O/T Memory question


O

oO

Hi,

I have 512mb in my PC and think it is time to upgrade with a bit more
(probably add a gig). I want to make sure I'm getting the right type.

Current memory has a label which says:

MT16VDDT 6464AG - 335CA
CCTA4494007 200343

512mb, DDR, 333 CL2.5

Each module is marked
46v 32mb

I'm guessing the important part is the 512mb DDR. Am I right in saying that
any new memory must be the same speed. From the above I guess my current
memory is 333mhz.

Based on this I should be looking for 333mhz DDR ram.

Can anyone confirm that this is right? And is there anything else I need to
consider? What does CL2.5 mean? Is that relevant?

I'm thinking this might do
http://www.savastore.com/productinfo/product.aspx?catalog_name=Savastore&product_id=10291594&pid=45&tid=279
 
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G

Gizmo

oO said:
Hi,

I have 512mb in my PC and think it is time to upgrade with a bit more
(probably add a gig). I want to make sure I'm getting the right type.

Current memory has a label which says:

MT16VDDT 6464AG - 335CA
CCTA4494007 200343

512mb, DDR, 333 CL2.5

Each module is marked
46v 32mb

I'm guessing the important part is the 512mb DDR. Am I right in saying
that any new memory must be the same speed. From the above I guess my
current memory is 333mhz.

Based on this I should be looking for 333mhz DDR ram.

Can anyone confirm that this is right? And is there anything else I need
to consider? What does CL2.5 mean? Is that relevant?
http://www.crucial.com/uk/

Use the Memory Advisory Tool on the home page
 
M

Mike T.

oO said:
Hi,

I have 512mb in my PC and think it is time to upgrade with a bit more
(probably add a gig). I want to make sure I'm getting the right type.

Current memory has a label which says:

MT16VDDT 6464AG - 335CA
CCTA4494007 200343

512mb, DDR, 333 CL2.5

Each module is marked
46v 32mb

I'm guessing the important part is the 512mb DDR. Am I right in saying
that any new memory must be the same speed. From the above I guess my
current memory is 333mhz.

Based on this I should be looking for 333mhz DDR ram.

Can anyone confirm that this is right? And is there anything else I need
to consider? What does CL2.5 mean? Is that relevant?

I'm thinking this might do
http://www.savastore.com/productinfo/product.aspx?catalog_name=Savastore&product_id=10291594&pid=45&tid=279
Nope, not even close.

Most RAM is non-ecc. If your RAM was ECC, it would be prominently marked as
such. Also, your current RAM is actually 166MHz. (DDR333) 333MHz would be
something like DDR666. I'm not sure that puppy exists, but I wouldn't touch
it if it did. :)

CL is CAS Latency, lower numbers are better (faster) there.

You should be looking at something like the following, if you can find it
from a UK vendor:

http://www.mwave.com/mwave/skusearch.hmx?SCriteria=BA21255&CartID=done&nextloc=
 
O

oO

Mike T. said:
Nope, not even close.

Most RAM is non-ecc. If your RAM was ECC, it would be prominently marked
as such. Also, your current RAM is actually 166MHz. (DDR333) 333MHz
would be something like DDR666. I'm not sure that puppy exists, but I
wouldn't touch it if it did. :)

CL is CAS Latency, lower numbers are better (faster) there.

You should be looking at something like the following, if you can find it
from a UK vendor:

http://www.mwave.com/mwave/skusearch.hmx?SCriteria=BA21255&CartID=done&nextloc=
Hey thanks for the info. I really don't have a clue. What confuses me
further though is this:

The memory at the link above states: DDR333 SDRAM then says under tech
specs: 333mhz.
 
C

Colin Wilson

I have 512mb in my PC and think it is time to upgrade with a bit more
(probably add a gig). I want to make sure I'm getting the right type.
I'm guessing the important part is the 512mb DDR. Am I right in saying that
any new memory must be the same speed. From the above I guess my current
memory is 333mhz.
Based on this I should be looking for 333mhz DDR ram.
Can anyone confirm that this is right? And is there anything else I need to
consider? What does CL2.5 mean? Is that relevant?
The CAS latency refers to a "lag" time before it responds, so a lower CL
will usually correspond to faster memory.

