How to clean install XP Home with Acronis True image 11


A

Alex

Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex
 
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P

Patrick Keenan

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

Yes. For my usage, the term "clone" is to a new active hard disk, "image"
is for a stored file.
When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.

That would be rather pointless. Even ntbackup ASR doesn't require it.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

It's #2. You boot from the Acronis CD and point it to the image.
Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

You might need to activate, you might not. This isn't a real problem,
since at worst it is a quick and free phone call.
If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Yes. But it's also not "no more junk", it's "no more data".

So before you restore, you need to be sure that you did actually also save
your data.

Restoring this way is a commitment.
Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play?

See your own explanation below, and your question above.
I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one?

See your question above for the reason.
From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Yes. But the restored image won't include data created after the image, so
casual use after a "crash" may not be appropriate.

HTH
-pk
 
B

Big_Al

Alex said this on 1/25/2009 8:11 PM:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex
Create your image.
Also have Acronis make a boot CD.
When you need to restore, you put the boot CD in the drive, boot, pick
the image (hopefully on some external media right?!) and restore it.
The restore rebuilds the HD. Its not a format but it just re-writes
everything back to day one.

I suggest you also test this procedure, not to the point of reloading
but I suggest you boot from the CD and try to find your image. Just
simply find it. Some people seem to have issues with external USB
drives or whatever. If you can find the image file and then abort
you're more than likely good to go.

The boot CD has value in that if you are horribly infected you can't
boot some times. Also I can't begin to count the number of problems
you would have running Acronis from a HD and trying to reload it at the
same time. A quite improbable function.
 
M

Max Wachtel

Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex

You want to create the bootable disk with the Acronis program. Then if
you get in trouble you can restore the image using the Acronis boot disk
(just follow the prompts). If you activated windows before you made the
image, then you will not have to do it again. You do not need to
partition or format or use the windows install disk again because you
already have a clean/fresh install from the image of your fresh/clean
install. Works very well- I have never had a problem using it.
 
J

JS

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?
You create an "Image Backup" and not a clone.
It's best to store the image backup file to external media.
When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

You use the True Image "Rescue CD" and boot from this CD to
restore the PC back to that "fresh install with everything set and
installed" state.

Note: You need to create the "Rescue CD" after you install True
Image, so the user's manual on how to create the CD.
Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore? No.


If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?
Your boot drive will be overwritten and only contains what was on
the boot drive when you created the image backup. So all updates
to Windows and applications installed after creating the
image backup will need to be reapplied
Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?
If your hard drive should fail then the only way you can restore the
image is by booting from the CD and using that image file you save
on external media.

Note: I use Norton's Ghost and that is the exact process I used
(Norton's Restore CD) to restore the image file to a new drive
yesterday as my old boot drive was failing.

This is the PC I'm using now and it's exactly as it was when I created
the image backup file.
Thanks in advance for the help

Alex

JS
http://www.pagestart.com
 
G

Gary Brandenburg

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex

Alex-
You don't need to create a boot disk if you have the Acronis install disk, in spite
of what the last 2 responders say.
(perhaps they didn't see the part about you having this disk,already)

~Gary
 
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G

Gary Brandenburg

Alex-
You don't need to create a boot disk if you have the Acronis install disk, in spite
of what the last 2 responders say.
(perhaps they didn't see the part about you having this disk,already)

~Gary
Make that-the last 3 responders.(before mine)
You have a bootable disk with the Acronis disk.

From the user manual:
<snip>

If you purchased the boxed product, you already have such a bootable CD, because the
installation CD contains, besides the program installation files, the Acronis True
Image Home standalone bootable version.

If you purchased Acronis True Image Home on the Web, you can create bootable media
using the Bootable Rescue Media Builder.

<end of snip>

~Gary
 
R

RMD

Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex

Alex,

I've restored XP computers quite a few times from a C-drive image
file. (Which btw must use the Acronis TI boot CD to do this, as others
have said.)

