
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P

Paul

Tom said:
Just finished assembling my 2nd build. Consists of an ASUS Z97-PRO MB,
an i7-4790K, the lower half of a Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935, 32Gig
Ram, GTX770 video card and a double fan Thermaltak 3.0 water cooler for
the CPU. Power for the cooler comes from a motherboard USB header and
the cooler fans are run from motherboard fan connectors.

To my relief, system came up initially, passed POST, properly identified
the RAM and SSD and went into the bios. Looked good except the CPU temp
displayed in the bios kept rising. All fans are running (especially the
2 for the water cooler). CPU temp climbs and finally tops out at 88
degrees C. Turned it off and tried again with the same result.

Possibilities: I think the Water cooler pump is running but my hearing
isn't the best and is it adequately connected to the CPU by the thermal
coating provided on the Water Cooler pump head? Didn't want to crank
the screws down too tightly for fear of damage.... Stock cooler still
in the box. Is the stock coated thermal paste on the cooler pump head
reliable? I have built one other system years ago and later updated
the stock cooler to a big tower air cooler with good results. Try stock
cooler?

Suggestions??

TIA

Tom

The CPU has throttle and THERMTRIP. If the temperature went
too high, the motherboard will switch off the ATX power supply.
You could be getting a little bit of cooler effort from your
cooler, as without some heat removal, it would switch off.

You need thermal paste between a cooler and the top surface of the
CPU. That helps fill air gaps. The thermal interface material or TIM,
is only there to displace the air in any imperfections. You don't
keep adding TIM materials to "build an Oreo cookie". The TIM is
only there to flush a fraction of a millimeter of air from the
gap, and fill it with tiny boron nitride particles in grease.

Some cooling devices have pre-applied paste. If you remove the cooler
and reinstall it, sometimes that stuff doesn't sit flat. On one of
my coolers years ago, there was phase change material (kinda hard),
which was distorted enough I replaced it with Arctic Silver.

On one of my first builds, the idiotic heatsink had an aluminum
"lip" on the bottom, which conflicted with the lever arm area
and prevented the heatsink from seating. It was tilted. A half hour
of work with a metal file in the basement, removed the "feature", so
the rest of the heatsink could sit flat. Worked fine after
that.

Always check, by viewing from the side, that the heatsink
is flush to the CPU. You can do that with an inspection
mirror. Or if you have a case with a removable tray,
you can assemble the cooler while the motherboard is
outside the computer case. Making it easier to view from
the side, and check for flatness of assembly. If the assembly
won't sit flat, or the fasteners are "too hard to fasten",
figure out why. One of my P4 era coolers, the Intel provided
cooler seemed to have a dimensional problem, and way too much
normal force was being applied to the CPU socket area. I replaced
the retail cooler, with a third party one, and the fasteners
on that worked "normally". No thumb buster on the third-party
cooler.

You can hold your finger against various components in the
system. If the metal of the CPU cooler is quite cold to the
touch, it might not be making contact. I use both digital
temperature readings, as well as common sense finger probing,
to decide whether I forgot to put paste on or something :)

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

Just finished assembling my 2nd build. Consists of an ASUS Z97-PRO MB,
an i7-4790K, the lower half of a Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935, 32Gig
Ram, GTX770 video card and a double fan Thermaltak 3.0 water cooler for
the CPU. Power for the cooler comes from a motherboard USB header and
the cooler fans are run from motherboard fan connectors.

To my relief, system came up initially, passed POST, properly identified
the RAM and SSD and went into the bios. Looked good except the CPU temp
displayed in the bios kept rising. All fans are running (especially the
2 for the water cooler). CPU temp climbs and finally tops out at 88
degrees C. Turned it off and tried again with the same result.

Possibilities: I think the Water cooler pump is running but my hearing
isn't the best and is it adequately connected to the CPU by the thermal
coating provided on the Water Cooler pump head? Didn't want to crank
the screws down too tightly for fear of damage.... Stock cooler still
in the box. Is the stock coated thermal paste on the cooler pump head
reliable? I have built one other system years ago and later updated
the stock cooler to a big tower air cooler with good results. Try stock
cooler?

Suggestions??

88C? That's crazy, hitting on 200F. I mean I've read mixed reviews
on (some) self-contained water coolers, that there's a marginal
improvement over air cooling, and not near in the same league as
convoluted or more, hm, efficient/dedicated water coolers (I'd presume
in a $200US range to start).

