Partition Size Limit for Fat32


C

casey.o

I just removed the partition on a 640G external HDD, which was NTFS.
This is intended to be a backup drive, so I want it to be Fat32 so I can
access it from any OS, including Win98 and Dos.

I decided that a 640G partition is too big, if for no other reason, I
tend to update the backup, and a huge drive like that can get real
fragmented. I wanted to just split it on half (TWO 320G). But when I
select Fat32, I can only format a partition of 196.6G. Apparently that
must be the limit for Fat32. Is this right, or am I missing something
or doing something wrong?

Note: Windows XP Computer management / Disk Management would not even
give me the option to use Fat32, so I'm now using Partition Magic.

Using this size partition, I'm forced to put 4 partitions on this drive.
Three are 196.6 and the last one is about 20G.

Thanks
 
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M

Mayayana

The biggest I have is 214 GB. I don't know if there's
a limit. I do know that if you use XP disk management
it will refuse to make FAT32 partitions bigger than
something like 32 GB. I don't know what the 196 GB
number might be caused by. Maybe an old version
of PM? (I use BootIt for all disk operations.) As far
as I know all of the Powerquest software was bought
by Symantec and ruined many years ago. It sounds
like you may be overdue to update your disk software.


|I just removed the partition on a 640G external HDD, which was NTFS.
| This is intended to be a backup drive, so I want it to be Fat32 so I can
| access it from any OS, including Win98 and Dos.
|
| I decided that a 640G partition is too big, if for no other reason, I
| tend to update the backup, and a huge drive like that can get real
| fragmented. I wanted to just split it on half (TWO 320G). But when I
| select Fat32, I can only format a partition of 196.6G. Apparently that
| must be the limit for Fat32. Is this right, or am I missing something
| or doing something wrong?
|
| Note: Windows XP Computer management / Disk Management would not even
| give me the option to use Fat32, so I'm now using Partition Magic.
|
| Using this size partition, I'm forced to put 4 partitions on this drive.
| Three are 196.6 and the last one is about 20G.
|
| Thanks
|
 
C

casey.o

The biggest I have is 214 GB. I don't know if there's
a limit. I do know that if you use XP disk management
it will refuse to make FAT32 partitions bigger than
something like 32 GB. I don't know what the 196 GB
number might be caused by. Maybe an old version
of PM? (I use BootIt for all disk operations.) As far
as I know all of the Powerquest software was bought
by Symantec and ruined many years ago. It sounds
like you may be overdue to update your disk software.
Thats right about Partition Magic and Symantec.
But it really should work for the OSs I'm using. I was released during
the XP era, and when people still used Win98 and 2000. There is NO
upgrade, version 8 pf PM was the last,

Disk management is a piece of shit. It almost forces you to use NTFS.
Typical of MS to force people to use their crap. NTFS is only used on
Microsoft's NT based OSs. No ther systems can read it, including Mac,
Linux, etc. Fat32 is much more universal.

Where do you get BOOTIT?

Thanks
 
C

casey.o

FAT32 goes to 2.2TB.

Using Disk Management, make an NTFS partition. Assign it
the drive letter of your choice.

Then use the Ridgecrop Formatter, and it will
make FAT32 for you.

http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm?fat32format.htm

http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/download/fat32format.zip

fat32format f:

Holy shit, that file is so small I didn't even see it download.....
I'll give it a try. I just want two 320G partitions.

And that tool is how I get FAT32 partitions larger than
32GB or whatever the Microsoft "limit" is. Microsoft limits
the size, because of their notion of the practicality.

The SVI folder potentially serves more than one purpose.
It holds System Restore info. But it might also be
used by VSS during backup runs. If software is VSS based,
any deltas to the file system that happen while the backup
software runs, go in there. At least, that's my suspicion of
where they go. If you were to succeed in completely removing
SVI, then you may have to run the backup software in non-VSS
mode. Not all software supports that. Non C: partitions
can be relatively "quiet", so there may not actually be
that many deltas on a data drive, while the backup runs.
Unless you were silly enough to have a program writing
out files, while the backup was running or something.