I've never had to reactivate XP, even when I've upgraded the C-drive
to a new bigger drive.

Btw I always do my image backup to a second hard drive (or a second
partition on a single drive), since I have sometimes had trouble
getting the Acronis TI boot CD to find USB external drives with some
computers. With an internal second drive or partition Acronis TI is
sure-fire never-fail.

Ross
 
L

Lil' Dave

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

A simple answer to this may reside in what type of media you intend to save
this data to. This you never divulge in your post, only ask regarding a
bootable CD containing TI's boot files. A clone can only be saved to
another hard drive with adequate empty space for another partition, not free
file space.
When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.

TI doesn't use the virtual boot image method used by another maker of
imaging software for restoration of the boot partition. So, this method
will not work for the your intended purpose.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

If you boot from TI's boot CD, yes.
Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

As long as the hardware did not change since you made the original image.
If the hardware has since changed, you open a Pandora's box of what ifs and
what hardware changes will cause the activation requirement to be required.
If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

The boot partition will be wiped, a new partition written based on the data
on the saved image, then the file system and corresponding files will be
recreated from the data on the saved image, subsequently, the master boot
record of the hard disk drive will be updated..
Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I

When you intend to recreate your boot partition from media that only
contains the image file. Or, when a CD written with the TI boot files fails
to recognize the boot section of the CD while attempting to boot from that.
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

See my reply above.
 
T

Theslaz

RMD said:
Alex,

I've restored XP computers quite a few times from a C-drive image
file. (Which btw must use the Acronis TI boot CD to do this, as others
have said.)

I've never had to reactivate XP, even when I've upgraded the C-drive
to a new bigger drive.

Btw I always do my image backup to a second hard drive (or a second
partition on a single drive), since I have sometimes had trouble
getting the Acronis TI boot CD to find USB external drives with some
computers. With an internal second drive or partition Acronis TI is
sure-fire never-fail.

Ross
From personal experience; I would suggest to anyone that you do not put
your eggs all in one basket. Use two different programs to back up your
data. I now use Acronis and a small free ware program called DriveImage
XML. Reason being; just last week I attempted to restore my computer via
a Acronis back up image I had; half way through the restore procedure;
Acronis said that the back up image was corrupt and it couldn't proceed.
Was left with a computer with no operating system and of course no
files. Had to do a restore from the original setup disk. No big deal;
but that won't happen again.
I also agree with a previous poster that mentioned that you should
"Test" your back up file; just to see if it is a good working file.

One mans opinion!!
 
M

Mike Torello

Theslaz said:
From personal experience; I would suggest to anyone that you do not put
your eggs all in one basket. Use two different programs to back up your
data. I now use Acronis and a small free ware program called DriveImage
XML. Reason being; just last week I attempted to restore my computer via
a Acronis back up image I had; half way through the restore procedure;
Acronis said that the back up image was corrupt and it couldn't proceed.
Was left with a computer with no operating system and of course no
files. Had to do a restore from the original setup disk. No big deal;
but that won't happen again.

Might be a good reason to keep a couple older backups.
 
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A

Alex

Thanks all for your valuable input. I have successfully created a disk
image and saved it on my external usb drive. Then I created a bootable
rescue cd. I started the pc with the cd and I could navigate through
the acronis user interface. From there I selected the option to
validate backup image. It appears to be a valid backup since I didn't
get any warnings.

Some questions:
1) when making a disk image, there was a box that I left unchecked
that said "create an image using the sector-by-sector approach". Is it
recommended to use this method or not? I left it OFF (default) since I
got an indication that the backup would be 4 times smaller.

2) another option was to split the archive. I left this setting to
automatic. Now I have 9 separate backup files of each around 4GB
large. Can't it make one large file? There was no option for not
splitting.

3) when validating the backup, do you have to do this for each of the
9 files or is it sufficiënt to highlight the number 1 file? It takes
about 20min to validate one file. And if the validation process is
successful, does that mean that a restore would be successful too?
 
