[OL 2013] Any automatic attachments compression add-on ?


D

dadep

Hello,
I'm starting using Outlook 2013 and no one of old add-ons I've used on
previous OL version is working with OL2013 (bxautozip, autozip).
Does anyone know if there are any tool available and working with OL2013
? (please, no winzip with its companion tool. I don't want to install
tons of MB and unnecessary services only to have a small feature !)
Thanks in advance
Best regards
Davide
 
Ad

Advertisements

V

VanguardLH

dadep said:
Hello,
I'm starting using Outlook 2013 and no one of old add-ons I've used on
previous OL version is working with OL2013 (bxautozip, autozip).
Does anyone know if there are any tool available and working with OL2013
? (please, no winzip with its companion tool. I don't want to install
tons of MB and unnecessary services only to have a small feature !)
Thanks in advance
Best regards
Davide
Did you install the 32- or 64-bit version of OL2013? If the 64-bit
version then you need to get 64-bit versions of the add-ons.
 
D

dadep

Il 15/12/2014 18:42, VanguardLH ha scritto:
Did you install the 32- or 64-bit version of OL2013? If the 64-bit
version then you need to get 64-bit versions of the add-ons.
I have 32bit version.
 
V

VanguardLH

dadep said:
Il 15/12/2014 18:42, VanguardLH ha scritto:
I have 32bit version.
BXautozip:

The last version was released back in Jul 2010. That was before
OL2013 got released in Jan 2013. OL2010 was released in Jul 2010 so
this product may not even support OL2010 or compatibility with OL2010
was a happy coincidence. The last product they released was Folder
Shield back in Jan 2012.

When I try to visit http://www.baxbex.com/, I get "you don't have
permission on this server" and "403 forbidden error". They went belly
up (web site is dead but still allows connects) or their server or
hosted web site (www.baxbex.com = 195.20.254.143 = ordner-passwort.de)
is screwed up (get "requested page can not be displayed). So I could
not tell what BaxBex claimed for OS support of this product. I was
able to connect to http://www.baxbex.de/. From a Google translated
version of their web site, they list the following Outlook versions as
supported by this product: 97, 98, 2000, XP (aka 2002), 2003, 2007,
and 2010. 2013 is not listed as supported.

You didn't mention under which version of Windows that you installed
this product. The handler (the program that does the actual work)
runs outside of Outlook so that handler must run under a supported OS.
Their Dutch page lists Windows 95/98, ME, NT, 2000, XP, Vista, and 7
as supported but recall from above which versions of Outlook that they
support. You never mentioned just what version was the "prior
version" of Outlook. Maybe you were back on Outlook 2003 and running
it under Windows XP.

AutoZip:

Not a very unique product title. So I had to guess which one you
meant. Was it Cool Soft (http://coolsoft.altervista.org/en/AutoZIP)?
That does not run as an add-on to Outlook so it is not relevant to
discussion here. That is run outside of Outlook like any other well-
known compressed archive utility. You could use PeaZip, 7-zip or some
other free zip tool if you don't want to install and use (and pay for)
WinZip.

Is there a reason that OL2013's resize feature is not doable for you?
Attach a file to an e-mail that you are composing (Insert tab -> Include
group -> Attach file) and then resize it (File tab -> Image Attachments
-> Resize large images). You didn't specify what TYPE of file you were
attaching to your e-mails. Many files are already in a compressed
format so no add-on or zip tool is going to compress it further. In
fact, you end up adding another header for the new zip wrapper to
contents that were incompressible and instead make the compressed
archive larger.

The resize feature will be missing on a reply to an e-mail containing an
attachment. That's because the reply, by default, will not include the
attachment. After all, the person who sent you their original e-mail
already has that file either in their copy of the message they sent to
you or the file they attached to it.
 
D

dadep

Il 15/12/2014 19:37, VanguardLH ha scritto:
BXautozip:

The last version was released back in Jul 2010.
.............................
When I try to visit http://www.baxbex.com/, I get "you don't have
permission on this server" and "403 forbidden error".
..........................
Yes, I know that it is no more developed, and th website is down. I have
tried to use it with OL2013, with no luck.
You didn't mention under which version of Windows that you installed
this product.
Windows 7 Pro 64bit
AutoZip:

Not a very unique product title.
http://www.saurabhkumar.com/autozip/


Is there a reason that OL2013's resize feature is not doable for you?
I didn't know this feature.

You didn't specify what TYPE of file you were
attaching to your e-mails.
My attachments normally are word, pdf or txt documents, not images.

thank you
 
V

VanguardLH

dadep said:
VanguardLH ha scritto:


My attachments normally are word, pdf or txt documents, not images.
Remember that compressing a huge file will still leave a large
compressed archive file. ALL e-mail gets sent as text. HTML is text.
Attachments are converted to a long encoded text string which bloats its
size by 133%, or more. Recipients may not be able to receive those
large e-mails (per-message quota limit, inbox full due to disk quota).