If you can't hear it through the air alone, take a screwdriver and put
the tip to the water pump, listening from the protruding bone directly
behind your ear with the handle of screw driver in contact with the
bone. I've also a mechanic's stethoscope if that's not enough.

Nope, no cranking on screws. Snug enough is enough to do their job.

Ah, hah. You've bought a cooler with a film conduction layer already
applied. Personally I don't use them, scrape them off with the edge
of a razor, and apply my own various varieties pastes/heatsink
compounds with the "flat" of the same razor. One of those pencil
width razors with break-off edge tabs for opening boxes or whatever.

Yea, of course the stock is reliable. Why else would a fine
manufacturer of high-quality CPU heatsinks put it on their product, if
they didn't trust you'd praise them, on high, with say yours or
somebody's $800US CPU?

Of course, everybody knows (notably in overclocking forums), they
wouldn't touch an applied manufacturer film with your 10-foot barge
pole. As, everybody knows, a heatsink manufacturer isn't going
anywhere near to covering your CPU burn-out with their product.

Not a bad idea to research heatsinks first from and end-user
perspective is all I'm saying.

Excuse me for saying that earlier, not crazy temps, nor probably near
Intel spec'd for maximum (whatever that may be). As for your CPU, I'd
shoot for optimums I'd established from charts and reviews - such as
this. . .

*
http://www.anandtech.com/show/8227/devils-canyon-review-intel-core-i7-4790k-and-i5-4690k/2

....generally to delve into the world of heatsinks for a decent skew of
people with a positive reception.

My experience is usually outside of better results reported, though I
may not, IOW, have a system as cool as dedicated/extreme
overclockers/users -- I can live within results at some level of
concession, off their skew, for less extreme utilization. For an
instance and motif, air cooling, which I happen to like, at around
130-140F, tops, for that particular CPU well may preclude me, in the
first place to a forgone conclusion that a lower-powered CPU -- one
incapable of drawing 230watts at an additional 10C, more than you, for
*98C when pushed hard -- is better suited my particular needs.
 
T

Tom Thompson

I assembled the same system and had no such issues using the stock cooler.

I have mine on this case.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/produ...41WdKZ55mIQ1U9dEFI5Le_o27-XIVlEn_4aAuVj8P8HAQ

I like the open case so much I am going to use this:

AeroCool StrikeX-Air Black SECC Open Case Computer Case

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...96040&[email protected]:20140809034711:s

Drake.

Thanks Al. That's not a case, its a launch pad... ;<) What kind of
temps are you getting on your stock cooler? Trying to get a comparison
with my first on temps of 88C.

Tom
 
T

Tom Thompson

The CPU has throttle and THERMTRIP. If the temperature went
too high, the motherboard will switch off the ATX power supply.
You could be getting a little bit of cooler effort from your
cooler, as without some heat removal, it would switch off.

You need thermal paste between a cooler and the top surface of the
CPU. That helps fill air gaps. The thermal interface material or TIM,
is only there to displace the air in any imperfections. You don't
keep adding TIM materials to "build an Oreo cookie". The TIM is
only there to flush a fraction of a millimeter of air from the
gap, and fill it with tiny boron nitride particles in grease.

Some cooling devices have pre-applied paste. If you remove the cooler
and reinstall it, sometimes that stuff doesn't sit flat. On one of
my coolers years ago, there was phase change material (kinda hard),
which was distorted enough I replaced it with Arctic Silver.

On one of my first builds, the idiotic heatsink had an aluminum
"lip" on the bottom, which conflicted with the lever arm area
and prevented the heatsink from seating. It was tilted. A half hour

Thanks, Paul. Appreciate the advice and background. The pump/cooler
head has/had preapplied "stuff" on it but with the mechanical attachment
arrangement I am a little unsure if the head is down flat on the CPU. Oh
well, off to Frys this afternoon for some Arctic stuff and try again.
Any preferences for particular paste and technique in the dark art of
paste application and spreading?

Tom
 
P

Paul

Tom said:
Thanks, Paul. Appreciate the advice and background. The pump/cooler
head has/had preapplied "stuff" on it but with the mechanical attachment
arrangement I am a little unsure if the head is down flat on the CPU. Oh
well, off to Frys this afternoon for some Arctic stuff and try again.
Any preferences for particular paste and technique in the dark art of
paste application and spreading?

Tom

In my case, I think I have a tube of AS3, which is quite
old. One tube lasts a long time, if applied in thin coats.

Virtually anything will work, but reading the customer reviews
on the sales page will warn about losers.

