Modem for Vista 64


X

XS11E

Back many weeks ago I asked about Vista 64 compatible modems, couldn't
find any drivers for my ancient Hayes WinModem. I looked at
Microsoft's compatibility list but found the pickings were very thin.

I finally admitted defeat and installed my USR Sportster external which
was my absolute last choice for two reasons, I wanted an internal modem
(no more power outlets!) and I use NetZero as a backup which doesn't
work well with USR modems* but.... I didn't want to buy something that
might or might not work so the USR is installed.

The reason for this post is to praise USR, my Sportster is a very old
one and it's NOT on MSFTs compatibility list nor would Vista 64 install
it using included drivers so I went to USR's site and found Vista 32
and Vista 64 drivers for a huge number of old, obsolete USR modems.
The downloaded driver worked perfectly and all is well.

So Kudos to USR, they're doing what we wish ALL manufacturers would do,
supporting legacy hardware!


*NetZero/Juno acknowledges the incompatibility problem with USR modems
which causes low speed connections and, last I heard, have no intention
of doing anything about it.
 
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R

Ronnie Vernon MVP

Usually products are not placed on the compatibility list unless the
manufacturer submits the product for testing and certification.

You might want to let Microsoft know about your experience with this modem.
Go to the following website to submit the feedback. Be sure to include the
speciifc brand, model number and any other details about the modem. Also
include the driver version as well as the URL for the website where you
found the drivers.

Send Feedback:
http://feedback.windowsvista.micros...kurl=http://support.microsoft.com/gp/cp_vista
 
D

Dale White

Funny enough, I just replaced an Internal USR model with an external one.
The problem with this model, is that A it was a winmodem and B, even with
USR supplied drivers, the modem would just disappear and Vista would report
the modem is no longer there. Of course, the reason I hate Internal modems,
was the only way to get that modem back, was to power cycle the PC (As a
reboot alone never works).

Something you might be interested in knowing, is the new USB based modems
don't have a Power supply, they pull their power from the USB port. I had my
doubts about not having external power, but the modem has worked better than
the Winmodem every did (even under XP)

I'm still shocked at the outageous cost of dial-up 56k modems. I could have
bought the top of the line model for $90, which is what I paid for the top
of the line model in 1995. Even the one I went with was $60, which is a bit
high, but if you have tt have it, they have you by the dingleberries.

In case you are in the need of an upgrade, I would recommend looking over
this modem, has it does rid you of the power cord
http://www.usr.com/support/product-template.asp?prod=5633b
 
X

XS11E

Dale White said:
I'm still shocked at the outageous cost of dial-up 56k modems.

The main reason I installed the Sportster is that I already had it
sitting on a shelf so the cost was $0.00 which I find an acceptable
cost! ;-)

I think the reason that dialup modems are so high is that sales are
probably way down, most computers came with built in modems until the
last couple of years and people who already have modems aren't looking
to replace them. I only need a modem to send/receive FAXes and that's
pretty seldom.
 
C

Charlie Russel - MVP

Good information, and thanks for the report back. This highlights something
that we've been saying here from the beginning - using super cheap
"winmodem" or "host based printer" solutions that require specialized
drivers is a bad idea if you like to be on the leading edge of technology.
The catchup period of drivers can definitely be an issue. And a solution
that takes all the smarts out of the device and requires that it be
connected to a Windows computer is going to definitely require a specialized
driver. It's why I also don't like USB connected DSL/Cable Modems. Bad idea.
Go with an Ethernet connected modem that plugs into a Router/Gateway and you
now have platform independence and no drivers required. Buy a printer that
understands PCL and PS both, and has a network card built in, and you are
assured of being able to use it on just about any OS out there. Buy a
standard external modem (ie, "hayes compatible") and you're likely to be
able to make it work. Or go with a company that has demonstrated that they
care and provide drivers for their legacy devices, like USR in this case.
 
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T

Tom Ferguson

I think the question in this instance involves a modem to connect
through telephone lines to another such modem or front-end
"concentrator", a communications hardware "bit" for a server farm rather
than modem for Ethernet/ADSL For cable connection. However, some of the
points you make remain valid, in particular, those concerning those
modems or modem/router/switches that implement some functions in
software rather than on-board hardware/circuitry.

Tom
MSMVP
Windows Shell/User
 
X

XS11E

Charlie Russel - MVP said:
Or go with a company that has demonstrated that they care and
provide drivers for their legacy devices, like USR in this case.

Amen! I also have to say nice things about Microtek, I have a
ScanMaker V6upl which is a pretty obsolete scanner but Microtek has
Vista 64 and XP 64 drivers. My Konica Minolta Magicolor 2400w isn't
current but they provide drivers for Vista 64. Logitech is a class
act, their Vista 64 driver created a conflict with Quicken, after going
through tech support they emailed me they would replace the SetPoint
software with an update that would resolve the conflict.

I think we might share the good companies along with dissing the rotten
outfits such as Epson that really don't care if your hardware works or
not.
 
C

Charlie Russel - MVP

Yes, Tom. I was merely extending out beyond just the simple modem issue to
dealing with 64-bit in a more general way. If folks want/need to be on the
bleeding edge of technology, as I certainly do, then they need to buy
intelligently to avoid problems.
 