It's weird that I could remove SVI on all the other drives, byut not
this one. I really dont want to use any of it. When I delete stuff, I
want it GONE. Not to mention wasted disk space and the fact I have to
keep overlooking those damn files on everything when I look at my file
lists. I wouldn't mind getting rid of the Recycle bin files either. I
have that set to delete everything immediately. Like I said before, it
seems that XP likes to collect junk. Now I understand why it begins to
run slow after time, and why the HDD fills up for no reason. On top of
that, there are security issues. In my case there is really nothing
much that could be used against me stored on my computer, but lets say I
assist a a computerless friend to pay for something online. This
happened recently when I helped a friend sign up for a cellphone. On
the phone, he gave me his social security number, birthdate, and credit
card numbers. I typed them into a text file. I placed the order for
him, and deleted that file. When I deleted that file, I DO NOT want
traces of it still on my computer. Or another example, kets say I take
some photos and happen to capture a photo of someone doing something
illegal. Maybe a minor drinking a beer for example. Knowing this could
be used to harm someone, I decide to just delete that photo. That means
I want it GONE. (I know, that's kind of a stupid example). You get my
drift!!!

In the end, I dont want JUNK stored on my computer. I just want my
registry backed up and nothing more. I back up my OS. Progam files, and
personal stuff on backup drives. I dont want deleted junk stored.
There is a reason I delete it, which means I want it ENTIELY DELETED.


who emailed me their credit card number.
 
P

Paul

I just removed the partition on a 640G external HDD, which was NTFS.
This is intended to be a backup drive, so I want it to be Fat32 so I can
access it from any OS, including Win98 and Dos.

I decided that a 640G partition is too big, if for no other reason, I
tend to update the backup, and a huge drive like that can get real
fragmented. I wanted to just split it on half (TWO 320G). But when I
select Fat32, I can only format a partition of 196.6G. Apparently that
must be the limit for Fat32. Is this right, or am I missing something
or doing something wrong?

Note: Windows XP Computer management / Disk Management would not even
give me the option to use Fat32, so I'm now using Partition Magic.

Using this size partition, I'm forced to put 4 partitions on this drive.
Three are 196.6 and the last one is about 20G.

Thanks

FAT32 goes to 2.2TB.

Using Disk Management, make an NTFS partition. Assign it
the drive letter of your choice.

Then use the Ridgecrop Formatter, and it will
make FAT32 for you.

http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm?fat32format.htm

http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/download/fat32format.zip

fat32format f:

And that tool is how I get FAT32 partitions larger than
32GB or whatever the Microsoft "limit" is. Microsoft limits
the size, because of their notion of the practicality.

The SVI folder potentially serves more than one purpose.
It holds System Restore info. But it might also be
used by VSS during backup runs. If software is VSS based,
any deltas to the file system that happen while the backup
software runs, go in there. At least, that's my suspicion of
where they go. If you were to succeed in completely removing
SVI, then you may have to run the backup software in non-VSS
mode. Not all software supports that. Non C: partitions
can be relatively "quiet", so there may not actually be
that many deltas on a data drive, while the backup runs.
Unless you were silly enough to have a program writing
out files, while the backup was running or something.

If you still get complaints, you can create your NTFS partition
and use PTEDIT to change the partition type field. On a later
OS, you use Run as Administrator on the executable, to avoid
an "error 5". This tool is for MBR (not GPT) partitioned
disks. Double clicking a partition type field, should give a
small table of options. When you edit a field it turns red.

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip

You can also use things like GParted from Linux, if your
distro has that on board. It's like Disk Management in
a way. Use "sudo gparted".

