My computer restarts instead of shuts down...


J

John Doe

Not a big deal, but it is annoying.

Lately, when shutting down my computer, it restarts instead of
shuts down. The second time works okay. The only suspect I have is
the new SSD. My installation should be very clean, no root kits
detected. Of course there are workarounds like using the power
switch on the reboot.

Oh yeah, there's also the RAM drive that is used for temporary
files, Windows and Firefox. I don't recall if the onset of the
reboot problem started when that RAM drive was installed, but will
pay attention to that possibility.
 
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P

Paul

John said:
Not a big deal, but it is annoying.

Lately, when shutting down my computer, it restarts instead of
shuts down. The second time works okay. The only suspect I have is
the new SSD. My installation should be very clean, no root kits
detected. Of course there are workarounds like using the power
switch on the reboot.

Oh yeah, there's also the RAM drive that is used for temporary
files, Windows and Firefox. I don't recall if the onset of the
reboot problem started when that RAM drive was installed, but will
pay attention to that possibility.

If that "RAM drive" is the one I think it is, that runs in Ring0,
and it's the equivalent of a "driver". So yes, it would be
a candidate for un-installation, and retesting.

If a driver dies during shutdown, and you haven't changed
your Automatic reboot option on a BSOD, you can reboot without
seeing a BSOD. If you've set up Windows, so on a BSOD, the
blue screen just sits there, you'll be better able to analyse
the situation.

(Untick Automatically Restart, to be able to view BSODs properly...)

http://pcauthorities.com/images/xp-startup-recovery.jpg

When the BSOD happens, you might get a driver name, or other
usable details.

Paul
 
J

John Doe

Paul said:
John Doe wrote:

If that "RAM drive" is the one I think it is, that runs in
Ring0, and it's the equivalent of a "driver". So yes, it would
be a candidate for un-installation, and retesting.

If a driver dies during shutdown, and you haven't changed your
Automatic reboot option on a BSOD, you can reboot without seeing
a BSOD. If you've set up Windows, so on a BSOD, the blue screen
just sits there, you'll be better able to analyse the situation.

(Untick Automatically Restart, to be able to view BSODs
properly...)

http://pcauthorities.com/images/xp-startup-recovery.jpg

When the BSOD happens, you might get a driver name, or other
usable details.

Coincidentally, I have seen some blue screen stuff and there has
been some hanging on shutdown. You're probably spot on. Also
coincidentally, I'm using the RAM drive you recommended. Of course
I can try messing with its settings or the way I'm using it, and
so on.

First, I will try unchecking that box. I suspect that will help
troubleshoot at least part of the problem.

--
 
J

John Doe

After unchecking the Automatically Restart checkbox, Windows
produced an error that mentioned having no swap file. So I left
that box checked, and instead, I allowed Windows to manage the
swap file on both physical drives, the SSD and the HDD. Before,
the swap file was disabled on the Windows drive C, and the swap
file was a fixed size on the data drive D. Preliminary results
indicate proper shutdown.
 
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J

John Doe

And after a while... Seems that allowing Windows to manage the
swap file size on the two physical drives solves the problem. Not
sure whether it works when I specify a size.
 

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