XP Setup - Screen turns black after downloading files and Restart


J

JayGee

Hello,

After re-building my computer with
a new MSI motherboard (with AMD Athlon II X2 and 2GB DDR3 1066 RAM) and a
new 500GB hard disk and using only the on-board graphics I can not finish the
Windows XP installation. You can see

HERE (http://sites.google.com/site/jugracamsi/)

some screenshots which I took during the installation procedure. I have an
original OEM licensed Windows XP CD with SP2 which I could install easy on my
old system.

What is wrong?
 
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A

Andrew E.

With many MB & SATA or RAID,you need to install the SATA driver
pressing the F6 option once you boot to xp cd,the drivers should be on
a floppy from the mfg..Also,(quick format) wont work,1st delete partitions,
create one,then let xp format & install..Also,in the BIOS,set 1st boot device
as cdrom with xp,hd 2nd..Also,how does one download files during an
install.
 
J

Jerry

An OEM CD can only be installed once - it is tied forever to the first
system it is installed on and you've chnaged motherboard , etc which makes
it a 'new' system.
 
A

Andy

i have seen OEM cds sold on tigerdirect ect and you can somtimes use them
again if you can convice microsoft to allow you to actavate windows again.



Jerry said:
An OEM CD can only be installed once - it is tied forever to the first
system it is installed on and you've chnaged motherboard , etc which makes
it a 'new' system.
 
X

XP Guy

Jerry top-poasted:
An OEM CD can only be installed once - it is tied forever to the
first system it is installed on and you've chnaged motherboard ,
etc which makes it a 'new' system.
Total hogwash.

Copy the contents of your OEM XP cd to the hard drive and install it
from the hard drive, but first you need to modify this file:

setupp.ini

Read the following:

http://www.thetechguide.com/howto/setuppini.html

====================

The Pid value is what we're interested in. What's there now looks like
a standard default. There are special numbers that determine if it's a
retail, oem, or volume license edition.

First, we break down that number into two parts. The first five digits
determines how the CD will behave, ie is it a retail cd that lets you
clean install or upgrade, or an oem cd that only lets you perform a
clean install?

The last three digits determines what CD key it will accept. You are
able to mix and match these values. For example you could make a WinXP
cd that acted like a retail cd, yet accepted OEM keys.

Now, for the actual values. Remember the first and last values are
interchangable, but usually you'd keep them as a pair:

Retail = 51882 335
Volume License = 51883 270
OEM = 82503 OEM

So if you wanted a retail CD that took retail keys, the last line of
your setupp.ini file would read:

Pid=51882335

And if you wanted a retail CD that took OEM keys, you'd use:

Pid=51882OEM

======================

Here's more examples of Pid numbers. These are taken from the "System
Builder" version of XP-pro (specifically the "2002" version). The
System Builder CD is what small or medium-sized PC builders use when
assembing systems from scratch.

This is from an XP-Pro SP1 CD with files dates March 31, 2003:

[Pid]
ExtraData = 786F687170637175716954806365EF
Pid=55274OEM

This is the same product, except with SP2. These numbers are the same
even for different file or release dates (and even for the last version
which included SP3):

- Aug 4, 2004 (sp2)
- Feb 28, 2006 (sp2)
- April 14, 2008 (sp3)

[Pid]
ExtraData = 786F687170637175716954806365EF
Pid=76487OEM
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

XP Guy said:
Jerry top-poasted:


Total hogwash.

Copy the contents of your OEM XP cd to the hard drive and install it
from the hard drive, but first you need to modify this file:

setupp.ini

Read the following:

http://www.thetechguide.com/howto/setuppini.html
<snip>

Technically correct, but a violation of the licensing agreement. What
you are advocating is piracy.

--
Zaphod

Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
something big and sinister going on in the world.
Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
universe gets that.
 
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X

XP Guy

Zaphod said:
Technically correct, but a violation of the licensing agreement.
No.

The licensing agreement obligates you to only install and use the
software if you have a valid license (and by extension - a product key
that you are using according to the terms of the license).

How you actually obtain a CD containing the code, or any modifications
you make to the installation files, has no bearing on the license or the
EULA.

There are *many* guides and alternate setup schemes (unattended
installation setups) that make significant modifications to the
installation files and the installation process.
What you are advocating is piracy.
Piracy (in the case of Windows OS software) requires that someone ends
up installing and running Windoze in such a way that circumvents
Microsoft's desire or requirement that they buy a license to use the
software.

If someone ends up installing XP and running it on their computer in
such a way that denies Microsoft a license sale, then you can say that
the software was "pirated".

It just so happens that Microsoft no longer offers XP licenses for sale,
so Microsoft is denying itself the opportunity to sell the license - so
no pirating is even possible for software products that are no longer
offered for sale.
 
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Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

XP Guy said:
Yes. The OP upgraded the motherboard in his PC and was using an OEM
version of Windows. The OEM Windows EULA does not allow this, so what
the OP is doing is technically a violation of the licensing agreement,
and therefore, piracy.

The licensing agreement obligates you to only install and use the
software if you have a valid license (and by extension - a product
key
that you are using according to the terms of the license).
Per the EULA, a valid licence for the OEM Windows versions only exists
for the original PC it is installed on. The license does allow
replacement of parts for repairs, but not for upgrades.
How you actually obtain a CD containing the code, or any
modifications
you make to the installation files, has no bearing on the license or
the
EULA.
I was not referring to modification of the files as a violation of the
license, but that the OEM licence is tied to the original hardware.
There are *many* guides and alternate setup schemes (unattended
installation setups) that make significant modifications to the
installation files and the installation process.


Piracy (in the case of Windows OS software) requires that someone
ends
up installing and running Windoze in such a way that circumvents
Microsoft's desire or requirement that they buy a license to use the
software.
Which, per the EULA, is exactly what is happening when one installs
and OEM version of Windows on different hardware than it was
originally installed on, barring repairs.

If someone ends up installing XP and running it on their computer in
such a way that denies Microsoft a license sale, then you can say
that
the software was "pirated".

It just so happens that Microsoft no longer offers XP licenses for
sale,
so Microsoft is denying itself the opportunity to sell the license -
so
no pirating is even possible for software products that are no
longer
offered for sale.
Though this may be a position that can be upheld from an ethical or
moral standpoint, it cannot be upheld from a legal standpoint. Until
there is a law, or legal precedent, that allows "abandonware" to be
distributed/copied/installed in that way, it is illegal to do so and
is piracy. Not that any individuals are ever likely to get caught out
by this technicality, nevertheless it exists.
 

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