Paul
 
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H

Hot-Text

|I just removed the partition on a 640G external HDD, which was NTFS.
| This is intended to be a backup drive, so I want it to be Fat32 so I can
| access it from any OS, including Win98 and Dos.
| I decided that a 640G partition is too big, if for no other reason, I
| tend to update the backup, and a huge drive like that can get real
| fragmented. I wanted to just split it on half (TWO 320G). But when I
| select Fat32, I can only format a partition of 196.6G. Apparently that
| must be the limit for Fat32. Is this right, or am I missing something
| or doing something wrong?
| Note: Windows XP Computer management / Disk Management would not even
| give me the option to use Fat32, so I'm now using Partition Magic.
| Using this size partition, I'm forced to put 4 partitions on this drive.
| Three are 196.6 and the last one is about 20G.
| Thanks

I running Windows 98se on
A 152628 MB MAXTOR
and it's more then it need

Be you be able to test
Start with 200 GB
if it Pass keep it

That's is a 150 GB
We knows it work's

But for win98
For a back up it have to be
on the First partition

Because DOS see no
partitions 32 after
a NTFS partition on Drive

DOS see
C: HardDrive1 First partition1
D: HardDrive2 First partition1
E: HardDrive3 First partition1

For windows 98
see partitions Drive
After been Booted
 
H

Hot-Text

"Paul"
|
| FAT32 goes to 2.2TB.
|
| Using Disk Management,
| Make an NTFS partition. Assign it
| the drive letter of your choice.

You have to make it D:
for DOS
if it a BackUP
For windows 98se

But you right for
Letter of your choice
Only
If you going to install
To a partition
 
B

Bob Willard

It's weird that I could remove SVI on all the other drives, byut not
this one. I really dont want to use any of it. When I delete stuff, I
want it GONE. Not to mention wasted disk space and the fact I have to
keep overlooking those damn files on everything when I look at my file
lists. I wouldn't mind getting rid of the Recycle bin files either. I
have that set to delete everything immediately. Like I said before, it
seems that XP likes to collect junk. Now I understand why it begins to
run slow after time, and why the HDD fills up for no reason. On top of
that, there are security issues. In my case there is really nothing
much that could be used against me stored on my computer, but lets say I
assist a a computerless friend to pay for something online. This
happened recently when I helped a friend sign up for a cellphone. On
the phone, he gave me his social security number, birthdate, and credit
card numbers. I typed them into a text file. I placed the order for
him, and deleted that file. When I deleted that file, I DO NOT want
traces of it still on my computer. Or another example, kets say I take
some photos and happen to capture a photo of someone doing something
illegal. Maybe a minor drinking a beer for example. Knowing this could
be used to harm someone, I decide to just delete that photo. That means
I want it GONE. (I know, that's kind of a stupid example). You get my
drift!!!

I hope you realize that delete, in the M$ sense of the verb, does not
delete the file; it merely hacks the filesystem pointer to the file,
leaving the file data intact. It is somewhat difficult to find the file
after "deletion", but not (in most cases) impossible. There are
undelete apps that allow amateurs to restore deleted files, and forensic
apps that allow pros to restore files that have been fully deleted.

If you really want to get rid of files, use one of the Eraser apps,
such as Eraser.exe. {I'm an Eraser user, but I have no financial
interest in it.}
 
C

casey.o

I hope you realize that delete, in the M$ sense of the verb, does not
delete the file; it merely hacks the filesystem pointer to the file,
leaving the file data intact. It is somewhat difficult to find the file
after "deletion", but not (in most cases) impossible. There are
undelete apps that allow amateurs to restore deleted files, and forensic
apps that allow pros to restore files that have been fully deleted.

If you really want to get rid of files, use one of the Eraser apps,
such as Eraser.exe. {I'm an Eraser user, but I have no financial
interest in it.}

Yes, I am aware of that. Partition Magic 8 has an option to write zeros
to every bite or sector, or whatever it is. It's supposed to bve real
slow. I've never tried it, since I really dont have anything needing
it.

