NEW: Vista to XP Downgrades (fore everyone reguardless pf company who sold your pc) - Customers must

  • Thread starter non flammable on Vista
  • Start date

N

non flammable on Vista

If you have Vista Ultimate or Business you can now install XP instead,
before the company who you got the PC needed to give you the OK, now
everyone can do it (New process below.. read on)

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Windows-Vista-to-Windows-XP-Downgrades-Media-75757.shtml


Enlarge pictureWith the advent of Windows Vista, the issue of downgrading to
Windows XP came into the limelight and got a consistent amount of play
throughout 2007. Initially, Microsoft had a complex downgrading process in
place that forced Windows users to go from Vista to XP through unnecessary
activation pains. As a direct consequence of user feedback, the company
simplified the downgrading process, in order to streamline the
implementation of an older Windows iteration in place of Vista.

Here was the old process of downgrading from Vista to XP, courtesy of
Microsoft: "when an end user is using their downgrade rights offered under
the License Terms in Windows Vista Business and Windows Vista Ultimate
editions, and they use both Windows XP media and product keys that were
previously activated, they cannot activate online over the Internet, due to
the hardware configuration change when installing on the Windows Vista
system. In these cases, the end user is prompted to call the Activation
Support Line for assistance. Once it is determined that the end user has a
valid Windows Vista Business or Windows Vista Ultimate license, the support
representative can help them activate their software."

This is no longer the case at this point, and downgrade users do not have to
manually activate each copy of Windows. The move from Microsoft helped made
downgrades more mainstream, but at the same time generated a negative aura
around the entire process. However, due to the mixed reviews associated with
Vista, and because Microsoft is allowing select customers to go back to XP
from the latest release of the Windows client, downgrading became virtually
an antonym to upgrading. And this is not the case. Not even by far.

Customers and, especially, businesses have the option of acquiring new
computers, as a part of the process of upgrading their hardware
infrastructure, while also buying licenses for the latest Windows version
available on the market. This is not to say that their environment is ready
for a migration to Vista, and in this context, Microsoft is offering
business customers the alternative of running an older variant of Windows
until transition plans are complete.

"If your license of Windows has downgrade rights, then you can use: 'Volume
Licensing media (provided the end user has a Volume Licensing agreement),
retail (FPP), or system builder hologram CD (provided the software is
acquired in accordance with the Microsoft OEM System Builder License)'. So
any media for the qualifying downgrade version that the customer owns
through another license already can be used", revealed Eric Ligman,
Microsoft US Senior Manager, Small Business Community Engagement.

Where does the media come from? Well, Ligman offered the answer: "the
downgrade media must be supplied to you from the end user and must come from
Microsoft retail, OEM/system builder, or Volume Licensing channels." This
actually means that the customer will have to deliver the media for the
downgrade, in order for the OEM to take care of the process. The obvious
alternative is for the user to perform the downgrade and to take the OEM out
of the equation.
 
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T

The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly

non said:
If you have Vista Ultimate or Business you can now install XP instead,
before the company who you got the PC needed to give you the OK, now
everyone can do it (New process below.. read on)

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Windows-Vista-to-Windows-XP-Downgrades-Media-75757.shtml



Enlarge pictureWith the advent of Windows Vista, the issue of
downgrading to Windows XP came into the limelight and got a consistent
amount of play throughout 2007. Initially, Microsoft had a complex
downgrading process in place that forced Windows users to go from Vista
to XP through unnecessary activation pains. As a direct consequence of
user feedback, the company simplified the downgrading process, in order
to streamline the implementation of an older Windows iteration in place
of Vista.

Here was the old process of downgrading from Vista to XP, courtesy of
Microsoft: "when an end user is using their downgrade rights offered
under the License Terms in Windows Vista Business and Windows Vista
Ultimate editions, and they use both Windows XP media and product keys
that were previously activated, they cannot activate online over the
Internet, due to the hardware configuration change when installing on
the Windows Vista system. In these cases, the end user is prompted to
call the Activation Support Line for assistance. Once it is determined
that the end user has a valid Windows Vista Business or Windows Vista
Ultimate license, the support representative can help them activate
their software."

This is no longer the case at this point, and downgrade users do not
have to manually activate each copy of Windows. The move from Microsoft
helped made downgrades more mainstream, but at the same time generated a
negative aura around the entire process. However, due to the mixed
reviews associated with Vista, and because Microsoft is allowing select
customers to go back to XP from the latest release of the Windows
client, downgrading became virtually an antonym to upgrading. And this
is not the case. Not even by far.

Customers and, especially, businesses have the option of acquiring new
computers, as a part of the process of upgrading their hardware
infrastructure, while also buying licenses for the latest Windows
version available on the market. This is not to say that their
environment is ready for a migration to Vista, and in this context,
Microsoft is offering business customers the alternative of running an
older variant of Windows until transition plans are complete.

"If your license of Windows has downgrade rights, then you can use:
'Volume Licensing media (provided the end user has a Volume Licensing
agreement), retail (FPP), or system builder hologram CD (provided the
software is acquired in accordance with the Microsoft OEM System Builder
License)'. So any media for the qualifying downgrade version that the
customer owns through another license already can be used", revealed
Eric Ligman, Microsoft US Senior Manager, Small Business Community
Engagement.

Where does the media come from? Well, Ligman offered the answer: "the
downgrade media must be supplied to you from the end user and must come
from Microsoft retail, OEM/system builder, or Volume Licensing
channels." This actually means that the customer will have to deliver
the media for the downgrade, in order for the OEM to take care of the
process. The obvious alternative is for the user to perform the
downgrade and to take the OEM out of the equation.

Couldn't you order it here?
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326246/en-us

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