Hard drive bling

Discussion in 'Processors' started by Yousuf Khan, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    Yousuf Khan, Jan 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. Yousuf Khan wrote:

    > A transparent hard disk body?
    >
    > "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >

    http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html

    Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are only
    useful in novelty systems that comprise of gaming, overclocking, MP3 servers
    for juveniles, and "bling" for the neon light crowd. Now if WD really wants
    to capitalize on this "clear drive" technology they should install a full
    array of blue blinking LEDs under the clear cover. THAT WOULD BE NEAT!!!







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Folkert Rienstra, Jan 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Yousuf Khan

    Rob Stow Guest

    Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
    > Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >
    >> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>
    >> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >>

    > http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html
    >
    > Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are only
    > useful in novelty systems that comprise of gaming, overclocking, MP3 servers
    > for juveniles, and "bling" for the neon light crowd. Now if WD really wants
    > to capitalize on this "clear drive" technology they should install a full
    > array of blue blinking LEDs under the clear cover. THAT WOULD BE NEAT!!!
    >


    I find SATA drives have negligible performance gains in just
    about everything - but they are still worth it just because they
    allow *much* better cable management.

    Being able to do away with IDE ribbon cables - even if they are
    rounded - is heaven. The longer and far more flexible SATA
    cables can be routed anywhere you want them to go - you can
    guarantee that once you install the drive and route the cable,
    the cable will never be in the way again.
     
    Rob Stow, Jan 20, 2006
    #4
  5. Yousuf Khan

    Peter Guest

    Peter, Jan 20, 2006
    #5
  6. Yousuf Khan

    chrisv Guest

    Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:

    >You guys just keep proving my point


    .... that "Rita" is a troll and anything "she" says should be ignored.
     
    chrisv, Jan 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Yousuf Khan

    Peter Guest

    > Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
    >
    > >You guys just keep proving my point

    >
    > ... that "Rita" is a troll and anything "she" says should be ignored.
    >


    Just put "her" in a blocked senders list or a killfile and be done with it.
     
    Peter, Jan 20, 2006
    #7
  8. Yousuf Khan

    J. Clarke Guest

    Yousuf Khan wrote:

    > A transparent hard disk body?
    >
    > "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >

    http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html

    I've wanted one of those for classroom use for a long time. Every
    manufacturer has made one once in a while but they were specials for their
    sales department and not available to the general public. Nice if I can
    finally go out and buy one. Wish it was cheaper though.

    I did have one in my possession for a while, but it was a 14" IBM that
    weighed something like 80 pounds and when I changed jobs I "donated" it to
    the school where I was teaching, which most likely donated it to the
    landfill shortly after.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 20, 2006
    #8
  9. Yousuf Khan

    hackbox.info Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:39:36 +0100, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04
    <@aol.com>> wrote:

    > Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >
    >> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>
    >> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >>

    > http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html
    >
    > Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are only


    one but - Raptor is a PATA drive with PATA2SATA converter

    --
    I really have no idea what this means. And since I can't install linux on
    it, I'm gonna go back to surfing pr0n.
    the penguins are psychotic / just smile and wave
     
    hackbox.info, Jan 20, 2006
    #9
  10. Yousuf Khan

    Rob Stow Guest

    hackbox.info wrote:
    > On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:39:36 +0100, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04
    > <@aol.com>> wrote:
    >
    >> Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >>
    >>> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>>
    >>> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >>>

    >> http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html
    >>
    >> Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are only

    >
    > one but - Raptor is a PATA drive with PATA2SATA converter
    >


    I thought I read in one of the reviews that the 150 GB Raptors
    have a native SATA controller ?
     
    Rob Stow, Jan 20, 2006
    #10
  11. "Rob Stow" <> wrote in message news:
    > hackbox.info wrote:
    > > On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:39:36 +0100, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04
    > > <@aol.com>> wrote:
    > > > Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > A transparent hard disk body?
    > > > >
    > > > > "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    > > > >
    > > > http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html
    > > >
    > > > Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are only

    > >
    > > one but - Raptor is a PATA drive with PATA2SATA converter
    > >

    >
    > I thought I read in one of the reviews that the 150 GB Raptors
    > have a native SATA controller ?


    So the PATA to SATA convertor is integrated in the black LSI chip,
    so what.

    SATA is PATA with a serializer in front of it.

    Somewhere along the line things have to go to parallel, even if you dump
    the whole PATA idea, so why bother.
    The difference with integrated SATA is that PATA transceivers can be
    passed over and control lines connected directly without the extra need
    for SATA to PATA conversion protocol (is it an IN or OUT command, etc.)
    and no need to setup the PATA interface, to begin with.
     
    Folkert Rienstra, Jan 20, 2006
    #11
  12. Rob Stow wrote:

    > I thought I read in one of the reviews that the 150 GB Raptors
    > have a native SATA controller ?


    <http://www.westerndigital.com/en/index.asp?Language=en>

    <http://www.westerndigital.com/en/products/Products.asp?DriveID=189>






    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 20, 2006
    #12
  13. Yousuf Khan

    hackbox.info Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 18:46:10 +0100, Rob Stow <> wrote:

    > hackbox.info wrote:
    >> On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:39:36 +0100, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04
    >> <@aol.com>> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>>>
    >>>> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >>>>
    >>> http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html
    >>>
    >>> Thanks!!!! You guys just keep proving my point that SATA drives are
    >>> only

    >> one but - Raptor is a PATA drive with PATA2SATA converter
    >>

    >
    > I thought I read in one of the reviews that the 150 GB Raptors have a
    > native SATA controller ?



    http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:...cles/200601/WD1500ADFD_2.html+WD1500ADFD+pata

    my bad

    --
    I really have no idea what this means. And since I can't install linux on
    it, I'm gonna go back to surfing pr0n.
    the penguins are psychotic / just smile and wave
     
    hackbox.info, Jan 20, 2006
    #13
  14. Yousuf Khan

    daytripper Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:53:10 +0100, "Folkert Rienstra" <>
    wrote:

    >"Yousuf Khan" <> wrote in message news:43d10110$-lp.com
    >> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>
    >> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >> http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html

    >
    >A bit late.
    >IBM DFHS Enterprise SCSI harddrives had this more than 10 years ago.
    >
    >And, no Bigotowitz, they didn't have the blue LEDs.