I have an old Win98 utility that will UNDELETE any file, but only if
it's not been written over. I've used that several times over the years
when I actidentally deleted something. However, running Defrag, wipes
every possibility of using that program. I've never tried that Undelete
utility on Win2K or XP. I'd guess it might work on a Fat32 format, but I
doubt it on NTFS. I'll have to try....
 
M

Mayayana

|
| Where do you get BOOTIT?
|
http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm

Very fast. Very small. $35. $70 for a version licensed
for pro tech support. Free updates. (I had to buy the new
major version that supports Win7/8 booting, SATA, etc.
But there's no charge for updates within a major version.)
No spyware. No restrictions. Installs on and boots from a
floppy or CD. Does everything I need: Disk operations,
disk imaging, boot manager, on-disk file editor for doing
things like adjusting a wrong boot.ini config "on the fly".

It's Drive Image and Partition Magic in one. (Which is what
DI/PM would have been in the first place if Powerquest weren't
so exploitive.) What BootIt doesn't
do is backup. There seem to be two camps with this stuff.
BootIt is in the no-nonsense camp: It works well but doesn't
really hold your hand. It's a low-level tool. (Though it's fully
GUI.) The other camp seems to be the people who use Acronis.
They don't really distinguish between disk management and
backup, and they want a tool that will take care of it all for
them.
 
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K

Ken Springer

No ther systems can read it, including Mac,
Linux, etc

Not true for Mac, casey. OS X 10.5 Leopard through 10.8 Mountain Lion,
and possibly earlier I don't know, can read NTFS natively. But OS X
cannot format and write to it. There are utilities for OS X, one of
which I have installed, that will let you write and format NTFS disks.

I don't know if 10.9 will write and format NTFS as I've not updated my OS.


--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 25.0
Thunderbird 24.3.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
 
P

Paul

Thats right about Partition Magic and Symantec.
But it really should work for the OSs I'm using. I was released during
the XP era, and when people still used Win98 and 2000. There is NO
upgrade, version 8 pf PM was the last,

Disk management is a piece of shit. It almost forces you to use NTFS.
Typical of MS to force people to use their crap. NTFS is only used on
Microsoft's NT based OSs. No ther systems can read it, including Mac,
Linux, etc. Fat32 is much more universal.

Where do you get BOOTIT?

Thanks

Linux has been able to read and write NTFS, since
around March 2008. My Knoppix 5.3.1 DVD was the
first one I used, that would automatically mount
NTFS partitions for me. I think that might have
been a kernel driver. Before the kernel driver
was done, a user-space FUSE version was available,
but that probably required a bit more work on the
part of the user.

For the most part, Linux ignores NTFS permissions,
so you can get into a lot more folders than in
Windows. And that could be both a plus and a minus,
depending on how much damage you do :)

If you run Linux on the NTFS partition, I think
it invalidates the journal. If the partition is
"sick", make sure the partition is "CHKDSK clean"
before passing it to Linux.