Per the other post, use the Crucial memory advisor, but beware that
unmatched memory can sometimes cause problems - it might be worth
burning off a memtest86 CD so you can do a couple of hours "soak test"
when you put the new stuff in - it might help identify any issues prior
to using Windows, as it can be hard to differentiate between memory and
windows problems at times :-}
 
O

oO

Gizmo said:
http://www.crucial.com/uk/

Use the Memory Advisory Tool on the home page
Thanks I would use this. However I have problems identifying my machine's
model and motherboard. The machine was constructed by Time (Platina model).
The code on the back is 30029MY07G4. Which I presume is the model - but that
is not listed. The motherboard is stamped MS-6775.Can't see any other
idenfication markings.
 
O

oO

oO said:
Thanks I would use this. However I have problems identifying my machine's
model and motherboard. The machine was constructed by Time (Platina
model). The code on the back is 30029MY07G4. Which I presume is the
model - but that is not listed. The motherboard is stamped MS-6775.Can't
see any other idenfication markings.
OK. Latest update. Noticed that Crucial has a system scanner. Ran that. It
recommends: 184-pin DIMM DDR PC2700
1GB-CT12864Z335 DDR PC2700 CL=2.5 NON-ECC

Will give that a shot. Thanks for all the help.
 
J

Jon Danniken

oO said:
:> >

Thanks I would use this. However I have problems identifying my machine's
model and motherboard. The machine was constructed by Time (Platina model).
The code on the back is 30029MY07G4. Which I presume is the model - but that
is not listed. The motherboard is stamped MS-6775.Can't see any other
idenfication markings.
Here is a discussion about that board, including a link to a pdf file
purported to be the manual:
http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?topic=59333

Jon
 
M

Mike Walsh

oO wrote:

DDR333 memory runs at 333 Mhz. The clock frequency is actually 166 Mhz but the memory can read and write at twice the clock speed (Double Data Rate).
 
K

kony

Hey thanks for the info. I really don't have a clue. What confuses me
further though is this:

The memory at the link above states: DDR333 SDRAM then says under tech
specs: 333mhz.

That's because a few people in the industry still keep
incorrectly calling the DDR rate the frequency.

What you're looking for is commonly called PC2700. PC3200
is usually backwards compatible and the odds of it working
are also very high. Since your present module is CAS 2.5,
get another 2.5.
 
O

oO

That's because a few people in the industry still keep
incorrectly calling the DDR rate the frequency.

What you're looking for is commonly called PC2700. PC3200
is usually backwards compatible and the odds of it working
are also very high. Since your present module is CAS 2.5,
get another 2.5.
Thanks very much. And thanks to everyone who responded.
 
G

Gavin

Hi,

I have 512mb in my PC and think it is time to upgrade with a bit more
(probably add a gig). I want to make sure I'm getting the right type.

Current memory has a label which says:

MT16VDDT 6464AG - 335CA
CCTA4494007 200343

512mb, DDR, 333 CL2.5

Each module is marked
46v 32mb

How many stick of memory do you have and how many free slots are on
the motherboard?

Cheaper brands tend to fill all the slots up with smaller size sticks
than just one stick,

If you have free slots just add them in, if you have no free slots
you'll have to take something away to put more in, so if you have 2
slots and you currently have 512 then you have to buy a 1gb stick.
Mismatching ram sizes can give you all sorts of wierd issues so you
might be better just buying another 512mb or 2 x 1gb sticks.

Unbranded memory can be just as goos as branded but if there not much
in it go for crucial or Kinston

Finally unless your doing something heavy like video editing or
working on huge images 1gb will suffice for XP in most cases.
 
O

oO

Gavin said:
How many stick of memory do you have and how many free slots are on
the motherboard?

Cheaper brands tend to fill all the slots up with smaller size sticks
than just one stick,

If you have free slots just add them in, if you have no free slots
you'll have to take something away to put more in, so if you have 2
slots and you currently have 512 then you have to buy a 1gb stick.
One slot taken with the 512mb. Two slots free/empty.
Mismatching ram sizes can give you all sorts of wierd issues so you
might be better just buying another 512mb or 2 x 1gb sticks.
Didn't know this. I have 512mb and have ordered another gig. Hopefully it
won't throw up any problems.
Unbranded memory can be just as goos as branded but if there not much
in it go for crucial or Kinston

Finally unless your doing something heavy like video editing or
working on huge images 1gb will suffice for XP in most cases.
Thanks.
 