J

JS

The reason you have nine files is that your USB
drive is formatted FAT32, which has a file size
limit of 4GB.

Most USB drive manufactures format USB drives
as FAT for compatibility with other Operating Systems.

If the Image Backup you created was a test
backup, then start over by formatting the USB
drive as NTFS and then create another image
backup.

As for your other two questions I can't help
as I use Norton's Ghost, and if you had Ghost
you would still see nine files.

--
JS
http://www.pagestart.com


Thanks all for your valuable input. I have successfully created a disk
image and saved it on my external usb drive. Then I created a bootable
rescue cd. I started the pc with the cd and I could navigate through
the acronis user interface. From there I selected the option to
validate backup image. It appears to be a valid backup since I didn't
get any warnings.

Some questions:
1) when making a disk image, there was a box that I left unchecked
that said "create an image using the sector-by-sector approach". Is it
recommended to use this method or not? I left it OFF (default) since I
got an indication that the backup would be 4 times smaller.

2) another option was to split the archive. I left this setting to
automatic. Now I have 9 separate backup files of each around 4GB
large. Can't it make one large file? There was no option for not
splitting.

3) when validating the backup, do you have to do this for each of the
9 files or is it sufficiënt to highlight the number 1 file? It takes
about 20min to validate one file. And if the validation process is
successful, does that mean that a restore would be successful too?
 
T

Twayne

Thanks all for your valuable input. I have
successfully
created a disk image and saved it on my external
usb
drive. Then I created a bootable rescue cd. I
started the
pc with the cd and I could navigate through the
acronis
user interface. From there I selected the option
to
validate backup image. It appears to be a valid
backup
since I didn't get any warnings.

Some questions:
1) when making a disk image, there was a box
that I left
unchecked that said "create an image using the
sector-by-sector approach". Is it recommended to
use this
method or not? I left it OFF (default) since I
got an
indication that the backup would be 4 times
smaller.

Sector-by-sector would usually be a "clone"
operation but I don't know what TI does; I'm a
Ghost user myself. That way when you do a
Restore, everythign goes back to exactly the same
position on the disk; fragmentation and all. Not
sure what TI is about though; see the manual, I
guess.
2) another option was to split the archive. I
left this
setting to automatic. Now I have 9 separate
backup files
of each around 4GB large. Can't it make one
large file?
There was no option for not splitting.

As someone mentioned, if the disk is FAT
formatted, 4 Gig is the largest file size it can
manage. The other possibility if it's an NTFS
formatted drive is that it chunked the files so
they could be copied to DVD (abt 4.3 Gig max more
or less actually fits on them) unless you have the
newest types.
I create 3.9 Gig chunks on mine so anytime I
want to I can create a set of DVDs for permanent
storage if I wish to, in order to keep various
configurations around. Once in a great while I
want something from one of those old archives
that's not on the machine anymore.
If the drive is NTFS formatted, then I'm sure
TI could create just one file instead of the
several smaller ones. Time to RTFM, probably.
I've never heard anyone say TI can't make just one
file for a backup and I'm sure it would have been
discussed were that the case. Am I wrong?
3) when validating the backup, do you have to do
this for
each of the 9 files or is it sufficiënt to
highlight the
number 1 file? It takes about 20min to validate
one file.
And if the validation process is successful,
does that
mean that a restore would be successful too?

Everybody is liable to have a different opinion
here. When something is new, I usually have it
validate everything the first several times. If
no validation errors ever occur, then I turn it
off for any backups that don't occur unattended.
To me it's just a way to make sure your machine is
perfectly compatible with the software and once
you're sure it is, there's no more need to
validate everything unless you think there are
problems occurring; in which case I'd turn it back
on if it was off.

Once you get going, the extra time cost of things
like validation aren't really an issue because
you'll likely schedule backups, incrementals,
whatever, to happen overnight whle the machine is
unattended. It gets real old in a hurry watching
a backup happen and trying to do other things too,
which just extends the length of time the backup
takes. Basically, I don't watch pots boil; the
novelty can wear off pretty quick<g>.

