Inaccessible_Boot_Device


T

Teilhard Knight

Hello:

I am trying to install Win 2K on a PIII 550MHz with 384 Meg RAM. I am not
very Knowledgeable about hardware, but Win XP reports a VIA IDE controller.

The problem is, I start installation in DOS, and when the system passes to
full Win 2K mode, I get:

Stop: 0x0000007B (0xF2463848, 0xC0000034, 0x0..., 0x0...).

I have researched the error, and I know the string outside the parenthesis
means I cannot access my HD (partition). The meaning of the first string
inside I haven't been able to spot. The references are too technical for me.
So, perhaps you guys can tell me what exactly the problem is. The second
string inside has a clear meaning which I sadly forget, but the cures based
on this information alone I undertake never got me to solve the problem. The
other two strings, as I understand are always zero.

I paid 10 bucks only to be told that the most probable cause is that the
installer does not have drivers for my IDE controller. I find hard to
believe this because I have partitioned the HD to have Win XP, Win 2K, and a
distribution of Linux together (80 Gb HD), and both Win XP and Linux
installed without a hitch. Besides, VIA does not provide IDE drivers one
could feed in a diskette to the installation, they claim they are always in
the installer of all flavours of Windows.

Any feedback to solve my problem will be greatly appreciated. I have spent a
great deal of time reading and trying (virus, etc.) and nothing.

Teilhard.
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

According to my book the Stop screen consists of a STOP
message, the text translation, the addresses of the
violating call, and the drivers loaded at the time of the
STOP screen. STOP screens give you and a product support
services engineer the necessary information to locate and
identify problem areas. Thats what is printed in my
book. Hope that gives you a little info.

Renee
 
R

Renee

do you have the the NT workstation Start Here Guide? If so
go to page 102. Basically says to run virus scan, check
(SCSI) for valid boot sector on the drive,IN BIOS: change
passive terminator to active, enable the SCSI adapter,
disable non-initiating SCSI adapters, set SCSI ID at 0,
make sure your system drive is the first drive on the IDE
controller on the motherboard, verify that I/O or disk
access are set to standard, verify that drive is jumpered
correctly for master , slave or single drive. Hope this
helps

Renee
 
T

Teilhard Knight

According to my book the Stop screen consists of a STOP
message, the text translation, the addresses of the
violating call, and the drivers loaded at the time of the
STOP screen. STOP screens give you and a product support
services engineer the necessary information to locate and
identify problem areas. Thats what is printed in my
book. Hope that gives you a little info.
Thanks, Renee, I knew as far as that. Apparently it is not that difficult
for a geek to decipher the error. In my case disconnecting the slave of the
HD did the trick. I do not know if that info was in those numbers.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

Teilhard Knight

Renee said:
do you have the the NT workstation Start Here Guide? If so
go to page 102. Basically says to run virus scan, check
(SCSI) for valid boot sector on the drive,IN BIOS: change
passive terminator to active, enable the SCSI adapter,
disable non-initiating SCSI adapters, set SCSI ID at 0,
make sure your system drive is the first drive on the IDE
controller on the motherboard, verify that I/O or disk
access are set to standard, verify that drive is jumpered
correctly for master , slave or single drive. Hope this
helps
Thanks again. I did all that which doesn't have to do with SCSI, because the
only thing SCSI I have in the system is a SCSI card I used to drive an old
Iomega external removable HD unit.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads


Top