Power supply for Intel 850GB motherboard

  • Thread starter Abhishek Srivastava
  • Start date

A

Abhishek Srivastava

Hi all,

I'm still using a computer that I assembled around 5 yrs back. It has a
1.4 GHz P4 processor and an Intel 850 GB board. The problem is that the
Power Supply stopped working a few days back. I went to hunt for it in
the hardware stores here and none of them have the obsolete power
supply anymore.

Somebody told me that I can use the same Power Supply Unit that is
being used in the contemporary systems.

The only problem is that the 850 GB board had to be supplied power
through 3 connectors(One for the board, one for the processor and one
which seems to be or the IDE controllers, pls correct me if I'm wrong).
The latest power supply units have only two power connectors for the
board, and the one for the IDE controllers seems to be missing.

Can I use a new power supply unit for my board?

Any help will be greatly appreciated as Intel has stopped supporting my
board.

Thanks,
Abhishek Srivastava
 
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M

Mike T.

Abhishek Srivastava said:
Hi all,

I'm still using a computer that I assembled around 5 yrs back. It has a
1.4 GHz P4 processor and an Intel 850 GB board. The problem is that the
Power Supply stopped working a few days back. I went to hunt for it in
the hardware stores here and none of them have the obsolete power
supply anymore.

Somebody told me that I can use the same Power Supply Unit that is
being used in the contemporary systems.

The only problem is that the 850 GB board had to be supplied power
through 3 connectors(One for the board, one for the processor and one
which seems to be or the IDE controllers, pls correct me if I'm wrong).
The latest power supply units have only two power connectors for the
board, and the one for the IDE controllers seems to be missing.

Can I use a new power supply unit for my board?

Any help will be greatly appreciated as Intel has stopped supporting my
board.

Thanks,
Abhishek Srivastava
It seems you have four choices:
1) Search for the exact model number of power supply on ebay. You might be
surprised to find a new one, reasonably priced.
2) If you can find the specs. of the third connector, you could always cut
that connector off of the old power supply, and splice it onto any new power
supply. Power supplies generally supply +12V, +5V or +3.3V. So if you can
find out what voltage is on what cable of the third connector, it should be
easy to find a source of that voltage (and ground) to tap into, on any
current power supply.
3) Kind of a long-shot, but you might be able to find an adapter to hook up
to any current power supply to give you the 3rd connector you need.
4) Best suggestion: Considering the age of the system, it is likely that
it won't last much longer, even if you do happen to get it powered up again.
I'd suggest you replace it with a cheap barebone system, one with onboard
video if your current video adapter is too old to be supported by current
mainboards. This might not cost much more than a decent power supply
anyway. One example follows, just add RAM and move your disk drives into
the new case:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2456829&Sku=G452-2548 E
 
S

spodosaurus

Abhishek said:
Hi all,

I'm still using a computer that I assembled around 5 yrs back. It has a
1.4 GHz P4 processor and an Intel 850 GB board. The problem is that the
Power Supply stopped working a few days back. I went to hunt for it in
the hardware stores here and none of them have the obsolete power
supply anymore.

Somebody told me that I can use the same Power Supply Unit that is
being used in the contemporary systems.

The only problem is that the 850 GB board had to be supplied power
through 3 connectors(One for the board, one for the processor and one
which seems to be or the IDE controllers, pls correct me if I'm wrong).
The latest power supply units have only two power connectors for the
board, and the one for the IDE controllers seems to be missing.

Can I use a new power supply unit for my board?

Any help will be greatly appreciated as Intel has stopped supporting my
board.

Thanks,
Abhishek Srivastava
If its a standard ATX board the new ATX power supplies will still work
with it. They have more wires but the four extra pins on the end should
just slide off (they do on my Antec PSUs for my VIA chipset based
boards). I'm not sure what you mean about a third plug for the
motherboard: ATX only ever had two to my recollection, and not all even
had this! The main (long, two rows) one and the four pin add on for some
boards (P4 boards only?). Each hard disk has its own connection, but
these go directly to the disks, not the board.

Regards,

Ari


--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
P

Paul

Abhishek said:
Hi all,

I'm still using a computer that I assembled around 5 yrs back. It has a
1.4 GHz P4 processor and an Intel 850 GB board. The problem is that the
Power Supply stopped working a few days back. I went to hunt for it in
the hardware stores here and none of them have the obsolete power
supply anymore.

Somebody told me that I can use the same Power Supply Unit that is
being used in the contemporary systems.