1) On processors with exposed components, the requirement was for
"non-conductive" or things that "wouldn't upset capacitance".
Your processor is properly covered, so this is not a concern.
That was an AMD issue, like on my AthlonXP Mobile with the
exposed silicon die.

2) The material must be viscous enough, to not leave the area it is
applied. In the case of LGA sockets, cleanliness is important.
The socket springs "bite" into the lands on the land grid array
processor, so are likely to "bite" through leaking thermal paste.
My least favorite material is zinc oxide in silicon oil, which
leaves the surface in a matter of days. But nobody would propose
that as a proper solution anyway for a CPU cooler. Radio Shack
used to stock that stuff, and I actually did try it on a P4 once.
Not nice.

3) The main component in a lot of products, is boron nitride
particles. They're thermally conductive and electrical insulators,
and are ground into a fine powder and mixed with the thick paste.
Other particles are less important. You don't absolutely need
Silver in a paste. Industrial diamonds also work, and have good
properties (don't know how good they are for the environment).

4) At least one brand of paste, is too thick. Users have trouble
spreading it. That stuff, it behaves like cookie dough, breaks
into pieces and generally won't spread. So that's the other end
of the spectrum compared to zinc oxide (which is typically used
on home stereo products, when fastening the cooler to the power
transistors).

5) On the same web page as the pastes, will be a two-component
thermal epoxy. That is a material used for permanently fastening
things together. When building LED lighting, it's used for
fastening a LED to a heatsink... forever. So you don't want
to be putting that on your project. If your kit comes with
two syringes, you bought the wrong product.

Some examples here. I looked at the Frys listing too, to see which
ones they might have in common. Frys doesn't overlap Newegg very well.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...7788 8000&IsNodeId=1&name=Newegg&Order=RATING

This one for example, the compound appears to be good, but
you don't get a lot of applications from it.

"ZALMAN ZM - STG1"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118010

This one is too viscous and is like peanut butter. Which would
encourage too thick a coating. One reviewer reports you can't
use the "rice grain in the center of the CPU" method. It must
be spread first, to achieve uniform application. The less viscous
ones, you "squash" them and they spread themselves.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835426020

The reviews on the Antec diamond stuff, note problems
deciding how to apply it. Antec tech support suggested not
using the enclosed spatula, but use the "rice grain" method.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835209053

So right now, a small sampling of comments suggests picking
a compound, where the installation method makes sense :)
Since I've been using the same tube of paste for so long,
I don't have a lot of experience with the different types.
Just the PITA of scraping some of the Intel original stuff off.
I could probably get AS5 locally, if I needed to pick up
something after 6PM. The small computer stores would likely
have that one.

Some pastes, they "cure" with time. What that means, is the
organic paste base reacts to being applied, and the
consistency changes with time (gets a bit thicker). The conductive
particles settle into place, a few days after it's applied. You get
a degree or two improvment, after a few days have passed. But if
you're still seeing 88C core temperatures, chances are there is
something quite out of whack with the setup. The heat's not
going anywhere.

The pump should probably have an RPM signal on it, and at least
a three wire electrical connection (+12V, GND, RPM). And that should
allow you to monitor in the BIOS, whether the pump is running.
The fans should also be running on the radiator, but then it
depends on where the radiator is located, as to whether you
can monitor it or not.

Paul
 
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T

Tom Thompson

88C? That's crazy, hitting on 200F. I mean I've read mixed reviews
on (some) self-contained water coolers, that there's a marginal
improvement over air cooling, and not near in the same league as
convoluted or more, hm, efficient/dedicated water coolers (I'd presume
in a $200US range to start).

Cooler was ~$70 US
If you can't hear it through the air alone, take a screwdriver and put
the tip to the water pump, listening from the protruding bone directly
behind your ear with the handle of screw driver in contact with the
bone. I've also a mechanic's stethoscope if that's not enough.

Gotta try that.

Nope, no cranking on screws. Snug enough is enough to do their job.

Ah, hah. You've bought a cooler with a film conduction layer already
applied. Personally I don't use them, scrape them off with the edge
of a razor, and apply my own various varieties pastes/heatsink
compounds with the "flat" of the same razor. One of those pencil
width razors with break-off edge tabs for opening boxes or whatever.

Off to get some Thermal paste this afternoon. If no better I'll try the
stock cooler.
 
F

Flasherly

I just fired it up to be sure and I'm about 40c.