HTH,

Twayne
 
A

Alex

The reason you have nine files is that your USB
drive is formatted FAT32, which has a file size
limit of 4GB.

Most USB drive manufactures format USB drives
as FAT for compatibility with other Operating Systems.

If the Image Backup you created was a test
backup, then start over by formatting the USB
drive as NTFS and then create another image
backup.

Great, that explains the split files. I had the external usb drive
attached as a NAS to my router and apparently I couldn't format the
drive in NTFS so it was FAT. I plugged the external drive directly to
my pc now and formatted it in NTFS as it should be! Now I have only
one backup file of around 36GB. I think I now know the most important
stuff how to use a disk image, thanks all for that.
Now that I mentioned NAS, does anyone know why the original file dates
get changed as soon as I copied a file to the external usb drive that
was connected to my router? For instance, a file last edited 2 weeks
ago would after copying it to the NAS have the actual date and time.
This is annoying since an incremental backup would overwrite ALL files
instead of only the changed ones. I have this question in another
thread but it's still unanswered. Thought you backup-pro's would
know:) Maybe it's a problem inherent to usb nas drives only but not
when you have a real NAS with fast/gigabit ethernet port?
Thanks!
 
G

Guest

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex
My experience is with TI 7 and 8, so may not apply 100%...but here
are some things to consider.

Job ONE at M$ is prevention of software piracy. The will do everything
possible to prevent copying. That significantly complicates backing
up/restoring.
Job TWO at M$ is security. They don't want you to be able to access
other's data via a backup.
Because of those, I suggest you ALWAYS boot from the rescue media
when imaging your drive. While you can backup from within windows, you're
at the mercy of the latest M$ security and antipiracy "fixes".

Remove any extra memory devices. I've had issues when TI
enumerated drives differently from Windows.

Always test your images by restoring to a blank disk. Just yesterday,
I had a TI restore go to 100% then crash...sorry for any inconvenience.

Always have a windows install disk handy. fixboot has saved my bacon more
than once.
 
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A

Alex

My experience is with TI 7 and 8, so may not apply 100%...but here
are some things to consider.

Job ONE at M$ is prevention of software piracy.  The will do everything
possible to prevent copying.  That significantly complicates backing
up/restoring.
Job TWO at M$ is security.  They don't want you to be able to access
other's data via a backup.
Because of those, I suggest you ALWAYS boot from the rescue media
when imaging your drive.  While you can backup from within windows, you're
at the mercy of the latest M$ security and antipiracy "fixes".

Remove any extra memory devices.  I've had issues when TI
enumerated drives differently from Windows.

Always test your images by restoring to a blank disk.  Just yesterday,
I had a TI restore go to 100% then crash...sorry for any inconvenience.

Always have a windows install disk handy.  fixboot has saved my bacon more
than once.

So what you're saying is when you make backups with TI you should do
this from a non-windows environment by booting with the TI rescue disk
and running the backup form there, just as you would with a restore
process? Thanks for this important info, I haven't read this anywhere
yet.

PS: You forgot M$'s most important job: screw all users by making NON-M
$ software+hardware incompatible with their products and screwing them
even more by making sure everyone has to continuously upgrade their M$
software+hardware to maintain compatibility WITHIN M$ products. User
friendliness is what they call it I think. What will be their next
step, a toilet seat that runs on windows shitsta v1.2.5.62.1./5b for
which you have to download updates to be able to flush it??
 
A

Alex

My experience is with TI 7 and 8, so may not apply 100%...but here
are some things to consider.

Job ONE at M$ is prevention of software piracy.  The will do everything
possible to prevent copying.  That significantly complicates backing
up/restoring.
Job TWO at M$ is security.  They don't want you to be able to access
other's data via a backup.
Because of those, I suggest you ALWAYS boot from the rescue media
when imaging your drive.  While you can backup from within windows, you're
at the mercy of the latest M$ security and antipiracy "fixes".