The only problem is that the 850 GB board had to be supplied power
through 3 connectors(One for the board, one for the processor and one
which seems to be or the IDE controllers, pls correct me if I'm wrong).
The latest power supply units have only two power connectors for the
board, and the one for the IDE controllers seems to be missing.

Can I use a new power supply unit for my board?

Any help will be greatly appreciated as Intel has stopped supporting my
board.

Thanks,
Abhishek Srivastava
In the picture here, it looks like the board uses an ATX pre 2.0 supply.
Your motherboard has a 20 pin main power connector, a 2x2 ATX12V connector
for the processor, and other cables that power hard drives or CDROM etc.

http://prohardver.hu/html/lap/850gb/d850gb.png

Some of the ATX 2.0+ supplies have a 24 pin connector, and four of
the pins unsnap, so the supply will also work with a 20 pin motherboard.
It is also possible to plug a 24 pin connector into a 20 pin motherboard,
as long as there is room for the four extra pins to hang over one end.
That won't work in your case, since there are objects on either end of
the main power connector that would get in the way of the extra pins.
An ATX 2.0+ supply with detachable pins on the 24 pin connector, should
work OK, as the resulting 20 pin section will fit perfectly.

Here are some specs for ATX supplies. The first two specs are similar
to the supply you have currently. The third spec is what you are likely
to find in the shops.

http://web.archive.org/web/20030424061333/http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/atx/ATX_ATX12V_PS_1_1.pdf
http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/atx/ATX12V_1_3dg.pdf
http://www.formfactors.org/developer\specs\ATX12V_PSDG_2_2_public_br2.pdf

First, compare page 27 of the first spec, to page 29 of the second spec.
The -5V signal on the connector was made optional at some point, and
there is not a lot of good reasons for a motherboard to need -5V.
Occasionally, there are motherboards that still draw a tiny amount
of current from that signal, and for those motherboards, a supply that
has no wire connected to pin 18 might be a problem. I hope this won't
be a problem for you.

Page 36 of the third spec shows a modern dual output supply. As long
as the four extra pins on the 24 pin connector can be unclipped, you
should be able to use one of those supplies. Note that, with the
use of SATA drives, there may be fewer connectors that you can use
with your ribbon cable based hard drives.

Your processor draws about 55 watts:

http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sSpec=SL4WS

If using an ATX 2.0+ supply, the CPU current comes from 12V2.
The 55 watts of the processor is (55W/12V)*(1/0.90) = 5.09A
from 12V2. The 0.90 factor assumes the Vcore conversion on
the motherboard is 90% efficient. I expect a lot of ATX 2.0+
supplies will be able to manage the 5A loading.

I guess I could clarify the difference a bit. With a pre 2.0
supply, there was one output signal for +12V that drives all
the 12V wiring. Typically, I might recommend to a person they
get a 12V @ 15A rating (as printed on the label on the side
of the supply), as a good minimum for a P4 system. Your computer
uses 5A for the processor, and will use maybe 3-4 more amps
for hard drives, fans, CDROM etc. You can see that 15A should
be a reasonably generous spec for your system. (Maybe you'd find
that kind of support on a 300-350W supply. Check the label to be
sure.)

The ATX 2.0 supplies split the 12V output. They use one circuit
to power the processor via the 2x2 square connector. That is
12V2. They use 12V1 to power hard drives, the motherboard 12V wire,
and any other 12V loads. The label will list two ratings like
12V1 @ 8A and 12V2 @ 7A. The total is still 15A, but the current
is segregated to two output circuits. If using one of those
ATX 2.0 supplies (with the removable 4 pins on the 24 pin connector),
you'd be checking for a supply with at least 5A on 12V2, and
at least as many amps for 12V1 (to run hard drives). Many of
the true ATX 2.0+ supplies will supply more current than this,
so even if you blindly just buy one, I bet it will work.

So you can use a number of ATX power supplies to solve the problem.
If your board really needs the -5V on pin 18, that could be
a problem. But otherwise, if you get either an older 20 pin,
or a modern 24 pin (with removable 4 pin section), you should
be able to use your computer again.

Paul
 
R

Rod Speed

Abhishek Srivastava said:
I'm still using a computer that I assembled around 5 yrs back. It has a
1.4 GHz P4 processor and an Intel 850 GB board. The problem is that
the Power Supply stopped working a few days back. I went to hunt for
it in the hardware stores here and none of them have the obsolete
power supply anymore.
Somebody told me that I can use the same Power Supply Unit
that is being used in the contemporary systems.