D

Dave

Hey thanks for the info. I really don't have a clue. What confuses me
further though is this:

The memory at the link above states: DDR333 SDRAM then says under tech
specs: 333mhz.
That's wrong. The clock frequency is 166MHz. It is dual data rate, though.
So it supposedly has an effective clock rate of 333MHz, as it is running
about twice as fast as the actual clock rate. To call it 333MHz though is
just plain wrong. DDR333 is correct, as that does not imply clock rate.
PC2700 is also correct. 333MHz will never be a correct way to describe
DDR333 memory though. -Dave
 
L

Lin Chung

Colin said:
...beware that unmatched memory can sometimes cause problems - it
might be worth burning off a memtest86 CD so you can do a couple
of hours "soak test" when you put the new stuff in ....

To simplify matter, testing the workings of the memory sticks doesn't
require the full blown Memtest86 (overnight protracted agony!); a test
inside the PC Pitstop's full PC tune-up test (takes only minutes) will
suffice. When there is problem or suspected problem with the memory,
however, Memtest86 is invaluable.

Memtest86
http://www.memtest86.com/
PC Pitstop
http://www.pcpitstop.com/
 
K

kony

To simplify matter, testing the workings of the memory sticks doesn't
require the full blown Memtest86 (overnight protracted agony!); a test
inside the PC Pitstop's full PC tune-up test (takes only minutes) will
suffice. When there is problem or suspected problem with the memory,
however, Memtest86 is invaluable.

There is no few-minutes test that is adequate to test
memory, an error rate of once a day is enough to cripple a
system.

If it is such agony to test overnight, why not just sleep
then it won't have mattered if it ran a few hours?
 
S

Sauron

The memory will need to be the same bus speed or else it will run at the
slowest speed and also applies to the latency of the ram (CAS) and the
latter tends to be 3.0 on 1GB+ sticks unless you go for the top end stuff
but you will often find value ram from the big venders can handle a CAS of
2.5 when branded at 3.0, you will also need to know if your board supports
duel channel.
 
C

Colin Wilson

To simplify matter, testing the workings of the memory sticks doesn't
require the full blown Memtest86 (overnight protracted agony!)
I find that 5-10 mins is usually enough to tell you if there are going
to be "issues" - really buggered memory will show itself quite quickly.

The one exception I saw to this was, I think, on my current Dell machine
- I was seeing errors, yet the machine runs flawlessly - possibly
because the gfx memory is shared from the main RAM pool, and memtest
didn't know / detect it as such ?!?
 
P

Paul

Hey thanks for the info. I really don't have a clue. What confuses me
further though is this:

The memory at the link above states: DDR333 SDRAM then says under tech
specs: 333mhz.
That's wrong. The clock frequency is 166MHz. It is dual data rate, though.
So it supposedly has an effective clock rate of 333MHz, as it is running
about twice as fast as the actual clock rate. To call it 333MHz though is
just plain wrong. DDR333 is correct, as that does not imply clock rate.
PC2700 is also correct. 333MHz will never be a correct way to describe
DDR333 memory though. -Dave[/QUOTE]

______ ______ ______
Clock _____| |______| |_______|
______________
Command/Addr ___/ \___
\______________/
______ ______
Data (DDR) ___/ \/ \___
\______/\ _____/

There are two data transfers per clock on DDR memory. If the
clock is 166Mhz, the memory is DDR333.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR_SDRAM

Also, while memtest86+ is a good initial test for memory,
and can weed out really bad memory products, the best
final test is to run Prime95 (mersenne.org). It is
a much more sensitive test than memtest86+, but Prime95
does not test every byte of memory like memtest86+ does.
Thus, running both tests is a good thing to do. You
use memtest86+ right after the new memory is installed,
before attempting to boot Windows for the first time.
If memtest86+ passes for two complete passes error free,
then it is probably safe to boot Windows and do the
Prime95 test while in Windows. (One poster I tried to
help, had a massive corruption of his Windows install,
even after memtest86+ passed error free. So while the
above is the best we can do with free tools, it comes
with no guarantees. )

Paul
 
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K

kony

I find that 5-10 mins is usually enough to tell you if there are going
to be "issues" - really buggered memory will show itself quite quickly.

If you only test for 5-10 minutes, then how will you ever
know later what caused a problem? Many errors will not
cause a bluescreen or other type of crash. Granted, if the
use of the system is such that an undetected problem won't
matter so long as there's no crash (like "some" websurfing
and other low-risk activites or gaming), it might be ok.
Other times it can be more problematic, like making backups,
financial calculations, decompressing and installing
applications or even the OS itself.

Really bad instability will indeed reveal itself within one
pass of memtest86, but it's not at all uncommon to have to
run it for several hours just to catch a few errors.
 

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