    Earlier than that. The hard drive (code name "Piccolo") used in the service
    processor for the IBM 308X mainframe family used a clear case, exposing
    virtually everything within. That would have been around 1982. At the time the
    head actuator used on this drive was quite novel and seeing it at work was
    spellbinding...

    But no blue LEDs ;-)

    /daytripper
     
    daytripper, Jan 21, 2006
    #14
  15. daytripper wrote:

    > Earlier than that. The hard drive (code name "Piccolo") used in the
    > service processor for the IBM 308X mainframe family used a clear
    > case, exposing virtually everything within. That would have been
    > around 1982. At the time the head actuator used on this drive was
    > quite novel and seeing it at work was spellbinding...


    They had some interesting drives back then.

    The old IBM DFHS drives I remember and numbnuts is referring to are 4GB and
    smaller never had a clear case. Oh, though they were labeled IBM and had
    IBM firmware they were made by Seagate. Maybe it was that other
    manufacturer that made them with a clear case?

    > But no blue LEDs ;-)


    Nope! Nor did they have the abortion known as SATA back then either.







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 21, 2006
    #15
  16. Folkert Rienstra wrote:

    > A bit late.
    > IBM DFHS Enterprise SCSI harddrives had this more than 10 years ago.
    >
    > And, no Bigotowitz, they didn't have the blue LEDs.


    I think maybe you are mistaken as you normally are since this DFHS doesn't
    have a clear cover. I dug one out of the junk box just for you.

    http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2003/eBay/DFHS.jpg







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 21, 2006
    #16
  17. Yousuf Khan

    Del Cecchi Guest

    "daytripper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 16:53:10 +0100, "Folkert Rienstra"
    > <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Yousuf Khan" <> wrote in message
    >>news:43d10110$-lp.com
    >>> A transparent hard disk body?
    >>>
    >>> "Western Digital: Clearly Innovative"
    >>> http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/2006/01/western-digital-clearly-innovative.html

    >>
    >>A bit late.
    >>IBM DFHS Enterprise SCSI harddrives had this more than 10 years ago.
    >>
    >>And, no Bigotowitz, they didn't have the blue LEDs.

    >
    > Earlier than that. The hard drive (code name "Piccolo") used in the
    > service
    > processor for the IBM 308X mainframe family used a clear case, exposing
    > virtually everything within. That would have been around 1982. At the
    > time the
    > head actuator used on this drive was quite novel and seeing it at work
    > was
    > spellbinding...
    >
    > But no blue LEDs ;-)
    >
    > /daytripper


    Actually Piccolo was also used in midrange systems like system/38 and
    system/36. We used to have one we used to hold the door of the
    conference room open. Took it to a technology fair. I could hardly lift
    it. Those things were heavy.

    del cecchi
     
    Del Cecchi, Jan 21, 2006
    #17
  18. Yousuf Khan

    Peter Guest

    > > Earlier than that. The hard drive (code name "Piccolo") used in the
    > > service
    > > processor for the IBM 308X mainframe family used a clear case, exposing
    > > virtually everything within. That would have been around 1982. At the
    > > time the
    > > head actuator used on this drive was quite novel and seeing it at work
    > > was
    > > spellbinding...
    > >
    > > But no blue LEDs ;-)
    > >
    > > /daytripper

    >
    > Actually Piccolo was also used in midrange systems like system/38 and
    > system/36. We used to have one we used to hold the door of the
    > conference room open. Took it to a technology fair. I could hardly lift
    > it. Those things were heavy.
    >
    > del cecchi


    That must be it:
    http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3310.html
     
    Peter, Jan 21, 2006
    #18
  19. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    Folkert Rienstra wrote:
    > A bit late.
    > IBM DFHS Enterprise SCSI harddrives had this more than 10 years ago.


    Those were the big ones inside a round spindle case that you used to
    drop into a mechanism somewhat like a car CD-changer right?

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Jan 21, 2006
    #19
  20. Yousuf Khan

    daytripper Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 20:08:57 -0500, "Peter" <> wrote:

    >> > Earlier than that. The hard drive (code name "Piccolo") used in the
    >> > service
    >> > processor for the IBM 308X mainframe family used a clear case, exposing
    >> > virtually everything within. That would have been around 1982. At the
    >> > time the
    >> > head actuator used on this drive was quite novel and seeing it at work
    >> > was
    >> > spellbinding...
    >> >
    >> > But no blue LEDs ;-)
    >> >
    >> > /daytripper

    >>
    >> Actually Piccolo was also used in midrange systems like system/38 and
    >> system/36. We used to have one we used to hold the door of the
    >> conference room open. Took it to a technology fair. I could hardly lift
    >> it. Those things were heavy.
    >>
    >> del cecchi

    >
    >That must be it:
    >http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/storage/storage_3310.html
    >


    Nah. This was quite a small drive - from memory, the platters were around 6
    inches across. It was bolted inside to the frame about a foot off the floor
    pan, and it was no biggie to heft one...

    /daytripper
     
    daytripper, Jan 21, 2006
    #20
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