That's one sweet ambiently running i7-4790K with core temps you've
got. Nothing at all like my earliest of dual core P4's (2x 2.6GHz),
running at ambience to the room temperature of 90F with a CoolerMaster
Hyper 212+ attached.

Good enough to a grapefruit-sized air cooler, though I've seen them
grown head-sized in a climate around these parts.

Both computers I have are without one of their side panels.
Compliments as well on your choice of cases. Hadn't seen one before
the NewEgg link - noteworthy and I do kinda like it. (I still use
just one of the larger 200mm fans, throttled reasonably down, in front
of each of my plattered disk arrays;- although I'll do as much even
while running dual-slotted 3.5 HDD SATA docking stations with a cute
little 115V fan from WallyMart.)
 
F

Flasherly

Cooler was ~$70 US

Been awhile since I looked for reviews. They were running anywhere
from sales at $40-ish and up then. Probably would've bitten (hey, I'm
game) if ever I'd seen one reach $30.
Off to get some Thermal paste this afternoon. If no better I'll try the stock cooler.

Or regroup if you don't think the self-contained water unit is going
to cut it. There's a whole generation of seriously new
air/heatwick-action heatsinks out there for a whole new generation of
CPUs I haven't approached. $70 should buy two of them, acceptable
units, at some discount from others commanding $50 or more. To me
it's a potential of two or three, a few degrees off from spending
twice as much for something I may never intend, actually, to run all
that rigorously.

Messes me up, my last one, when culling over Fleabay for everything
that would still fit in my socket AMD2. Settled on a used 80-ish watt
AMD x2 4000 for $15US or something rediculous. Along with a couple
Gig of system memory modules. Heh - the MB chipset's temps now tend
to push 140F. The CPU, meanwhile, I've got cooled with another
oversized aftermarket, though not, per se, a monster-sized
CoolerMaster. Hardly reaches 115F for the most for getting lucky
finding that on FleaBay for a song and dance - $10, I think. Tell
you, I've never skimped on a well-reviewed CPU heatsink setup. Same
goes for MB/PS selections. Keep them sometimes for years and years.
But this MB chipset heat is a new one on me. Never seen one that ran
so high. (SpeedFan software monitoring on a sensor likely for
Gigabyte's onboard Intel video chipset if not one of the CPU's support
bridges.)
 
T

Tom Thompson

I assembled the same system and had no such issues using the stock cooler.

I have mine on this case.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/produ...41WdKZ55mIQ1U9dEFI5Le_o27-XIVlEn_4aAuVj8P8HAQ

I like the open case so much I am going to use this:

AeroCool StrikeX-Air Black SECC Open Case Computer Case

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...96040&[email protected]:20140809034711:s

Drake.

OK, on with the show... went to Frys and purchased

"ZALMAN ZM - STG1"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118010

Removed the water cooler pumphead/heatsink. The original included stuff
appears to have spread out properly. Cleaned/Treated both surfaces with
the Zalman STG and reinstalled. Temp still rises and holds at 88C.
This time (guess I didn't notice the first time) the Motherboard seemed
like it was trying to help buy substantially lowering the CPU voltage.
To no avail.

Whipped out my $6 stethascope but really couldn't tell if the pump was
running. Tried the screwdriver trick that was suggested here as well
but couldn't really tell. Pump is supposed to be getting power from a
MB USB header so I swapped USB headers with the other one I know was
working. No joy.

Next step... Take off the water cooler and install the OEM fan cooler.

Tom
 
F

Flasherly

After running it all day the temp has settled down to 32c. I have had
the A/C running so everything in the room is rather cool. I think it
helps not to have any HDDs. They always keep things hot inside the
standard case. No heat from SSDs though. I'll never use a HDD again
unless it's external and at least USB3.


Heh. I've a stack of them now, platters, somewhere between
10-15TByes. Each in dedicated, thick plastic 3.5 HDD storage cases I
picked up from Singapore. They're great for everything between A-Z.
Been collecting programs so long, it'll take a 175G partition on the
new 250G SSD coming in to hold them. But, I'll get rid of, replace an
ancient 10- or 15-year-old Seagate P_ATA 250G with the new SSD drive.
Still be keeping a 640G plattered WD "between" two SSDs for a
processing/holding "tank." I also regularly stream OS backups from a
legacy DOS boot into as old a Norton Ghost DOS version ("hardening" an
OS only goes so far with my abilities/usages). Gives me a real kick
seeing a well-organized XP restored in 45 seconds;... Whatever might
turn amiss ain't likely to stay that way for long (knock on wood).
Also keep the stored program partition all compressed and well
organized, (indexed off embedded small file descriptors to the tune of
some 250,000 files &then some - whew), so they'll be no more churning
once on a SSD for further manipulations/tweaks.

