VB.Net not building added file


T

tshad

I am using VB.Net 2003 and have added an existing file to my project but
can't seem to get the file to compile and my other file is getting errors
when refering to it.

The file starts out:
*******************************************************
Imports System
Imports System.Data
Imports System.Data.SqlClient

Namespace MyFunctions

' DbObject is the class from which all classes in the Data Services Tier
' inherit. The core functionality of establishing a connection with the
' database and executing simple stored procedures is also provided by
' this base class.
' ---
Public Class DbObject
********************************************************

The file has "MyFunctions" as its' namespace and DbObject as the class.

But in my main file I have the following:

**********************************************************
Imports System.Threading
Imports System.Data
Imports System.Data.SqlClient
Imports System.IO
Imports FtsData
Imports MyFunctions

Module Module1
Dim SqlConnection1 As SqlConnection
Public debugging As Boolean = True
Dim strProgress As String
Dim mutexFile As Mutex
Dim strErrors As String
Dim newPosition As Position
Dim myDbObject As New DbObject
******************************************************

I get the errors:

Namespace or type 'MyFunctions' for the Imports 'MyFunctions' cannot be
found.
Type 'DbObject' is not defined.

Why is this? Why won't it build the added file?

Thanks,

Tom
 
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T

tshad

My mistake.

The file is being built. I looked at the bin folder and found DbObject.dll
there.

What was happening was that I still had to manually add a reference to it.
I would have thought that if the project was building the .dll, it would
automatically know about the reference. Apparently I was wrong there.

Definately not intuitive.

Tom
 
C

Chris Dunaway

My mistake.

The file is being built. I looked at the bin folder and found DbObject.dll
there.

What was happening was that I still had to manually add a reference to it.
I would have thought that if the project was building the .dll, it would
automatically know about the reference. Apparently I was wrong there.

Definately not intuitive.

Tom

If you have the source code for the .dll, dont reference the .dll
directly, instead reference the project. That is the preferred
method.

Chris
 
T

tshad

Chris Dunaway said:
If you have the source code for the .dll, dont reference the .dll
directly, instead reference the project. That is the preferred
method.
How do you reference the probject?

When you add a reference - you need to point at a .dll? I don't believe you
can reference the project.

Thanks,

Tom
 
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C

Chris Dunaway

How do you reference the probject?

When you add a reference - you need to point at a .dll? I don't believe you
can reference the project.

Thanks,

Tom

When you add a reference, choose the Projects tab and reference the
project directly. Here's an older article that discusses the
advantages of referencing the project. Obviously, if you don't have
the project and only have a .dll, you have to reference the .dll.

This link is from Chapter 4, Managing Dependencies

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms998215.aspx

Chris
 

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