Win2k Router Setup


W

Wayne Abruzzo

SCENARIO: Currently have one subnet 192.168.1.0 with Linksys broadband
router 192.168.1.1 and a Windows 2000 domain controller/DHCP server/DNS
server/file server/Exchange server 192.168.1.2 and another dedicated Windows
2000 file server 192.168.1.3.

I have installed a second NIC in the 192.168.1.3 server and gave it an IP
address of 192.168.2.1, connected it to a separate switch, and used the
wizard to configure the server as a Network Router using the default
settings.

No other subnets on the network.

GOAL: Create a second subnet using Windows 2000 server Router to isolate
the traffic on both subnets, move some users from the 192.168.1.0 subnet to
the 192.168.2.0 subnet, and allow the moved users to still access resources
in the 192.168.1.0 subnet (shares, printers, Exchange mailboxes, etc.) and
allow users in the 192.168.1.0 to access resources in the 192.168.2.0 subnet
as well.

QUESTION: Do I need to configure a static route to let the 192.168.1.0
network know about the 192.168.2.0 network and another static route to let
the 192.168.2.0 network to know about the 192.168.1.0 network? If so, what
is the proper configuration for each of the interfaces? For the 192.168.1.3
interface, is the Destination 192.168.2.0 Netmask 255.255.255.0 Gateway
192.168.1.3 and for the 192.168.2.1 interface, is the Destination
192.168.1.0 Netmask 255.255.255.0 Gateway 192.168.2.1?

It seems that whether or not I configure static routes, I can ping the both
NICs in the server (192.168.2.1 and 192.168.1.3) but no other hosts by IP
address on the 192.168.1.0 subnet from a workstation on the 192.168.2.0
subnet with a DHCP assigned address of 192.168.2.10 255.255.255.0 and
default gateway of 192.168.2.1. What am I missing?

Thanks!
 
Ad

Advertisements

H

Herb Martin

Wayne Abruzzo said:
SCENARIO: Currently have one subnet 192.168.1.0 with Linksys broadband
router 192.168.1.1 and a Windows 2000 domain controller/DHCP server/DNS
server/file server/Exchange server 192.168.1.2 and another dedicated Windows
2000 file server 192.168.1.3.

I have installed a second NIC in the 192.168.1.3 server and gave it an IP
address of 192.168.2.1, connected it to a separate switch, and used the
wizard to configure the server as a Network Router using the default
settings.

No other subnets on the network.

GOAL: Create a second subnet using Windows 2000 server Router to isolate
the traffic on both subnets, move some users from the 192.168.1.0 subnet to
the 192.168.2.0 subnet, and allow the moved users to still access resources
in the 192.168.1.0 subnet (shares, printers, Exchange mailboxes, etc.) and
allow users in the 192.168.1.0 to access resources in the 192.168.2.0 subnet
as well.

QUESTION: Do I need to configure a static route to let the 192.168.1.0
network know about the 192.168.2.0 network and another static route to let

Probably. (See below.)
the 192.168.2.0 network to know about the 192.168.1.0 network? If so,
what

Probably not, but maybe.
is the proper configuration for each of the interfaces? For the 192.168.1.3
interface, is the Destination 192.168.2.0 Netmask 255.255.255.0 Gateway
192.168.1.3 and for the 192.168.2.1 interface, is the Destination
192.168.1.0 Netmask 255.255.255.0 Gateway 192.168.2.1?

It seems that whether or not I configure static routes, I can ping the both
NICs in the server (192.168.2.1 and 192.168.1.3) but no other hosts by IP

Configure where? (See below.)

address on the 192.168.1.0 subnet from a workstation on the 192.168.2.0
subnet with a DHCP assigned address of 192.168.2.10 255.255.255.0 and
default gateway of 192.168.2.1. What am I missing?

Yes, mostly HOW the routing paths probably....

Assuming you have this:

Internet =Router= 192.168.1.x =W2KRouter= 192.168.2.x

The above is likely given the order in which you created it but
if that is a wrong guess you can adapt the following suggestions.

All the machines on the 192.168.1.x likely use the Internet
connected router as their default gateway -- which is correct.

This means they know NOTHING about 192.168.2.x

Machines on 192.168.2.x should use the W2KRouter for their
DEFAULT gateway and this will allow them to REACH both
192.168.1.0 (but not receive answers automatically do to the
problem above for the 192.168.1.x machines finding .2.x.)

The Internet Router AT A MINIMUM must be taught about the
192.168.2.x network since his only router is the ISPs as default
gateway.

This is a static route ON THE "Internet Router".

If the W2KRouter uses the Internet Router (just as any other
192.168.1.x machine does) as DEFAULT Gateway, then now
it will work. ***

Those on 192.168.2.x default to the W2k, it either delivers
192.168.1.x directly (it's connected) or sends remaining traffic
to the Internet router which can send it to the Internet, AND
return it to the W2K for delivery back to 192.168.2.x

This means that even the 192.168.1.x machines can reach
192.168.2.x by sending to the Internet Router (their default
gateway) and it will deal with sending to the W2kRouter and
192.168.2.x

But this is obviously inefficient since the same packets will
be sent TWICE across the 192.168.2.x network: Once to
the Internet Router and then back to the W2k Router for
actual delivery on 192.168.2.x

*** For increased (network) efficiency: every machine,
or at least major servers on 192.168.1.x should also have
a static route back to 192.168.2.x through the W2KRouter.

These are individual static routes on EACH 192.168.1.x
machine that will be sending (large volumes) of messages
to the 192.168.2.x network..
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top