Move IDE to SATA


L

Lil' Dave

I've been using the same motherboard now for 2 years. Have been using
onboard ide drive for booting XP.

Would like to use onboard SATA now. 2 SATA II drives on the way via UPS.

I have studied some on it. I know I have to jumper the Seagate 250GB SATAs
as the motherboard is SATA I. I know I have to manually configure the bios
to run actual SATA, not remap the SATAs as ide drives (or should I do this
instead?). The only actual remaining onboard ide device will be a DVD
burner as master on secondary. My final intentions for the 2 currently
onboard ide drives 80GB each is to use for backups for imaging in a
removable tray connected to primary ide. If the bios setup remap is needed
to ide for SATA, I can connect these to the second connection on the Promise
TX2 133 controller.

I have both DriveImage and TrueImage (seagate software) backups of the first
80GB drive on 2 other hard drives via removable tray. These attach via a
Promise TX2 133 controller card. The second 80GB is a clone, can be
disregarded regarding this.

Plan to use the second SATA drive as hidden onboard clone.

Questions:

1. If I remap the SATAs as ide, will I suffer any performance degradation?

2. Do I just restore the image of my 80GB boot drive to the SATA? Will it
boot normally if configured as SATA, not a remap to ide?

3. Will I have to a repair or clean install of XP?

4. Does HAL change if the boot drive is changed from ide to SATA?

I usually don't multi-newsgroup post, but this seemed the best way.
Dave
 
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Poprivet

Lil' Dave said:
I've been using the same motherboard now for 2 years. Have been using
onboard ide drive for booting XP.

Would like to use onboard SATA now. 2 SATA II drives on the way via
UPS.
I have studied some on it. I know I have to jumper the Seagate 250GB
SATAs as the motherboard is SATA I. I know I have to manually
configure the bios to run actual SATA, not remap the SATAs as ide
drives (or should I do this instead?). The only actual remaining
onboard ide device will be a DVD burner as master on secondary. My
final intentions for the 2 currently onboard ide drives 80GB each is
to use for backups for imaging in a removable tray connected to
primary ide. If the bios setup remap is needed to ide for SATA, I
can connect these to the second connection on the Promise TX2 133
controller.
I have both DriveImage and TrueImage (seagate software) backups of
the first 80GB drive on 2 other hard drives via removable tray. These
attach via a Promise TX2 133 controller card. The second 80GB
is a clone, can be disregarded regarding this.

Plan to use the second SATA drive as hidden onboard clone.

Questions:

1. If I remap the SATAs as ide, will I suffer any performance
degradation?
2. Do I just restore the image of my 80GB boot drive to the SATA? Will it
boot normally if configured as SATA, not a remap to ide?

3. Will I have to a repair or clean install of XP?

4. Does HAL change if the boot drive is changed from ide to SATA?

I usually don't multi-newsgroup post, but this seemed the best way.
Dave

Can't help with your question, but what you did is called CROSS-posting and
IS the correct way to post to multiple newgroups. It can sometimes be
useful an d is much better than multi-posting.
 
P

Paul

Lil' Dave said:
I've been using the same motherboard now for 2 years. Have been using
onboard ide drive for booting XP.

Would like to use onboard SATA now. 2 SATA II drives on the way via UPS.

I have studied some on it. I know I have to jumper the Seagate 250GB SATAs
as the motherboard is SATA I. I know I have to manually configure the bios
to run actual SATA, not remap the SATAs as ide drives (or should I do this
instead?). The only actual remaining onboard ide device will be a DVD
burner as master on secondary. My final intentions for the 2 currently
onboard ide drives 80GB each is to use for backups for imaging in a
removable tray connected to primary ide. If the bios setup remap is needed
to ide for SATA, I can connect these to the second connection on the Promise
TX2 133 controller.

I have both DriveImage and TrueImage (seagate software) backups of the first
80GB drive on 2 other hard drives via removable tray. These attach via a
Promise TX2 133 controller card. The second 80GB is a clone, can be
disregarded regarding this.

Plan to use the second SATA drive as hidden onboard clone.

