migrate from .Net 2.0 to .Net 3.0


G

Guest

Hello everyone,


I am using Visual Studio 2005 and have some code built by both .Net
Framework 2.0 and .Net Compact Framework 2.0 (two separate builds).

I want to build and test the code in both .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0. I can not find any guide about how to setup
environment in Visual Studio 2005 to utilize .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0 to make builds, and setup both .Net Framework 3.0 and
..Net Compact Framework 3.0 environment to test the code (new build).

Maybe it is because .Net 3.0 is too new? Any tutorials to recommend?


thanks in advance,
George
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Vottero

George said:
Hello everyone,


I am using Visual Studio 2005 and have some code built by both .Net
Framework 2.0 and .Net Compact Framework 2.0 (two separate builds).

I want to build and test the code in both .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0. I can not find any guide about how to setup
environment in Visual Studio 2005 to utilize .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0 to make builds, and setup both .Net Framework 3.0
and
.Net Compact Framework 3.0 environment to test the code (new build).

Maybe it is because .Net 3.0 is too new? Any tutorials to recommend?

You don't really have anything to do. V3.0 is actually V2.0 with some new
stuff added, the old V2.0 bits didn't change. Since your app isn't using
any of the new V3.0 bits (WCF, WWF etc), your code won't change if you build
it in a V3.0 environment.
 
G

gregarican

Hello everyone,

I am using Visual Studio 2005 and have some code built by both .Net
Framework 2.0 and .Net Compact Framework 2.0 (two separate builds).

I want to build and test the code in both .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0. I can not find any guide about how to setup
environment in Visual Studio 2005 to utilize .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0 to make builds, and setup both .Net Framework 3.0 and
.Net Compact Framework 3.0 environment to test the code (new build).

Maybe it is because .Net 3.0 is too new? Any tutorials to recommend?

thanks in advance,
George

I personally haven't looked at much .NET 3.0 stuff, but I would assume
the first step is to install the .NET 3.0 Framework SDK and by that
token the various elements will be available in Visual Studio 2005.
From there maybe check out a book from your local library that
introduces you to the new additions and changes...
 
D

David R. Longnecker

George-

From my understanding, .NET 3.0 is simply .NET 2.0 with WPF, WCF, Workflow,
and CardSpace added on top--kind of like taking the framework and adding
additional modules. General functionality, like from .NET 1.1 to 2.0, didn't
change. The official Microsoft verbiage can be found at http://www.netfx3.com/content/WhatIsNetFx3.aspx
and http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsvista/bb188202.aspx.

From there, if you want to target 3.0 technologies, simply download the SDK:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...00-F358-4523-B479-F53D234CDCCF&displaylang=en

and the extensions for VS2005:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...37-CC86-4BF5-AE44-F5A1E805680D&displaylang=en

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...9E-1FA3-48CF-8023-E8F38E709BA6&displaylang=en

For tutorials on using the technology, both http://www.netfx3.com and http://windowsclient.net
have tutorials, FAQs, and information on creating and consuming WPF, WCF
and Workflow components.

HTH.

-dl
 
G

Guest

Yes, Ignacio. Are there any tutorials about how to make build/test with .Net
3.0?


regards,
George
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

Thanks John,


I am not using the new features, and I just want to make sure (be confident)
about my code and I want to build/test in .Net 3.0 environment. Do you have
any tutorials about how to make build/test in .Net 3.0?


regards,
George
 
G

Guest

hI David,


The materials you recommended is very helpful. Actually, my C# code is not
using any new features of .Net 3.0, and my purpose is simply to build and
test to make myself confident that the code can run and have similar
performance in .Net 3.0.

So, for the tutorials, I am more interested in how to make build in Visual
Studio 2005 (currently, I installed only .Net 2.0) with .Net 3.0, and how to
setup test environment with .Net 3.0. Do you have any tutorials for this
topic?


regards,
George
 
J

Jon Skeet [C# MVP]

George said:
The materials you recommended is very helpful. Actually, my C# code is not
using any new features of .Net 3.0, and my purpose is simply to build and
test to make myself confident that the code can run and have similar
performance in .Net 3.0.

..NET 3.0 is just .NET 2.0 plus some extra libraries. I very much doubt
that you'll find *any* incompatibilities or performance changes.
 
G

Guest

Thanks Jon,


I agree with you in theory. And I just want to make my hands dirty by making
application run in .Net 3.0. I have installed .Net 3.0 SDK in Visual Studio
2005, but I can not find any option to specify using .Net 3.0 to make a build
-- on my machine, both .Net 2.0 and .Net 3.0 are installed.

Any ideas?


regards,
George
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

Jon Skeet [C# MVP]

I agree with you in theory. And I just want to make my hands dirty by making
application run in .Net 3.0. I have installed .Net 3.0 SDK in Visual Studio
2005, but I can not find any option to specify using .Net 3.0 to make a build
-- on my machine, both .Net 2.0 and .Net 3.0 are installed.

Any ideas?

Look in your Microsoft.NET/Framework/v3.0 directory - there won't be
any System.dll etc there. Unless you're using the new .NET 3.0
assemblies, there really isn't any concept of building against .NET
3.0.

Jon
 
G

Guest

Thanks Jon,


Do you mean when we installed .Net Framework 3.0 in Visual Studio 2005, then
if we build an application using C#, it will be automatically using .Net 3.0?

Since previously I installed .Net Framework 2.0, I have some concerns about
whether user needs to select different library versions (2.0 or 3.0) in order
to build for the correct version and to reduce potential conflicts built by
different version SDK -- since I installed both .Net SDK 2.0 and .Net SDK 3.0.


regards,
George
 
D

David R. Longnecker

Like Jon said, it's not so much you develop against 3.0 like you do 2.0;
3.0 is only called on when you call those objects. Microsoft has somewhat
made our developer salespitch (to customers, managers, and to ourselves somedays
when we get confused) a bit difficult with their odd versioning.