'Bout time I added another copy of that particular partition, which
the 250G HDD will serve, for backup purposes (my stack of "backup"
DVDs is getting more and more appealing, these days, as a Q80 backup
unit and shoebox full of tapes.)

Got an extra slot. Probably what I need to do is break down and buy a
PCI USB3 adaptor one of these days and try some that action.
 
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B

Bill

Tom, Thank you for sharing your experience. I have been considering
building a system with the same CPU and MB.
While I was reading CPU reviews, the $35 cooler, Cooler Master Hyper 212
EVO came up several times (and leaned
me that way), but I would have guessed that your water cooler solution
would be superior (maybe not?). In any event,
I wanted to thank you and everyone who has contributed to this thread
for sharing his or her experience and knowledge!

Bill
 
P

Paul

Tom said:
OK, on with the show... went to Frys and purchased

"ZALMAN ZM - STG1"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118010

Removed the water cooler pumphead/heatsink. The original included stuff
appears to have spread out properly. Cleaned/Treated both surfaces with
the Zalman STG and reinstalled. Temp still rises and holds at 88C.
This time (guess I didn't notice the first time) the Motherboard seemed
like it was trying to help buy substantially lowering the CPU voltage.
To no avail.

Whipped out my $6 stethascope but really couldn't tell if the pump was
running. Tried the screwdriver trick that was suggested here as well
but couldn't really tell. Pump is supposed to be getting power from a
MB USB header so I swapped USB headers with the other one I know was
working. No joy.

Next step... Take off the water cooler and install the OEM fan cooler.

Tom

I used this as a reference for the water cooler. I don't
know if I got the right model or not.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106220

It strikes me, that the pump intake line would have to be hooked to the
bottom of the cooler. If the radiator was inverted for example,
and the fluid level window wasn't absolutely full, the pump would be
pulling on air. I don't see any visible label in the Newegg pictures,
as to whether intake and outlet are marked or not. Some pumps, the
pump sits in the reservoir, leaving less to the imagination as to whether
the pump has fluid at the intake or not. This kind of hardware
probably isn't "six axis" and so some care must be used to ensure
the thing actually pumps. With your stethoscope, you might hear rotation,
but not be pumping anything.

The design is likely to be similar to my sump pump in the basement.
The impeller has no "suction" capability at all. The impeller
has to be offered fluid for it to work, and can't pull it uphill.
(But it can push it uphill, as long as the impeller is immersed.)
There are pump designs that can pull fluids uphill, but they
wear faster than the sump pump design would. Gear pumps and
piston pumps have more friction.

So I would cast a critical eye, at the physical layout. Does
the pump work if the barbs are pointing down ? Or must the
barbs be pointing up, with the reservoir elevated above
pump level ?

The rate with which the temperature shoots up to 88C, hints
at the thermal resistance or thermal mass involved. If the
processor had no TIM inside (between the silicon die and the
lid), the temperature would hit 88C in one second (before the
BIOS has even painted the screen). If you have a large air cooled
cooling solution, sometimes the metal on that takes half a minute
to warm up. As long as the rate of temperature rise is a bit
slow, it suggests the thermal path isn't broken right at the CPU.
But the heat might not be "leaving the area", if there is no
fluid flow, the hose is kinked, or whatever.

The pump fluid is more than just water. It will include anti-algae
agent (like dissolving copper chloride would kill a lot of
potential organic growth - that prevents the fill window
from getting clouded, or the pump fouled). Without some conditioners,
the water would be a mess after a year or so. I expect this product was
pre-filled, so there is no need to mess with fluids.

Paul
 
R

Rodney Pont

Whipped out my $6 stethascope but really couldn't tell if the pump was
running. Tried the screwdriver trick that was suggested here as well
but couldn't really tell. Pump is supposed to be getting power from a
MB USB header so I swapped USB headers with the other one I know was
working. No joy.

What does the software say the pump and fan speeds are? Since it
connects to USB a header I'm assuming it also comes with software to
monitor the speeds and temperatures. It doesn't have a fan connector
for the pump to go into the CPU fan socket as well does it! Without a
CPU fan speed signal I wouldn't expect it to boot.
 
