Migrating to SQLServer and Dot Net


G

Guest

Hi,

I work in a small team providing small to medium database applications using
MS Access.

I believe that using SQL Server and Dot net technologies I can provide
better and faster solutions. i.e. web based solutions.

Is there a MS recommended path for moving to SQL and Dot net?

For example is there a series of course I need to go on to up grade my skills?
 
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R

Rick Brandt

Paddy said:
Hi,

I work in a small team providing small to medium database
applications using MS Access.

I believe that using SQL Server and Dot net technologies I can provide
better and faster solutions. i.e. web based solutions.

Is there a MS recommended path for moving to SQL and Dot net?

For example is there a series of course I need to go on to up grade
my skills?
Sure. Learn SQL Server and learn dot-net and start plugging away. In about
2 or 3 years you might be half as productive as you are in Access (if you're
lucky).

I don't mean to discourage you but given your description of a "small team
providing small to medium database applications" you are looking at a pretty
huge learning curve that will NEVER get you where you are with Access
(assuming your Access skills are good).

I'm mostly speaking of dot-net here. SQL Server is easy to develop against,
but only if you don't also have to administer it. That could be an
additional workload that you don't want. If someone else will be in charge
of keeping the box running and backed up and all you have to do is build
tables, views, and stored procedures then that is no big deal (again
assuming good Access/database skills to start with).

Dot-net on the other hand has its place, but it is not in making small to
medium apps faster to develop or faster to use. If you *need* something
that can run in a web browser then dot-net is what I would recommend. If
you think something that runs in a web browser will be better or faster
though you will be disappointed.

Some day (as God is my witness :) ), I will see a web app that doesn't
suck. Hasn't happened yet though.
 
G

Guest

Thanks for the reply Rick,

I have two issues;

1. Using Access I'll never be able to develop larger projects. At the
moment the bigger project are put to tender in the private sector.

2. Other IT teams that I work with are starting to move to this type of
product.

Thanks
 
R

Rick Brandt

Paddy said:
Thanks for the reply Rick,

I have two issues;

1. Using Access I'll never be able to develop larger projects. At the
moment the bigger project are put to tender in the private sector.
Agree as far as using an MDB tro stroe the data. Totally disagree about using
Access as a front end to an enterprise level database (like SQL Server). I
will concede that there are people who need such apps who won't want you to use
Access, but as long as you're being paid by the hour then that's their problem
not yours. If you are being paid "per project" and get to choose (or at least
influence) the choice of front end you will be losing your shirt to use dot-net
compared to Access.
2. Other IT teams that I work with are starting to move to this type
of product.
And there it is. The reason that almost all new paradigms are adopted. I don't
deny the reality of it, but intellectually I have to shake my head.
 
G

Guest

Agree as far as using an MDB tro stroe the data. Totally disagree about
using
Access as a front end to an enterprise level database (like SQL Server). I
will concede that there are people who need such apps who won't want you to use
Access, but as long as you're being paid by the hour then that's their problem
not yours. If you are being paid "per project" and get to choose (or at least
influence) the choice of front end you will be losing your shirt to use dot-net
compared to Access.
Rick, are you recommending then that the next step from Access development
is to move up to the msde and .adp's? I only know VBA and DOA and wondering
what would be the best move from here. I know a several of my clients want
or will want web access shortly and the TS option sounds like a good one.
What are the advantages of using .adp and how do I get started?
 
G

Guest

Well I just read 'ADP Ready for Prime Time?'. So I am now assuming that the
answer to my questions will depend on who answers them.
 
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R

Rick Brandt

AlienzDDS said:
Rick, are you recommending then that the next step from Access
development is to move up to the msde and .adp's? I only know VBA
and DOA and wondering what would be the best move from here. I know
a several of my clients want or will want web access shortly and the
TS option sounds like a good one. What are the advantages of using
.adp and how do I get started?
I've never used an ADP, but haven't heard much good about them. I never
started looking at them because they are a SQL Server only solution and I
need to connect to other engines.

I just use ODBC from an MDB/MDE and strictly VBA/DAO.
 

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