Paul
 
H

Hot-Text

| On Wed, 04 Jun 2014 08:40:00 -0400, Bob Willard
|
| >On 6/3/2014 10:56 PM, (e-mail address removed) wrote:
| >>
| >> It's weird that I could remove SVI on all the other drives, byut not
| >> this one. I really dont want to use any of it. When I delete stuff, I
| >> want it GONE. Not to mention wasted disk space and the fact I have to
| >> keep overlooking those damn files on everything when I look at my file
| >> lists. I wouldn't mind getting rid of the Recycle bin files either. I
| >> have that set to delete everything immediately. Like I said before, it
| >> seems that XP likes to collect junk. Now I understand why it begins to
| >> run slow after time, and why the HDD fills up for no reason. On top of
| >> that, there are security issues. In my case there is really nothing
| >> much that could be used against me stored on my computer, but lets say
I
| >> assist a a computerless friend to pay for something online. This
| >> happened recently when I helped a friend sign up for a cellphone. On
| >> the phone, he gave me his social security number, birthdate, and credit
| >> card numbers. I typed them into a text file. I placed the order for
| >> him, and deleted that file. When I deleted that file, I DO NOT want
| >> traces of it still on my computer. Or another example, kets say I take
| >> some photos and happen to capture a photo of someone doing something
| >> illegal. Maybe a minor drinking a beer for example. Knowing this
could
| >> be used to harm someone, I decide to just delete that photo. That
means
| >> I want it GONE. (I know, that's kind of a stupid example). You get my
| >> drift!!!
| >>
| >
| >I hope you realize that delete, in the M$ sense of the verb, does not
| >delete the file; it merely hacks the filesystem pointer to the file,
| >leaving the file data intact. It is somewhat difficult to find the file
| >after "deletion", but not (in most cases) impossible. There are
| >undelete apps that allow amateurs to restore deleted files, and forensic
| >apps that allow pros to restore files that have been fully deleted.
| >
| >If you really want to get rid of files, use one of the Eraser apps,
| >such as Eraser.exe. {I'm an Eraser user, but I have no financial
| >interest in it.}
|
| Yes, I am aware of that. Partition Magic 8 has an option to write zeros
| to every bite or sector, or whatever it is. It's supposed to bve real
| slow. I've never tried it, since I really dont have anything needing
| it.
|
| I have an old Win98 utility that will UNDELETE any file, but only if
| it's not been written over. I've used that several times over the years
| when I actidentally deleted something. However, running Defrag, wipes
| every possibility of using that program. I've never tried that Undelete
| utility on Win2K or XP. I'd guess it might work on a Fat32 format, but I
| doubt it on NTFS. I'll have to try....


Defrag
Move
Data
In to the
Empty Data
Free Space

Were all
Data was Empty

Defrag
Eraser, Wipe-Out
And Paste Into
New Empty
Data Space
Move in
The New Data

But Do Not Empty
Your DELETE Files
In the Recycle Bin

Before a Defrag
So that you can
Use your UNDELETE Utility
to get the Recycle back

That was you unable to

UNDELETE
Who Cando
The Federal
Dovernment Can

All Data
Two
To or
Some Time
Four Defrag
Recycle
Layers Down

Good Old
Uncode Sam
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>,

(I know nearly nothing about SVI.)

If you shift-delete, rather than just delete, things don't go into the
recycle bin, but are fully "deleted". There's also a system setting
somewhere that makes ordinary deletes not use the ressicle bin. (And
some software - at least, IrfanView; I presume there are others - will
let you set _their_ internal delete to truly "delete".)

Well in the case of the recycle bin, you can set a maximum for it (I
can't remember whether as a percentage or in bytes - I think whichever
it is it tells you the other anyway). If you try to delete a file bigger
than that, the system tells you it won't be kept; if you delete smaller
ones, it uses some method (could be as simple as FIFO) to decide which
to dump if it needs to.
Yes, I am aware of that. Partition Magic 8 has an option to write zeros
to every bite or sector, or whatever it is. It's supposed to bve real
slow. I've never tried it, since I really dont have anything needing
it.

It can't be anything other than slow, if you think about it. But that's
a bit of a sledgehammer: when Bob referred to "one of the Eraser apps",
he meant ones that just erase where a given file was, rather than the
whole partition or whatever.
I have an old Win98 utility that will UNDELETE any file, but only if
it's not been written over. I've used that several times over the years
when I actidentally deleted something. However, running Defrag, wipes
every possibility of using that program. I've never tried that Undelete
utility on Win2K or XP. I'd guess it might work on a Fat32 format, but I
doubt it on NTFS. I'll have to try....

I don't _think_ it will. But there are NTFS ones: I have one called
Wundelete, or "Roadkils Undelete Version 1.2 (c) 2004-2006", apparently
from www.roadkil.net (I rarely use it, so see no need to update it; it
does what I need. There may well be better ones).
 

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