Regular expressions


G

Guest

Hello,

The snippet of code below builds a new string "Newval" based on the pattern
[A-Z]
and that works fine but what if I wanted to exclude values .
For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?

With RegExp
.Global = True
.Pattern = "[A-Z]"
End With
Set Myrange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:A10")
For Each C In Myrange
newval = ""
Set Collection = RegExp.Execute(C.Value)
For Each RegMatch In Collection
newval = newval & RegMatch
Next
Next


D
 
D

Dick Kusleika

For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?
.Pattern = "[^)(*&\^]"

Note the \ that precedes the second ^. The first ^ defines the character
sequence as negative and the \ escapes the second ^ so it's included in the
negative character sequence.
 
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R

Ron Rosenfeld

Hello,

The snippet of code below builds a new string "Newval" based on the pattern
[A-Z]
and that works fine but what if I wanted to exclude values .
For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?

With RegExp
.Global = True
.Pattern = "[A-Z]"
End With
Set Myrange = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:A10")
For Each C In Myrange
newval = ""
Set Collection = RegExp.Execute(C.Value)
For Each RegMatch In Collection
newval = newval & RegMatch
Next
Next


D
Perhaps you just need to negate the character class:

"[^)(*&^]"

which translates as:

Match a single character NOT present in the list
")(*&^"


--ron
 
R

Ron Rosenfeld

For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?
.Pattern = "[^)(*&\^]"

Note the \ that precedes the second ^. The first ^ defines the character
sequence as negative and the \ escapes the second ^ so it's included in the
negative character sequence.
I don't believe there is any need to escape the ^ in VBScript. Both by
testing, and by documentation, it seems to be unnecessary.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ta6y6h4z.aspx

"If the caret character appears in any other position within the list, it
matches itself, that is, it has no special meaning. "


--ron
 
R

Ron Rosenfeld

For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?
.Pattern = "[^)(*&\^]"

Note the \ that precedes the second ^. The first ^ defines the character
sequence as negative and the \ escapes the second ^ so it's included in the
negative character sequence.
I don't believe there is any need to escape the ^ in VBScript. Both by
testing, and by documentation, it seems to be unnecessary.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ta6y6h4z.aspx

"If the caret character appears in any other position within the list, it
matches itself, that is, it has no special meaning. "


--ron
Of course, that only applies when the ^ appears within brackets as other than
the first character.
--ron
 
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D

Dick Kusleika

For example I could set a pattern of "[)(*&^]" how would I code it to
exclude those values?
.Pattern = "[^)(*&\^]"

Note the \ that precedes the second ^. The first ^ defines the character
sequence as negative and the \ escapes the second ^ so it's included in the
negative character sequence.
I don't believe there is any need to escape the ^ in VBScript. Both by
testing, and by documentation, it seems to be unnecessary.

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ta6y6h4z.aspx

"If the caret character appears in any other position within the list, it
matches itself, that is, it has no special meaning. "
Ron: You're right. Mine was actually excluding the slash too. Thanks for
the correction.
 

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