3.0 is simply 2.0 with the Foundations (WinFX) added in. Think of it as
2.0+WPF,WCF,CardSpace--not so much 3.0. The libraries simply happened to
be "versioned" 3.0 (and someone at MSFT maybe thought it sounded cool).
To complicate matters, if you look at framework 3.5, the System.Web.Extensions
(AJAX) libraries are version 2.0.0.0. *sigh*

A good way to show the transition is in Orcas... urr.. VS2008. 2008 has
the ability to create projects targeting a specific framework--2.0, 3.0,
and 3.5. When you look at your available projects for 2.0, you see the normal
things you see in VS 2005. However, when you look at 3.0, you see additional
templates for the foundation projects--however they still consume the 2.0
libraries; it just adds references in to the additional foundation assemblies.

Somewhere around here, I have a document with an object-->framework map;
though I'm sure you can google it too--I think that's how I found it and
it made explaining it to peers FAR easier.

To address your SDK question--no, if you have the 3.0 SDK installed and happen
to consume those objects, your references will automagically (given you're
building in the VS IDE or have specified it using NAnt or such) couple those
libraries to your project in your config files. Your only concern is that
if you share your project, all of your developers need to have matching SDKs.
As far as I know, there is nothing in 3.0 that overlaps 2.0, simply appends
to the functionality of 2.0.

HTH.

-dl
 
D

David R. Longnecker

You can't "not" install .NET 2.0--installing VS 2005 will force it.

Think of it .NET 3.0 as the wallpaper (WPF), telephone line (WCF), and the
door locks (Cardspace) of a house. You wouldn't roll out just those items
because they're missing their foundation (.NET 2.0), which is the house itself.
Without 2.0, you wouldn't have System, System.Data, etc. :) In reverse,
though, your house CAN exist without wallpaper, telephone lines, or door
locks; they're simply accessories.

While I think I understand what you're trying to do, there is no real separation
between 2.0 and 3.0, 3.0 is simply 2.0+extras and requires 2.0 (AFAIK) to
be installed.

From the link you posted for the SDK download:

For customers that already have the .NET Framework 2.0 installed, this .NET
Framework 3.0 redistributable package installs only the new Windows Vista
components. This ensures that any .NET Framework 2.0-based applications work
seamlessly when the .NET Framework 3.0 is installed, with no application
migration or updates of any kind required.

-dl

--
David R. Longnecker
http://blog.tiredstudent.com
Thanks David,

I want to setup Runtime environment to make some tests. For a machine
which is empty (.Net 2.0 is not installed), I think I should install
the following Runtime SDK to enable .Net 3.0, right?

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=10CC340B-F857
-4A14-83F5-25634C3BF043&displaylang=en[^]

Any need to install .Net 2.0 Runtime before install the Microsoft .NET
Framework 3.0 Redistributable Package?

regards,
George
David R. Longnecker said:
Like Jon said, it's not so much you develop against 3.0 like you do
2.0; 3.0 is only called on when you call those objects. Microsoft
has somewhat made our developer salespitch (to customers, managers,
and to ourselves somedays when we get confused) a bit difficult with
their odd versioning.

3.0 is simply 2.0 with the Foundations (WinFX) added in. Think of it
as 2.0+WPF,WCF,CardSpace--not so much 3.0. The libraries simply
happened to be "versioned" 3.0 (and someone at MSFT maybe thought it
sounded cool). To complicate matters, if you look at framework 3.5,
the System.Web.Extensions (AJAX) libraries are version 2.0.0.0.
*sigh*

A good way to show the transition is in Orcas... urr.. VS2008. 2008
has the ability to create projects targeting a specific
framework--2.0, 3.0, and 3.5. When you look at your available
projects for 2.0, you see the normal things you see in VS 2005.
However, when you look at 3.0, you see additional templates for the
foundation projects--however they still consume the 2.0 libraries; it
just adds references in to the additional foundation assemblies.

Somewhere around here, I have a document with an object-->framework
map; though I'm sure you can google it too--I think that's how I
found it and it made explaining it to peers FAR easier.

To address your SDK question--no, if you have the 3.0 SDK installed
and happen to consume those objects, your references will
automagically (given you're building in the VS IDE or have specified
it using NAnt or such) couple those libraries to your project in your
config files. Your only concern is that if you share your project,
all of your developers need to have matching SDKs. As far as I know,
there is nothing in 3.0 that overlaps 2.0, simply appends to the
functionality of 2.0.

HTH.

-dl
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

gregarican

Hello everyone,

I am using Visual Studio 2005 and have some code built by both .Net
Framework 2.0 and .Net Compact Framework 2.0 (two separate builds).

I want to build and test the code in both .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0. I can not find any guide about how to setup
environment in Visual Studio 2005 to utilize .Net Framework 3.0 and .Net
Compact Framework 3.0 to make builds, and setup both .Net Framework 3.0 and
.Net Compact Framework 3.0 environment to test the code (new build).

Maybe it is because .Net 3.0 is too new? Any tutorials to recommend?

thanks in advance,
George

Out of curiosity why are you so anxious to use .NET 3.0? In terms of
production ready applications I've seen in most business environments
they are at the VB 6 or the .NET 1.1 level. A few at the .NET 2.0
level perhaps. But IMHO the .NET 3.0 platform is so new to me it seems
like a moving target. Why not wait 6 months or so for it to mature?
Then there likely will be a new Visual Studio release that will be
tightly integrated...
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top