.Net Dlls and ASP.NET app.


G

Guest

I posted this question in the past, but have not
yet received an answer. Here is the question.

By default an ASP.NET app developed in Visual Studio
compiles it's code to a DLL located in the bin directory.
Is it worth while to try to break your code into seperate
DLLs, rather than allow your project to keep building this
DLL larger and larger as you develop your app? Does it
save memory to have less frequently used (by the user)
code in a seperate DLL.

If you broke the code into seperate DLLs and wanted to
continue to work within Visual Studio, would you need
seperate projects?

If you had seperate dependant projects would all the
Dlls wind up in the same bin directory, or in a seperate
bin for each project.

Thanks in advance - (e-mail address removed)
 
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D

David Browne

I posted this question in the past, but have not
yet received an answer. Here is the question.

By default an ASP.NET app developed in Visual Studio
compiles it's code to a DLL located in the bin directory.
Is it worth while to try to break your code into seperate
DLLs, rather than allow your project to keep building this
DLL larger and larger as you develop your app? Does it
save memory to have less frequently used (by the user)
code in a seperate DLL.

Yes, but trivial amounts.
If you broke the code into seperate DLLs and wanted to
continue to work within Visual Studio, would you need
seperate projects?

Yes. The other projects would be class libraries. They could all be in the
same solution.
If you had seperate dependant projects would all the
Dlls wind up in the same bin directory, or in a seperate
bin for each project.

Both. If a reference's CopyLocal property is true, it will be copied into
your bin directory when you build.

David
 
V

Vincent V

If you have dlls in seperate projects is it the same situation
with getting the Current context items?
 
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Y

Yan-Hong Huang[MSFT]

Hello,

David is right. You could also refer to http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/dnbda/html/tdlg_ch3.asp?frame=true for
Microsoft Practices on how to structure Solutions and Projects.

Hope it helps.

Best regards,
Yanhong Huang
Microsoft Online Partner Support

Get Secure! ¨C www.microsoft.com/security
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

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!Subject: .Net Dlls and ASP.NET app.
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!
!
! I posted this question in the past, but have not
!yet received an answer. Here is the question.
!
! By default an ASP.NET app developed in Visual Studio
!compiles it's code to a DLL located in the bin directory.
!Is it worth while to try to break your code into seperate
!DLLs, rather than allow your project to keep building this
!DLL larger and larger as you develop your app? Does it
!save memory to have less frequently used (by the user)
!code in a seperate DLL.
!
! If you broke the code into seperate DLLs and wanted to
!continue to work within Visual Studio, would you need
!seperate projects?
!
! If you had seperate dependant projects would all the
!Dlls wind up in the same bin directory, or in a seperate
!bin for each project.
!
! Thanks in advance - (e-mail address removed)
!
 

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