Questions:

1. If I remap the SATAs as ide, will I suffer any performance degradation?

2. Do I just restore the image of my 80GB boot drive to the SATA? Will it
boot normally if configured as SATA, not a remap to ide?

3. Will I have to a repair or clean install of XP?

4. Does HAL change if the boot drive is changed from ide to SATA?

I usually don't multi-newsgroup post, but this seemed the best way.
Dave

Legacy versus native is explained on PDF page 11.

ftp://download.intel.com/design/chipsets/manuals/25267102.pdf

In legacy mode, a total of only four storage devices can be supported.
Legacy is used for OSes prior to Win2K/WinXP, which do not have the
necessary drivers. Legacy has two fixed IRQs (14 and 15) for interrupting.
The command and control are in the I/O space, at well known locations.
That is why an old Microsoft OS, which only knows about the well
known I/O addresses, can work.

In Native mode, the drives look like they are on a PCI card. The
storage devices appear relative to a BAR (PCI base address register).
Interrupt INTA# is a shared interrupt line used by PCI cards.
The data connection is not on the actual PCI bus, but can be
bridged to a higher speed internal bus. Thus, there is no need
in either case, for a bus bandwidth penalty. In that sense, it
is better than a lowly PCI card.

Win2K and WinXP, at a certain Service Pack level, will have a
Native driver that understands the PCI mapping. Since the drives
are in the PCI space, there is no artificial restriction of
four drives, as you'd get with the older legacy interface method.
That is how newer motherboards can make use of the large number
of SATA ports they've got.

When the SATA drive shows up, a driver will be needed. With Win2K or
WinXP, this driver could be provided by the OS, in which case you
might be unaware the driver is being used. I cannot answer whether
a repair install will be needed or not. Somehow the disk has to get
the right boot info, and I'm not up on the details of that.

The HAL should stay the same. You can see in the HALs listed here,
they are more concerned with single or multiple processors,
ACPI or non-ACPI support.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309283/en-us

Paul
 
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L

Lil' Dave

Paul said:
Legacy versus native is explained on PDF page 11.

ftp://download.intel.com/design/chipsets/manuals/25267102.pdf

In legacy mode, a total of only four storage devices can be supported.
Legacy is used for OSes prior to Win2K/WinXP, which do not have the
necessary drivers. Legacy has two fixed IRQs (14 and 15) for interrupting.
The command and control are in the I/O space, at well known locations.
That is why an old Microsoft OS, which only knows about the well
known I/O addresses, can work.

In Native mode, the drives look like they are on a PCI card. The
storage devices appear relative to a BAR (PCI base address register).
Interrupt INTA# is a shared interrupt line used by PCI cards.
The data connection is not on the actual PCI bus, but can be
bridged to a higher speed internal bus. Thus, there is no need
in either case, for a bus bandwidth penalty. In that sense, it
is better than a lowly PCI card.

Win2K and WinXP, at a certain Service Pack level, will have a
Native driver that understands the PCI mapping. Since the drives
are in the PCI space, there is no artificial restriction of
four drives, as you'd get with the older legacy interface method.
That is how newer motherboards can make use of the large number
of SATA ports they've got.

When the SATA drive shows up, a driver will be needed. With Win2K or
WinXP, this driver could be provided by the OS, in which case you
might be unaware the driver is being used. I cannot answer whether
a repair install will be needed or not. Somehow the disk has to get
the right boot info, and I'm not up on the details of that.

The HAL should stay the same. You can see in the HALs listed here,
they are more concerned with single or multiple processors,
ACPI or non-ACPI support.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309283/en-us

Paul

The motherboard has an Intel PE chipset.

2 potential problems not related to XP that I can see.
Windows Millenium is loaded on the first partition.
Another, the 3rd party boot manager software uses that partition for its
software location.

Basically, I'm stuck with 4 ide/SATA devices per the pdf document from
intel.

Motherboard manual says only XP has native drivers for this particular
motherboard regarding SATA controller. Motherboard released in 2003,
modified in 2004 which is the version I have.
Dave
 

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