You might want to use a Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com account with which
OL2013 will intregate to send large attachments (the attachment gets
uploaded to your Hotmail account and a link put into your e-mail).
There are many online file storage services where you can upload a file
to then put a hyperlink to it in your e-mail. Rather than choking down
a huge e-mail to the recipient, send them a small e-mail with a link and
let them decide if and when to retrieve the big file. Personally I find
it rude for someone to send me a huge e-mail with one, or more, large
attachments despite that I'm on broadband. There is no resume with
e-mail, there is no hash check to ensure reliable transfer, e-mail is
not a guaranteed delivery system, transfer is slow despite whatever
speed the recipient has because e-mail servers choke bandwidth to ensure
ALL their users have some response, and e-mail was never designed as a
file transfer protocol.

Many compression archive tools add a context menu entry to Windows
Explorer. You can right-click on the .pdf or .doc file and elect to
compress and also send by e-mail in one click. Peazip has its "Zip and
E-mail" context menu entry. I'm sure the others do, too. My Peazip's
folder consumes under 30MB of disk space. Since I use it outside of
e-mail, it doesn't occupy any more space to use if for e-mail. I cannot
recall anyone that wanted to compress their e-mail attachments who did
not also use compression archive tools outside of e-mail.
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

dadep

Il 16/12/2014 21:36, VanguardLH ha scritto:
Remember that compressing a huge file will still leave a large
compressed archive file. ALL e-mail gets sent as text. HTML is text.
Attachments are converted to a long encoded text string which bloats its
size by 133%, or more. Recipients may not be able to receive those
large e-mails (per-message quota limit, inbox full due to disk quota).

You might want to use a Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com account with which
OL2013 will intregate to send large attachments (the attachment gets
uploaded to your Hotmail account and a link put into your e-mail).
There are many online file storage services where you can upload a file
to then put a hyperlink to it in your e-mail. Rather than choking down
a huge e-mail to the recipient, send them a small e-mail with a link and
let them decide if and when to retrieve the big file. Personally I find
it rude for someone to send me a huge e-mail with one, or more, large
attachments despite that I'm on broadband. There is no resume with
e-mail, there is no hash check to ensure reliable transfer, e-mail is
not a guaranteed delivery system, transfer is slow despite whatever
speed the recipient has because e-mail servers choke bandwidth to ensure
ALL their users have some response, and e-mail was never designed as a
file transfer protocol.

Many compression archive tools add a context menu entry to Windows
Explorer. You can right-click on the .pdf or .doc file and elect to
compress and also send by e-mail in one click. Peazip has its "Zip and
E-mail" context menu entry. I'm sure the others do, too. My Peazip's
folder consumes under 30MB of disk space. Since I use it outside of
e-mail, it doesn't occupy any more space to use if for e-mail. I cannot
recall anyone that wanted to compress their e-mail attachments who did
not also use compression archive tools outside of e-mail.
Hi,
I agree with everything you wrote.
Since I use box.com as cloud storage, there is a plugin that upload
attachments to box and insert the link to the file in the mail body.
I'll try to see if it works well.

Thank you
Davide
 
Ad

Advertisements

V

VanguardLH

dadep said:
Since I use box.com as cloud storage, there is a plugin that upload
attachments to box and insert the link to the file in the mail body.
I'll try to see if it works well.
I remember trialing box.com with Thunderbird's Filelink feature but
didn't know of an add-on for Outlook, too. Just looked on their site
and found https://app.box.com/services/browse/search/box_for_office.

I quit using them because their automatic update (over which you have no
control) will modify the Start menu to add their folder to it. My Start
menu is organized into hiearchies, like Applications, Security, Online,
Maintenance, Utilities, etc. Them shoving in a new folder in my Start
folder means I have to sometime later notice (since they don't announce
an update) their modification of my Start menu to delete that
superfluous folder. This is rude behavior. I complained to them about
it but after 7 months they were still rude so I quit using them.

With box.com, you get 10GB in a free account. That's big but my
Skydrive (now OneDrive) has a 25GB quota, plus OneDrive support is built
into OL2013. I have the OneDrive local client to make my online file
storage for OneDrive appear as a local folder but I believe OL2013 can
connect directly to a OneDrive account to store big attachments there.

Just remember when copying files to online storage that the only
protection there is your login credentials. Use a strong password.
Since accounts can and have been hacked, any documents you store there
with sensitive information should probably be encrypted.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top