Remove any extra memory devices.  I've had issues when TI
enumerated drives differently from Windows.

Always test your images by restoring to a blank disk.  Just yesterday,
I had a TI restore go to 100% then crash...sorry for any inconvenience.

Always have a windows install disk handy.  fixboot has saved my bacon more
than once.

So what you're saying is when you make backups with TI you should do
this from a non-windows environment by booting with the TI rescue disk
and running the backup form there, just as you would with a restore
process? Thanks for this important info, I haven't read this anywhere
yet.

PS: You forgot M$'s most important job: screw all users by making NON-
M
$ software+hardware incompatible with their products and screwing them
even more by making sure everyone has to continuously upgrade their M$
software+hardware to maintain compatibility WITHIN M$ products. User
friendliness is what they call it I think. What will be their next
step, a toilet seat that runs on windows PISSTA v1.2.5.62.1./5b for
which you have to download updates to be able to flush it??
 
A

Alex

My experience is with TI 7 and 8, so may not apply 100%...but here
are some things to consider.

Job ONE at M$ is prevention of software piracy.  The will do everything
possible to prevent copying.  That significantly complicates backing
up/restoring.
Job TWO at M$ is security.  They don't want you to be able to access
other's data via a backup.
Because of those, I suggest you ALWAYS boot from the rescue media
when imaging your drive.  While you can backup from within windows, you're
at the mercy of the latest M$ security and antipiracy "fixes".

Remove any extra memory devices.  I've had issues when TI
enumerated drives differently from Windows.

Always test your images by restoring to a blank disk.  Just yesterday,
I had a TI restore go to 100% then crash...sorry for any inconvenience.

Always have a windows install disk handy.  fixboot has saved my bacon more
than once.

So what you're saying is when you make backups with TI you should do
this from a non-windows environment by booting with the TI rescue disk
and running the backup form there, just as you would with a restore
process? Thanks for this important info, I haven't read this anywhere
yet.

PS: You forgot M$'s most important job: screw all users by making NON-M
$ software+hardware incompatible with their products and screwing them
even more by making sure everyone has to continuously upgrade their M$
software+hardware to maintain compatibility WITHIN M$ products. User
friendliness is what they call it I think. What will be their next
step, a toilet seat that runs on windows PISSTA v1.2.5.62.1./5b for
which you have to download updates to be able to flush it??
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Anna

Alex said:
Hello all,

I have done a clean install of windows xp home and I have spent the
last 2 weeks updating, reinstalling and configuring programs the way I
want it to be. Since I now have a fresh install with everything set
and installed as I want, now I would like to 'freeze' this computer
state so that I can restore the system in no time in case of a crash
or just when doing the next clean install. I have been reading how to
use Acronis True Image 11 and if I understand this well, it is best to
create a disk image for this purpose and not a clone, right?

When later the need to start with a fresh/clean install arises, which
of the 2 methods do I have to follow:
1) install xp the classic way: boot with xp cd, delete partition,
create partition, quick format partition and install xp via the user
interface. Then reboot, install all drivers, install Acronis True
image 11 and use it to restore the disk image that I created.
OR
2) Simply use Acronis True image 11 to restore the saved disk image
without going through the xp setup stuff.

Will I have problems with windows activation/registration warnings
after I did the restore?

If using method 2 from above, will my boot drive be erased and
overwritten with the clean image (in other words, no more junk that
slows down the system)?

Last question: when does a bootable rescue media cd come into play? I
know how to create it but what's the advantage of having one? From
what I understand, it's a bootable cd that also contains the Acronis
True image 11 program so that you can boot up with it after your
computer crashed and start Acronis True image 11 from the CD and then
use it to restore your saved image?

Thanks in advance for the help

Alex


Alex:
I know you've rec'd quite a few responses to your post so perhaps your
queries have been answered to your satisfaction. But in case they haven't...

