Remote desktop connection broken ERROR: "The client could not connect to the remote computer. ..."


A

a

I have two computers. Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) worked yesterday from
a campus PC to my home desktop computer (runs XP-PRO, call it #1PC)). Today
it is broken. I tried RDC from my laptop (also running XP-PRO) both at
school and at home (on my local LAN) with the following error:
"The client could not connect to the remote computer. Remote connections
might not be enabled or the computer might be too busy to accept new
connections. It is also possible that network problems are preventing your
connection. Please try your connection again later. If the problem continues
to occur, contact your administrator."

The solutions offered in HELP and Support aren't much, really, actually.

Cause: The remote computer might not be set up to accept remote
connections.
Solution: Try connecting to the remote computer at a later time. If you
receive the same message, contact the server administrator.
It's set up correctly, I double checked.

Cause: The remote computer might already have the maximum number of remote
connections it is set up to accept.
Solution: Try connecting to the remote computer at a later time. If you
receive the same message, contact the server administrator.
No one else is trying to connect, promise.

Cause: Network problems might be preventing the connection.
Solution: Try connecting to the remote computer at a later time. If you
receive the same message, contact the server administrator.
Don't know what this (Network problems) could be, but inside the house, over
the LAN, what could the deal breaker be?

Remote Desktop is enabled (MyComputer -> Properties -> System Properties ->
Remote -> Remote Desktop -> "Allow users to connect remotely to this
computer"

and

The registry (Regedt32) is set up to accept incoming traffic at port 3389.


HELP please.
I don't know where else to look for anomalies
 
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S

Sooner Al

Is the desktop PC using a DHCP assigned IP on you home LAN? If it is and you rebooted the desktop
after the first test its possible the IP changed. I recommend using a static IP for your desktop on
your home LAN to preclude that problem.

Likewise, if your ISP assigns a DHCP IP to your router, its possible the IP changed when the lease
expired. In the case of the public IP changing, try using one of the dynamic DNS services that map
an alias to your ISPs assigned IP address.I use a free service from No-IP.com that maps an alias to
my ISPs DHCP assigned IP address. A small program runs on your PC and contacts the No-IP.com servers
on a periodic basis. The server then maps the IP of your PC to the alias and propagates that over
the public internet. It works very well for me and its FREE....

Go to http://www.no-ip.com for help. Additional like services, some FREE and some $$$$, can be found
on this page...

http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com/ow.asp?Remote_Network_Home/Connections

You would call the remote PC using the alias...Remote access also presumes you have TCP Port 3389
open on any firewall/NAT/router's between the public internet and your home LAN.

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...
 
A

a

Thanks Al
Well,
yes my home pc uses an internally assigned IP from (via DHCP on the
actiontec 1520 router) and my ISP has changed my external IP in the past
(rarely).
This, unfortunately, isn't the problem.
At home, I confirmed the internal IP on each pc and I even checked the
router's table port forwarding, and it was all good.
From campus, I called my roommates, and they confirmed I was using the
correct IP.
Therefore, I'm certain I have the correct IP in each situation.
I don't know if it matters, but with this error, the RDC client fails
immediately, seemingly without ever even looking for the remote computer to
connect to.
Does that help anyone out there? Has anyone else even had this problem?
TIA


Sooner Al said:
Is the desktop PC using a DHCP assigned IP on you home LAN? If it is and you rebooted the desktop
after the first test its possible the IP changed. I recommend using a static IP for your desktop on
your home LAN to preclude that problem.

Likewise, if your ISP assigns a DHCP IP to your router, its possible the IP changed when the lease
expired. In the case of the public IP changing, try using one of the dynamic DNS services that map
an alias to your ISPs assigned IP address.I use a free service from
No-IP.com that maps an alias to
 
S

Sooner Al

Well, I suppose its possible that your school is blocking TCP Port 3389 outbound. You would need to
contact the local network administrators about that .One way to test the router is to do this telnet
test using the IP of the router. You need to test this from a remote location or dial into the
internet using a laptop, etc.

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q187628

The bottom line though, is if you can not connect over your home LAN then its also possible Remote
Desktop is not enabled on the PC. Have you checked to see if RD is actually listening on TCP Port
3389 on the host PC? On the host XP Pro machine go to "Start -> Run", type 'cmd' (without the
quotes). At the command line type the command 'netstat -a' (without the quotes). Look for a line
like this.

TCP <Your PC>:3389 <Your PC>:0 LISTENING

For example on my XP Pro desktop, Ashtabula, the line looks like this using the default port 3389.

TCP ashtabula:3389 ashtabula:0 LISTENING

The line should be present...If the Remote Desktop host is not running, then you will not see a line
like that and you will not be able to connect. If you run services.msc on the target machine is the
"Terminal Services" service started? Also, check the Event log to see if anything stands out when
you try to connect.

--
Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual benefit of all of us...
The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights...
 
S

s

Hey.
Got an answer that is sadder than it is enlightening.
I never mentioned that I just installed xp onto the laptop.
Thought a little about it and it seems like I installed the exact same
xp-pro disk on the laptop as was installed on my desktop.
I own three copies, so now I have different copies on each computer and
all is well
Al thanks for the help.
Later
 
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J

Jeffrey Randow (MVP)

That shouldn't have made a difference... Maybe the new
install/upgrade helped the situation...

Jeffrey Randow (Windows Net. & Smart Display MVP)
(e-mail address removed)

Please post all responses to the newsgroups for the benefit
of all USENET users. Messages sent via email may or may not
be answered depending on time availability....

Remote Networking Technology Support Site -
http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com
Windows XP Expert Zone - http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
 
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