How to unblock one cartridge colour

Discussion in 'Printers' started by Beemer, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. Beemer

    Beemer Guest

    My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently installed
    original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year unused but the
    yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the contacts and soaked
    the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to come out. I do not
    think this is an electrical problem and I actually suspect that the yellow
    ink was a "short fill". Is this a possibility?

    Beemer
     
    Beemer, Aug 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. Beemer

    Beemer Guest

    "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    news:suDyi.60$...
    > My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently
    > installed original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year
    > unused but the yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the
    > contacts and soaked the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to
    > come out. I do not think this is an electrical problem and I actually
    > suspect that the yellow ink was a "short fill". Is this a possibility?
    >
    > Beemer
    >
    >
    >


    Now the cyan has stopped flowing. I'm surprised as I only opened the HP
    cartridge this week. Obviously leaviung these too long unused is not a
    good thing.

    Beemer
     
    Beemer, Aug 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. Some inks and some ink cartridges (containing the head) are particularly
    vulnerable to aging. But all ink cartridges of consequence have a
    manufacturing, or more often, expiration date on it. Some printers will
    simply not even allow an outdated cartridge to operate.

    I have found that yellow ink seems to settle out more commonly (even dye
    ink types), as it seems to precipitate out solids more easily.

    Did you check dates to see how old the cartridges are, and do you know
    how they were stored? Very warm and dry climatic conditions accelerate
    aging, dehydration, and such.

    Most dye inks are fairly alkaline, so using a very dilute amount of
    ammonia (or ammoniated window cleaner out of the bottle may help a bit.
    I would not soak HP replaceable heads in this for more than a few
    minutes at a time, as I don't know how vulnerable they are to etching
    from corrosive liquids.

    Art


    Beemer wrote:

    > "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    > news:suDyi.60$...
    >
    >>My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently
    >>installed original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year
    >>unused but the yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the
    >>contacts and soaked the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to
    >>come out. I do not think this is an electrical problem and I actually
    >>suspect that the yellow ink was a "short fill". Is this a possibility?
    >>
    >>Beemer
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Now the cyan has stopped flowing. I'm surprised as I only opened the HP
    > cartridge this week. Obviously leaviung these too long unused is not a
    > good thing.
    >
    > Beemer
    >
    >
     
    Arthur Entlich, Aug 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Beemer

    Bob Headrick Guest

    "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    news:5ODyi.71$...
    >
    > "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    > news:suDyi.60$...
    >> My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently
    >> installed original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year
    >> unused but the yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the
    >> contacts and soaked the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to
    >> come out. I do not think this is an electrical problem and I actually
    >> suspect that the yellow ink was a "short fill". Is this a possibility?


    > Now the cyan has stopped flowing. I'm surprised as I only opened the HP
    > cartridge this week. Obviously leaviung these too long unused is not a
    > good thing.


    The problem is not a blocked cartridge or a "short fill", but rather air
    that has been ingested into the standpipe of the cartridge. This can happen
    with very old cartridges. There is no "expiration" built into the
    cartridge, but the cartridge does have a warranty date (two years from the
    production date) printed on the cartridge. See:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bua02014
    for information on decoding the warranty date. The package also has an
    "install by" date which is 18 months from the production date.

    To resolve the air problem in the cartridge you could place a damp tissue
    against the printhead, then gently force air through the vent holes in the
    back of the cartridge. (See
    http://www.fixyourownprinter.com/forums/inkjet/26100#27). You could put
    the cartridge in an old sock with the nozzles pointing toward the toe, then
    go outside and swing it rapidly around your head for 30 seconds or so. I
    would not recommend soaking the printhead in Windex as this can cause
    problems in the printhead.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, MS MVP Printing/Imaging
     
    Bob Headrick, Aug 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Beemer

    Beemer Guest

    Art,

    Yes the cartridge was after its stamped date. Using isopropyl alcohol
    causes the non blocked ink to flow very easily. Strange thing was that the
    yellow worked for a day then suddenly stopped. I will try Bob's sling shot
    trick. Meanwhile I bought the last available "41" cartridges in my local PC
    World. Both are already out-of-date but at least the first one is working.

    Beemer


    "Arthur Entlich" <> wrote in message
    news:0_Lyi.77383$fJ5.35462@pd7urf1no...
    > Some inks and some ink cartridges (containing the head) are particularly
    > vulnerable to aging. But all ink cartridges of consequence have a
    > manufacturing, or more often, expiration date on it. Some printers will
    > simply not even allow an outdated cartridge to operate.
    >
    > I have found that yellow ink seems to settle out more commonly (even dye
    > ink types), as it seems to precipitate out solids more easily.
    >
    > Did you check dates to see how old the cartridges are, and do you know how
    > they were stored? Very warm and dry climatic conditions accelerate aging,
    > dehydration, and such.
    >
    > Most dye inks are fairly alkaline, so using a very dilute amount of
    > ammonia (or ammoniated window cleaner out of the bottle may help a bit. I
    > would not soak HP replaceable heads in this for more than a few minutes at
    > a time, as I don't know how vulnerable they are to etching from corrosive
    > liquids.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > Beemer wrote:
    >
    >> "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    >> news:suDyi.60$...
    >>
    >>>My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently
    >>>installed original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year
    >>>unused but the yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the
    >>>contacts and soaked the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to
    >>>come out. I do not think this is an electrical problem and I actually
    >>>suspect that the yellow ink was a "short fill". Is this a possibility?
    >>>
    >>>Beemer
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Now the cyan has stopped flowing. I'm surprised as I only opened the HP
    >> cartridge this week. Obviously leaviung these too long unused is not a
    >> good thing.
    >>
    >> Beemer
     
    Beemer, Sep 4, 2007
    #5
  6. Beemer

    Beemer Guest

    Bob,

    Thanks for the tip! I had to install a new 41 cartridge so I'll wait until
    it is fading then try your slingshot trick!

    Beemer

    "Bob Headrick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    > news:5ODyi.71$...
    >>
    >> "Beemer" <> wrote in message
    >> news:suDyi.60$...
    >>> My HP Officejet 1150 has developed a blocked yellow on a recently
    >>> installed original cartridge. The cartridge had been lying for a year
    >>> unused but the yellow did work when I installed it. I have cleaned the
    >>> contacts and soaked the head in isopropyl but I cannot get any yellow to
    >>> come out. I do not think this is an electrical problem and I actually
    >>> suspect that the yellow ink was a "short fill". Is this a
    >>> possibility?

    >
    >> Now the cyan has stopped flowing. I'm surprised as I only opened the HP
    >> cartridge this week. Obviously leaviung these too long unused is not a
    >> good thing.

    >
    > The problem is not a blocked cartridge or a "short fill", but rather air
    > that has been ingested into the standpipe of the cartridge. This can
    > happen with very old cartridges. There is no "expiration" built into the
    > cartridge, but the cartridge does have a warranty date (two years from the
    > production date) printed on the cartridge. See:
    > http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bua02014
    > for information on decoding the warranty date. The package also has an
    > "install by" date which is 18 months from the production date.
    >
    > To resolve the air problem in the cartridge you could place a damp tissue
    > against the printhead, then gently force air through the vent holes in the
    > back of the cartridge. (See
    > http://www.fixyourownprinter.com/forums/inkjet/26100#27). You could put
    > the cartridge in an old sock with the nozzles pointing toward the toe,
    > then go outside and swing it rapidly around your head for 30 seconds or
    > so. I would not recommend soaking the printhead in Windex as this can
    > cause problems in the printhead.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Bob Headrick, MS MVP Printing/Imaging
    >
     
    Beemer, Sep 4, 2007
    #6
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