Load a CSV into an empty, formatted XLS?


P

Paul H

I have an empty, formatted spreadsheet, that I created by writing a few rows
into it from my COBOL program, field by field, then deleting all of the
rows.

The process of creating the entire XLS or XLSX runs much too slow (100
records per minute or less), and uses memory up, so can never allow me to
finish converting some of my large CSV files into formatted XLS (Excel 2003)
or XLSX (Excel 2007) files. Someone told me to "turn off continual
re-calculating". How?

I wonder if I can somehow import my large .CSV file into my .XLS empty
formatted file? I cannot find a way. Any help would be appreciated.

TIA, Paul
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

JLatham

First question is how big are the CSV files, in terms of rows and columns.
Since Excel has native built in ability to import CSV files, I presume you
either have too many rows or too many columns. Hopefully not both.
 
J

JLatham

Oh, I forgot - The thing the guy was talking about was auto calculation. Set
it to Manual during the file import, set back to automatic later. It is
under Tools - Options - and is found on the [Calculation] tab.
 
P

Paul H

I have many .CSV files. The one I've been testing with has 5004 rows and 41
columns. Others have more rows, but few have this many columns. When I
import the .CSV, it is almost instant, but does not have columns formatted
correctly. I have text columns of various widths, date columns, percent
columns, numeric columns of various types, etc. So my COBOL programs
formats each column correctly. My empty .XLS file has these formatting
characteristics. So if I can import my .CVS into the empty .XLS file it
should have the columns like I want them.

I tried starting my program, stopping it so I could turn off recalc, then
resumed the process - it stayed very slow.

Importing my .CSV would appear to be my only option. I hope it can be
accomplished.

First question is how big are the CSV files, in terms of rows and columns.
Since Excel has native built in ability to import CSV files, I presume you
either have too many rows or too many columns. Hopefully not both.
 
P

Patrick Molloy

turn off screen updating too

Application.ScreenUpdating=False



JLatham said:
Oh, I forgot - The thing the guy was talking about was auto calculation.
Set
it to Manual during the file import, set back to automatic later. It is
under Tools - Options - and is found on the [Calculation] tab.


Paul H said:
I have an empty, formatted spreadsheet, that I created by writing a few
rows
into it from my COBOL program, field by field, then deleting all of the
rows.

The process of creating the entire XLS or XLSX runs much too slow (100
records per minute or less), and uses memory up, so can never allow me to
finish converting some of my large CSV files into formatted XLS (Excel
2003)
or XLSX (Excel 2007) files. Someone told me to "turn off continual
re-calculating". How?

I wonder if I can somehow import my large .CSV file into my .XLS empty
formatted file? I cannot find a way. Any help would be appreciated.

TIA, Paul
 
D

Dave Peterson

If you rename the .csv file to .txt, you may be able to import the file quicker
by setting each field the way you want.

Then you could format the numeric fields as percentages or whatever you needed.

If you have fields that have implicit decimals, you could import them as
Generals and then put a factor of 10 (10, 100, 1000, ...) in an empty cell.
Edit|copy, edit|paste special|Values and divide (all in code) to convert that
field.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

JLatham

Then you don't have need of either of my special purpose CSV importing tools.
Look at what Dave Peterson has to say later on in this thread.

If that is not enough, you could go through a one-time process of recording
a new macro into your Personal.xls workbook while you go through the
formatting of a workbook with imported data. If your formatting can be
applied per column then you should be able to use that recorded macro to
format your workbook(s) after importing the csv/txt file in the future.
 
P

Paul H

Thanks Dave,

I used your "import text" method and it does succeed in importing my .CSV
file into my empty .XLS file, in about 2 seconds. That is, after I
manually:

1. Open empty XLS file.
2. Data, import external data, import data.
3. "Select Data Source" screen comes up.
4. Type in my xxxx.TXT file name.
5. Import wizard step 1 - select delimited, then next.
6. Import wizard step 2 - select only Comma, then finish.
7. Import data to existing worksheet.
8. It imports the entire file in about 2 seconds, formatted correctly, with
columns as described in my empty .XLS file.

Now I need to figure out how to accomplish these steps automatically by my
COBOL program.

Thanks again,
Paul

=========================================================
If you rename the .csv file to .txt, you may be able to import the file
quicker
by setting each field the way you want.

Then you could format the numeric fields as percentages or whatever you
needed.

If you have fields that have implicit decimals, you could import them as
Generals and then put a factor of 10 (10, 100, 1000, ...) in an empty cell.
Edit|copy, edit|paste special|Values and divide (all in code) to convert
that
field.
=========================================================
 
P

Paul H

Thanks,"JLatham"
What are your "special purpose CSV importing tools"?
Dave's method works, but I still need to solve the problem of automating it.
Paul

Then you don't have need of either of my special purpose CSV importing
tools.
Look at what Dave Peterson has to say later on in this thread.