F

Flasherly

PCI to USB3? Can we say "Bottleneck"? Maybe you might try a network
card. That might even be faster. Maybe if you put one computer on a
shelf it might run down hill to the other one on the bottom. Capillary
action or osmosis might also work. Have you tried a funnel?

Here's 75 people and what they've to say...

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/rocketf...ss-interface-card/1092716.p?id=1218220380458&

Forgot about that smaller PCI-e slot (x4 or x1 - never used it?), so I
should have two instead of one extra. Of course I'd need newer USB3
devices, USB3 pendrives and a USB3 3.5 dual-slotted external docking
station.

How can there be a bottleneck over improvements 75 people are
realizing on older systems for an under-$20 PCI board?

If a funnel will do it for you, that's cool, though don't you think
I'd have a better chance based on those linked reviews?
 
T

Tom Thompson

Tom, Thank you for sharing your experience. I have been considering
building a system with the same CPU and MB.
While I was reading CPU reviews, the $35 cooler, Cooler Master Hyper 212
EVO came up several times (and leaned
me that way), but I would have guessed that your water cooler solution
would be superior (maybe not?). In any event,
I wanted to thank you and everyone who has contributed to this thread
for sharing his or her experience and knowledge!

Bill

Well, Bill, I have spent entirely too much time on the water cooler,
having to drill new hols in the case and all to get it to fit the
case/motherboard. The Hyper 212 you are looking at is very similar to
what I called a Tower air cooler that I have in my 5 year ols machine.
But then I figured that the 4790K would need better so I went for this
one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106220

Current plan is to get the water cooler out of there, install thestock
air cooler and to RMA the water cooler as I really don't think the pump
is working.

Tom
 
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F

Flasherly

It also depends on the motherboard as I tried a PCI-e card in mine and
was unable to get the USB3 ports to funcion. I also tried a USB3 hub
that failed.

10-4, loud and clear. Though I've heard that b4 as well - one of the
first reviews I noticed (on BBuy) was a similar reference to having
went thru other boards with that [in]capacity. Sorry for the
misunderstanding. (I shouldn't be enough of a multitasker to impose on
bandwidth, provided its delivered as stated for SATAIII, albeit later
"kludge" on the PCI architecture and not, better yet, newer dedicated
MB SATA3 chipsets tied more directly/properly to MB architecture.)

(Knock on wood, my MB is relatively old standards, earliest Intel Land
Grid Array & I truly, truly hate mistakes or having to make returns.
Speaking of which, just cancelled my SSD order for another good brand
a oneday flashsale 25% lower than that EVO. Crucial256G/TigerDirect
if interested for shy a bill. Where I got the EVO, cust service is
off for Sunday picnics, so hope I don't get static tomorrow ... Filing
disputes is just great on peons, and not people I happen to like or
merchants I don't care "inadvertantly" or otherwise to piss 'em off
-eh.)
 
T

Tom Thompson

What does the software say the pump and fan speeds are? Since it
connects to USB a header I'm assuming it also comes with software to
monitor the speeds and temperatures. It doesn't have a fan connector
for the pump to go into the CPU fan socket as well does it! Without a
CPU fan speed signal I wouldn't expect it to boot.

I haven't gotten that far, Rod. Haven't yet installed the OS so no boot
or software yet and am looking at the temps and fan speeds in the bios.

Tom
 
R

Rodney Pont

Well, Bill, I have spent entirely too much time on the water cooler,
having to drill new hols in the case and all to get it to fit the
case/motherboard. The Hyper 212 you are looking at is very similar to
what I called a Tower air cooler that I have in my 5 year ols machine.
But then I figured that the 4790K would need better so I went for this
one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106220

You said the power comes from a USB header but the link you posted says
it's a 12v pump. USB only supplies 5v doesn't it? That would mean that
there is a fan connector for the pump that you haven't plugged in so
the pump isn't running.
 
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B

Bill

Tom said:
Well, Bill, I have spent entirely too much time on the water cooler,
having to drill new hols in the case and all to get it to fit the
case/motherboard. The Hyper 212 you are looking at is very similar to
what I called a Tower air cooler that I have in my 5 year ols machine.
But then I figured that the 4790K would need better so I went for this
one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106220

Current plan is to get the water cooler out of there, install thestock
air cooler and to RMA the water cooler as I really don't think the pump
is working.

Tom

Sounds like a good plan. With your GPU, you probably have a pretty warm
case, so I would expect the water
cooled solution to be better. I noticed that the motherboard manual
suggested using a fan on the RAM if
filling all 4 slots or OC'ing.

Bill
 

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