C

Charlie Russel - MVP

Oh, believe me, we all try to share the good ones. Those of us who have been
here for >2 years have felt the pain of companies that can't be bothered to
support their hardware. And recognized the ones that do.
 
X

XS11E

Charlie Russel - MVP said:
Yes, Tom. I was merely extending out beyond just the simple modem
issue to dealing with 64-bit in a more general way. If folks
want/need to be on the bleeding edge of technology, as I certainly
do, then they need to buy intelligently to avoid problems.

Some of us, like myself, want to be on the bleeding edge of technology
but are unwilling to buy ANYTHING! I want my legacy hardware to work!
I did have to update my 10 year old 16MB video card in order to use
Vista's visual effects (now all turned off as being annoying) but
everything else is working. While my old Hayes modem wouldn't work my
older USR is working fine. Go figure.
 
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T

Tom Ferguson

OK, I narrowly construed something you intended to be construed more
widely.

Interestingly and amusingly, Christopher Davies wrote a book called
"Divided by a Common Language". It is a title probably derived from a
frequently-used quote speaking of British and USA peoples which is
usually attributed to either Oscar Wilde or George Bernard Shaw.

As I meander, totally befuddled if not completely amused, through this
pseudo-random, granular space we call life, I realize that I seldom
completely understand anything anyone says or writes.

Tom
 
C

Charlie Russel - MVP

Yes, we all want our legacy hardware to work. But, that being said,
virtually all of my legacy hardware DOES work. And has since XP x64 shipped.
Why? Because my legacy hardware was bought with future proofing in mind. My
modem is external, and isn't a "WinModem". It's a modem that is equally
useful in DOS, Windows 3x, Win9x, WinNT, Windows 2xxx, SCO UNIX, SuSe, or
Ubuntu. Why? Because it's got a standard Hayes AT command set, _in the
modem_. My printer? Yup, an HP LaserJet 1200 with an external HP JetDirect
print server. And the printer does both PCL5 and PostScript _in the
printer_, so it works with all of the operating systems listed above. My
Internet connection? A DSL Modem and a Cable Modem, each with an Ethernet
connection on the LAN side, connected to my dual-WAN router. Every single
operating system listed works just fine, and knows nothing about the details
my two ISPs think they should control. The router handles all that. Most of
my older computers have Adaptec SCSI cards in them. Why? Because just about
everything supports an Adaptec SCSI card, and Adaptec is really good about
providing updated drivers for all their cards.

You begin to see the pattern? In each case, I made a conscious decision to
spend slightly more when I bought the hardware, knowing that it was very
likely that I would be running some operating system on this network that
was short on drivers - either because it was an old OS or was UNIX or was a
beta OS or was a completely different architecture even. And that if I
wanted to be able to use my hardware, I'd best not buy anything that
required me to load some sort of applicatin in Windows before it would even
work.

If I had legacy hardware that didn't work, I certainly would be asking the
vendor when they planned on providing drivers. But I'd also be making a note
to myself to either avoid that vendor or avoid the particular hardware
decision that had me ending up with something that isn't supported.

It's certainly true that in some cases you can't avoid it - laptops are
notorious problems since you're at the mercy of the laptop vendor in almost
all cases. But when I bought my Acer Ferrari, I already knew that they
supported XP x64, and was confident that they would support Vista 64.
 
X

XS11E

Tom Ferguson said:
Interestingly and amusingly, Christopher Davies wrote a book
called "Divided by a Common Language". It is a title probably
derived from a frequently-used quote speaking of British and USA
peoples which is usually attributed to either Oscar Wilde or
George Bernard Shaw.

My favorite quote: "If the Brits can't learn proper English, let them
get their own damn language!" <- Isaac Asimov
 
G

Guest

Good point, Charlie!
I have my ADSL modem via router/ethernet and don't have to worry setting up
Internet connection ever.
Still struggling with the HP Deskjet printers/scanners connected to USB in
my PC and sharing it with the other PC's at home.
Carlos
 
C

Charlie Russel - MVP

Get a print server that can sit on the network. Much easier all around. I
use this ancient (as in 10 years old, at least) JetDirect Ex, but there are
now inexpensive wired and wireless print servers from a number of vendors.
Some even support USB from the print server to the printer.
 
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J

Jud Hendrix

I think we might share the good companies along with dissing the rotten
outfits such as Epson that really don't care if your hardware works or
not.

I have the vague feeling that in some cases the reason why there are no
drivers for newer versions operating systems, is that they want you to buy
new hardware! Well, if that is what they want, I will buy new hardware, but
not from them anymore :-D
Companies which take their customers seriously, should be rewarded with
buying their products, even if they are a bit more expensive, so they know
they do the right thing. And Charlie's advice about future-proof hardware
is worth gold!
As for Epson, I have an Epson scanner, and I think that Epson was one of
the first to release XP64-drivers for their scanners. And, those drivers
are still being updated.

jud
 
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X

XS11E

As for Epson, I have an Epson scanner, and I think that Epson was
one of the first to release XP64-drivers for their scanners.

I lost my $1,200 Epson scanner to Windows 2000, they refused to write a
driver for it saying the 2 year old scanner was "too old".

I'll never own another Epson product.
 

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