If that is not enough, you could go through a one-time process of recording
a new macro into your Personal.xls workbook while you go through the
formatting of a workbook with imported data. If your formatting can be
applied per column then you should be able to use that recorded macro to
format your workbook(s) after importing the csv/txt file in the future.
 
D

Dave Peterson

Maybe you could drop the requirement that the COBOL program do it.

Set up a workbook with two sheets (instructions for the user and the actual
data).

Record a macro that does all the work in the second sheet.

The plop a button from the Forms toolbar onto the instruction sheet that calls
that macro.

You only have to rename the worksheet if you're doing File|Open (or the
equivalent in code). If you use the import external data stuff, you can leave
it named .csv.
 
P

Paul H

=========================================================
I need the COBOL program to properly format the data. Multiple end-users
will use this, sometimes daily, with data that changes daily, so I have been
requested to make it completely automatic. Another subsequent program shows
them the choices of reports and automatically starts the one they select.
=========================================================

Maybe you could drop the requirement that the COBOL program do it.

Set up a workbook with two sheets (instructions for the user and the actual
data).

Record a macro that does all the work in the second sheet.

The plop a button from the Forms toolbar onto the instruction sheet that
calls
that macro.

You only have to rename the worksheet if you're doing File|Open (or the
equivalent in code). If you use the import external data stuff, you can
leave
it named .csv.=========================================================
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

Dave Peterson

It's too difficult to push a button?

If that's true, then name your macro Auto_Open. It'll run the first time
someone opens the workbook. You could plop the date into a cell in a hidden
sheet so that it only runs once. And add a save at the end.

If that doesn't work, good luck with the automation.
 
P

Paul H

=========================================================

How do I record a macro? Do you mean I can create a macro that will do my
steps 1 thru 8, below?

=========================================================
It's too difficult to push a button?

If that's true, then name your macro Auto_Open. It'll run the first time
someone opens the workbook. You could plop the date into a cell in a hidden
sheet so that it only runs once. And add a save at the end.

If that doesn't work, good luck with the automation.
 
J

JLatham

In Excel 2007 you will need to be able to see the [Developer] tab. If it is
not visible now, click the Office Button, then the [Excel Options] button
near the lower right of the window that opens. In the "Popular" group,
enable the "Show Developer tab in the ribbon" option.
To record a macro, choose the Developer tab and click the "Record Macro" -
give it a name and procede with the steps you wish to record. The "Record
Macro" option will have changed to "Stop Recording". Click it when you have
finished recording the steps you need to repeat later.

Paul H said:
=========================================================

How do I record a macro? Do you mean I can create a macro that will do my
steps 1 thru 8, below?

=========================================================
It's too difficult to push a button?

If that's true, then name your macro Auto_Open. It'll run the first time
someone opens the workbook. You could plop the date into a cell in a hidden
sheet so that it only runs once. And add a save at the end.

If that doesn't work, good luck with the automation.
 
P

Paul H

I tried it using Excel 2003 and it works there also. I'll try the entire
process tomorrow (Monday). Wish me luck, and thanks.
Paul

=========================================================

In Excel 2007 you will need to be able to see the [Developer] tab. If it is
not visible now, click the Office Button, then the [Excel Options] button
near the lower right of the window that opens. In the "Popular" group,
enable the "Show Developer tab in the ribbon" option.
To record a macro, choose the Developer tab and click the "Record Macro" -
give it a name and procede with the steps you wish to record. The "Record
Macro" option will have changed to "Stop Recording". Click it when you have
finished recording the steps you need to repeat later.

Paul H said:
=========================================================

How do I record a macro? Do you mean I can create a macro that will do my
steps 1 thru 8, below?

=========================================================
It's too difficult to push a button?

If that's true, then name your macro Auto_Open. It'll run the first time
someone opens the workbook. You could plop the date into a cell in a
hidden
sheet so that it only runs once. And add a save at the end.

If that doesn't work, good luck with the automation.
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Patrick Molloy

the macro recorder will show you the very basic VBA code. you'll want to
tidy up :)
but its a great way to start

Paul H said:
I tried it using Excel 2003 and it works there also. I'll try the entire
process tomorrow (Monday). Wish me luck, and thanks.
Paul

=========================================================

In Excel 2007 you will need to be able to see the [Developer] tab. If it
is
not visible now, click the Office Button, then the [Excel Options] button
near the lower right of the window that opens. In the "Popular" group,
enable the "Show Developer tab in the ribbon" option.
To record a macro, choose the Developer tab and click the "Record Macro" -
give it a name and procede with the steps you wish to record. The "Record
Macro" option will have changed to "Stop Recording". Click it when you
have
finished recording the steps you need to repeat later.

Paul H said:
=========================================================

How do I record a macro? Do you mean I can create a macro that will do
my
steps 1 thru 8, below?

=========================================================
It's too difficult to push a button?

If that's true, then name your macro Auto_Open. It'll run the first time
someone opens the workbook. You could plop the date into a cell in a
hidden
sheet so that it only runs once. And add a save at the end.

If that doesn't work, good luck with the automation.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top