The only problem is that the 850 GB board had to be supplied power
through 3 connectors(One for the board, one for the processor and one
which seems to be or the IDE controllers, pls correct me if I'm wrong).
Most likely it has a 20 pin main power connector, a square 4 pin
connector that supplys 12V for the cpu, and the older 6 pin aux
connector, 6 pins in one linear row. That has extra 3.3V and 5V lines.
That last isnt for the IDE controllers.
The latest power supply units have only two power connectors for
the board, and the one for the IDE controllers seems to be missing.
Yes, that 6 pin aux power connector isnt used much anymore.
Can I use a new power supply unit for my board?
Nope.

You can still get power supplys with that 6 pin aux power connector.
 
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R

Rod Speed

It seems you have four choices:
5 actually.
1) Search for the exact model number of power supply on ebay. You might be surprised to find a
new one, reasonably priced.
No need to get that one exactly, just another that has the 6 pin aux power connector.
2) If you can find the specs. of the third connector, you could
always cut that connector off of the old power supply, and splice it
onto any new power supply. Power supplies generally supply +12V, +5V or +3.3V. So if you can
find out what voltage is on what cable of the third connector, it should be easy to find a source
of that
voltage (and ground) to tap into, on any current power supply.
It would be stupid to go that route, there are still power
supplys which have the older 6 pin aux power connector.
3) Kind of a long-shot, but you might be able to find an adapter to hook up to any current power
supply to give you the 3rd connector you need.
4) Best suggestion:
Nope. The best suggestion is actually 5) buy a power
supply which has that 6 pin aux power connector.
Considering the age of the system, it is likely that it won't last much longer, even if you do
happen to get it powered up again.
Oh bullshit.
I'd suggest you replace it with a cheap barebone system, one with onboard video if your current
video adapter is too
old to be supported by current mainboards. This might not cost much more than a decent power
supply anyway.
More bullshit.
One example follows, just add RAM and move your disk drives into the new case:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2456829&Sku=G452-2548 E
Lot more expensive than a power supply which has that 6 pin aux power connector.
 
R

Rod Speed

If its a standard ATX board the new ATX power supplies will still work with it.
Nope, new ATX supplys usually dont have the 6 pin aux power connector anymore.
They have more wires but the four extra pins on the end should just slide off
Some do, plenty dont, and that wont help in his case anyway.
(they do on my Antec PSUs for my VIA chipset based boards). I'm not sure what you mean about a
third plug for the motherboard: ATX only ever had two to my recollection,
Nope, you're forgetting about the 6 pin aux power connector.
and not all even had this! The main (long, two rows) one and the four pin add on for some boards
(P4 boards only?).
And the 6 pin aux power connector showed up before that 4 pin square connector did.
 
J

John Doe

A hyperactive troll


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From: "Rod Speed" <rod.speed.aaa gmail.com>
Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Subject: Re: Power supply for Intel 850GB motherboard
Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2006 11:55:26 +1000
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Mike T. said:
Abhishek Srivastava <abhishek.srivastava78 gmail.com> wrote
It seems you have four choices:
5 actually.
1) Search for the exact model number of power supply on ebay. You might be surprised to find a
new one, reasonably priced.
No need to get that one exactly, just another that has the 6 pin aux power connector.
2) If you can find the specs. of the third connector, you could
always cut that connector off of the old power supply, and splice it
onto any new power supply. Power supplies generally supply +12V, +5V or +3.3V. So if you can
find out what voltage is on what cable of the third connector, it should be easy to find a source
of that
voltage (and ground) to tap into, on any current power supply.
It would be stupid to go that route, there are still power
supplys which have the older 6 pin aux power connector.
3) Kind of a long-shot, but you might be able to find an adapter to hook up to any current power
supply to give you the 3rd connector you need.
4) Best suggestion:
Nope. The best suggestion is actually 5) buy a power
supply which has that 6 pin aux power connector.
Considering the age of the system, it is likely that it won't last much longer, even if you do
happen to get it powered up again.
Oh bullshit.
I'd suggest you replace it with a cheap barebone system, one with onboard video if your current
video adapter is too
old to be supported by current mainboards. This might not cost much more than a decent power
supply anyway.
More bullshit.
One example follows, just add RAM and move your disk drives into the new case:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2456829&Sku=G452-2548 E
Lot more expensive than a power supply which has that 6 pin aux power connector.
 
