using Access 2007 as front-end to SQL Server back-end


T

Tom B.

Are there any good documents or books that give an in-depth explanation of
using Access 2007 as a front-end to a SQL Server back-end?
 
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J

Jeff Boyce

Tom

Could you be a bit more specific about what you're trying to learn? These
newsgroups tend to provide specific suggestions in response to specific
questions/issues.

For example, if you want to get ideas about connecting Access (any version)
to a back-end data source (any source), you could look for information about
"linking".

If you are trying to customize a user-interface to work more efficiently
with a back-end data source (e.g., SQL-Server), are you focusing on forms,
reports, or ???

More info, please...

Regards

Jeff Boyce
Microsoft Office/Access MVP
 
T

Tom B.

Jeff,
Unfortunately, I am unable to be more specific in this question. I have
heard that there were issues with Access 2000 and Access 2003 being used as a
front-end for SQL Server 2000. I have a project coming up where
(specifically) Access 2007 could be used either as a standalone database or
as a front-end to SQL Server. My instinct is to use Access as a front-end,
but I'm not sure if there are known issues with Access 2007 when used in this
manner. I apologize for not having a specific question - it was more just
wondering if anyone could recommend a document or book that covered all or
most aspects of using Access 2007 as a front end to a SQL Server database.
 
A

Armen Stein

Unfortunately, I am unable to be more specific in this question. I have
heard that there were issues with Access 2000 and Access 2003 being used as a
front-end for SQL Server 2000. I have a project coming up where
(specifically) Access 2007 could be used either as a standalone database or
as a front-end to SQL Server. My instinct is to use Access as a front-end,
but I'm not sure if there are known issues with Access 2007 when used in this
manner. I apologize for not having a specific question - it was more just
wondering if anyone could recommend a document or book that covered all or
most aspects of using Access 2007 as a front end to a SQL Server database.

Hi Tom,

Access 2007 makes a great front-end to SQL Server, if you use some
optimization techniques. I have slide deck called "Best of Both
Worlds" at www.JStreetTech.com/downloads that covers the basics for
any version recent of Access.

Armen Stein
Microsoft Access MVP
www.JStreetTech.com
 
R

Rick Brandt

Jeff,
Unfortunately, I am unable to be more specific in this question. I
have
heard that there were issues with Access 2000 and Access 2003 being used
as a front-end for SQL Server 2000. I have a project coming up where
(specifically) Access 2007 could be used either as a standalone database
or as a front-end to SQL Server. My instinct is to use Access as a
front-end, but I'm not sure if there are known issues with Access 2007
when used in this manner. I apologize for not having a specific question
- it was more just wondering if anyone could recommend a document or
book that covered all or most aspects of using Access 2007 as a front
end to a SQL Server database.

If there are issues it is likely only with ADPs and even then only if you
want to be able to design SQL Server objects via the ADP front end.

If you use an MDB with links/ODBC then just about any version of Access
can front end any version of SQL Server.
 
T

Tom B.

Hi Rick,
Thanks for the info.
Tom

Rick Brandt said:
If there are issues it is likely only with ADPs and even then only if you
want to be able to design SQL Server objects via the ADP front end.

If you use an MDB with links/ODBC then just about any version of Access
can front end any version of SQL Server.
 
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T

Tom B.

Hi Armen,
Thanks so much for the lead. I'll check out the article right now. I
really appreciate it.
Best regards,
Tom
 
J

Jeff Boyce

Tom

JOPO (just one person's opinion) ...

I've been using Access front-end to SQL-Server for versions '97, 2000, ...,
2007 (against SQL-Server 6?, 2000, 2005) without incident/issue (other than
the learning curves).

Other folks may have had other experiences.

Good luck!

Regards

Jeff Boyce
Microsoft Office/Access MVP
 
P

pietlinden

Tom

JOPO (just one person's opinion) ...

I've been using Access front-end to SQL-Server for versions '97, 2000, ...,
2007 (against SQL-Server 6?, 2000, 2005) without incident/issue (other than
the learning curves).

Other folks may have had other experiences.

Good luck!

Regards

Jeff Boyce
Microsoft Office/Access MVP

So is the Chipman/Baron book on using Access as a FE to SQL Server
still totally applicable? If not, where? (Sorry, didn't mean to ask
an essay question... was hoping for a shorter answer type!)
Thanks!
 
T

Tom B.

Not sure what the "Chipman/Baron book" referred to below is. Any info on a
title/publisher?
 
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A

a a r o n . k e m p f

I think that trying to use Access linked tables to SQL Server is
****ing pointless.

if you know anything about SQL Server, take a good hard look at
'Access Data Projects'-- these are the most popular format for MS
Access 2000, 2002, and 2003 (I can share my proof of that if you need
to)

File, New, Project (existing Data) will get you setup with a
connection to your existign SQL Server database.

This works better than linked tables-- because everything should be
stored on one SQL Server database anyways-- or even on multiple
databases, on the same server-- they are all automagically linked
together.

This leads to good solid architectures, instead of flaky mountains of
linked tables and DAO with connection strings written in 2000
different places.

This decision is about architecture.

Why don't you go into the SQL Server newsgroups and ask them if you
should put the logic in SQL Server, or the logic in MS Access-- I
guarantee that anyone that knows how to use the worlds most popular
database (SQL Server) will tell you to put your logic into the worlds
most popular database (SQL Server).

Only a ****ing moron would spoil their fancy new ferrari by pushing it
around, instead of driving it around.
I urge you to lose the training wheels--- put the logic in SQL Server,
I mean _DUH_!
I urge you to lose the training wheels--- put the logic in SQL Server,
I mean _DUH_!
I urge you to lose the training wheels--- put the logic in SQL Server,
I mean _DUH_!
I urge you to lose the training wheels--- put the logic in SQL Server,
I mean _DUH_!
 
A

Armen Stein

So is the Chipman/Baron book on using Access as a FE to SQL Server
still totally applicable?

Yes, it has some good techniques. However, it does include examples
of using unbound forms, local data caching and VBA code to manage
concurrency. Those techniques are sometimes necessary, but I find
that most of the time simple bound tables and views will suffice,
along with other optimization techniques in the slide deck that I
mentioned in my earlier post.

Armen Stein
Microsoft Access MVP
www.JStreetTech.com
 
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G

Guest

So is the Chipman/Baron book on using Access as a FE to SQL Server
still totally applicable? If not, where? (Sorry, didn't mean to ask
an essay question... was hoping for a shorter answer type!)
Thanks!
 
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