A

Abhishek Srivastava

Hi all,

I really appreciate the inputs provided by everybody. Thanks a ton!
Paul, your reply was indeed comprehensive. Special thanks to you.

I've got the computer working. I bought a new 400 watts Power Supply
Unit and plugged it in. I have left the socket next where the IDE
cables go into the board unconnected. The system is working. Or should
I say so far so good? ;)

Im actually wondering why it's working. If the socket does not need to
be connected, why is it there in the first place? Will I have a problem
with my disk drives (HDD and DVD writer) when the system goes into
standby mode or wakes up from it?

Thanks and Regards,
Abhishek Srivastava
 
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R

Rod Speed

Abhishek Srivastava said:
Abhishek Srivastava <abhishek.srivastava78 gmail.com> wrote
I've got the computer working. I bought a new 400 watts
Power Supply Unit and plugged it in. I have left the socket
next where the IDE cables go into the board unconnected.
Why ? Was that because the power supply doesnt have that connector ?
The system is working. Or should I say so far so good? ;)
Im actually wondering why it's working. If the socket does
not need to be connected, why is it there in the first place?
Good question. It may have just been a conservative approacy by Intel.

That connector has a couple of extra 3.3V lines and one extra 5V line.

The most likely thing is that you may have marginally more
load on those lines in the 20 pin main power connector.
Will I have a problem with my disk drives (HDD and DVD writer)
when the system goes into standby mode or wakes up from it?
No, there is no relevance to the location next to the IDE connectors.
 
P

Paul

Hi all,

I really appreciate the inputs provided by everybody. Thanks a ton!
Paul, your reply was indeed comprehensive. Special thanks to you.

I've got the computer working. I bought a new 400 watts Power Supply
Unit and plugged it in. I have left the socket next where the IDE
cables go into the board unconnected. The system is working. Or should
I say so far so good? ;)

Im actually wondering why it's working. If the socket does not need to
be connected, why is it there in the first place? Will I have a problem
with my disk drives (HDD and DVD writer) when the system goes into
standby mode or wakes up from it?

Thanks and Regards,
Abhishek Srivastava[/QUOTE]

http://prohardver.hu/html/lap/850gb/d850gb.png
ftp://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/d850gb/A2608002.pdf

I completely forgot about that 1x6 Aux connector :)

The 3.3V and 5V pins on the Aux connector, work in parallel with
the 3.3V and 5V pins on the main power connector. If the
motherboard designers expectations were, that something would
be drawing more 3.3V and 5V, then plugging in the Aux would be
a good idea.

On a 20 pin connector, there are four +5VDC and three +3.3VDC pins.
Each pin carries a max of 6 amps, to avoid overheating. That
means the main cable can carry +5VDC @ 24A and +3.3VDC at 18A.
The current only flows if something on the motherboard is using
it.

The Aux connector has one +5VDC pin and two +3.3VDC pins. The
metal pin used on Aux is different than the other Molex connectors,
and I don't know the current limit right off hand. But those
pins would increase the allowable current above the
24A and 18A if just the main connector was connected.

The D850GB has an AGP Pro50 (50 watt) video card connector, and
if you used an (obscure) AGP Pro card, that can increase the power
consumption drawn through the main power connectors. If you
had a high power video card, that would be the time to connect
the 1x6 connector. But while I tried to work through the numbers
here, I don't have anything concrete to offer, as I don't know
which rail the motherboard uses to run the Rambus memory.

http://groups.google.ca/group/alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus/browse_frm/thread/3fac3d581951a064/54d84e3eed3f956e

If you look in section 2.11.1 of the Intel A2608002.pdf manual
above, the power draw numbers there are ridiculously low. (They
use a minimal configuration, and the info is kinda useless, like
many similar tables in the other Intel manuals.) It would seem
from that info, that it would be pretty hard to burn the main
connector on the motherboard, even with a 50W video card plugged
in. Finding good data on RIMMs, and accounting for four of
them, might make a bit of difference to the calculation.

Paul
 
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R

Ron Cli Born

YMMV, But IMH experience, I had a power supply that just stopped
working. No smoke and fire, no popping, no 21 gun salute. Just
stopped. That was back when I didn't know CRAP as opposed to the fact
that NOW I know CRAP ( crap as in nothing.)
So I replaced the PS and for Grins and giggles I took apart the "bad"
PS. I found a blown glass fuse. 25 cents to replace the fuse, $80
for a new PS. As I said, YMMV, but it wouldn't hurt to look.

RoNiN
 

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