Perhaps the following step-by-step instructions for using the ATI program
may be of some value to you. I prepared them some time ago for members of a
local computer club and as you will note they apply to versions 9 & 10 of
the ATI program, so I'm not entirely sure whether they will likewise apply
to your version 11 although I believe the general steps should apply with
some minor modifications. In any event, here they are...

Step-by-Step Instructions for Using the Acronis True Image Program to Backup
& Restore One's Hard Drive...

Using the Acronis True Image program there are two different approaches one
can take to back up the entire contents of one's day-to-day working HDD,
i.e., the operating system, all programs & applications, and user-created
data - in short, *everything* that's on one's HDD...

1. Direct disk-to-disk cloning, or,
2. Creating disk images

By using either of these strategies the user can restore his or her system
should their day-to-day working HDD become inoperable because of
mechanical/electronic failure of the disk or corruption of the system
resulting in a dysfunctional operating system.

In undertaking either of these two backup & recovery processes you're
dealing with two hard drives - the so-called source & destination disks -
the source disk being the HDD you're backing up and the destination disk
being the HDD that will be the recipient of the cloned contents of the
source disk or the recipient of the disk image you will be creating.

When using either process it's usually best for most users to use an
external HDD as the destination drive, i.e., the recipient of the cloned
contents of the source disk or the recipient of the created disk image. This
can be either a USB or Firewire or SATA external HDD. While another internal
HDD can also serve as the destination disk there's an additional element of
safety in using an external HDD since that drive will be ordinarily
disconnected from the system except during the disk cloning or recovery
process.

One other suggestion. After you install the Acronis program on your computer
it's a good idea to create what Acronis calls their "Bootable Rescue Media"
(CD). In most cases the recovery process (described below) will utilize that
Acronis bootable CD to restore your system. This "rescue" CD is easily
created from the program by clicking on the "Create Bootable Rescue Media"
icon on the opening Acronis screen and simply going through the screens to
create the bootable CD.

The Acronis True Image program CD is also bootable.

The following are step-by-step instructions for using the Acronis True Image
9 program to clone the contents of one HDD to an external HDD. (The steps
are essentially the same using the newer ATI 10 version):

1. With both hard drives (source & destination disks) connected, boot up.
Ensure that no other storage devices, e.g., flash drives, ZIP drives, etc.,
are connected. It's also probably a good idea to shut down any programs you
may have working in the background - including any anti-virus anti-spyware
programs - before undertaking this disk-to-disk cloning operation.

2. Access the Acronis True Image 9 program and under "Pick a Task", click
on "Clone Disk". (In the ATI 10 version click on "Manage Hard Disks" in the
"Pick a Tool" area and on the next screen click on "Clone Disk").

3. On the next "Welcome to the Disk Clone Wizard!" window, click Next.

4. On the next "Clone Mode" window select the Automatic option (it should
be the default option selected) and click Next.

5. On the next "Source Hard Disk" window, ensure that the correct source
HDD (the disk you're cloning from) has been selected (click to highlight).
Click Next.

6. On the next "Destination Hard Disk" window, ensure that the correct
destination HDD (the disk you're cloning to) has been selected (again, click
to highlight). Click Next.

7. On the next window, select the option "Delete partitions on the
destination hard disk". Understand that all data presently on the disk that
will be the recipient of the clone will be deleted prior to the disk cloning
operation. Click Next.

8. The next window will reflect the source and destination disks. Again,
confirm that the correct drives have been selected. Click Next.

9. On the next window click on the Proceed button. A message box will
display indicating that a reboot will be required to undertake the disk
cloning operation. Click Reboot.

10. The cloning operation will proceed during the reboot. With modern
components and a medium to high-powered processor, data transfer rate will
be somewhere in the range of about 450 MB/min to 800 MB/min when cloning to
a USB external HDD; considerably faster when cloning to another internal
HDD.

11. When the disk cloning operation has been completed, a message will
(usually) appear indicating the disk cloning process has been successful and
instructs you to shut down the computer by pressing any key. Do so and
disconnect your USB external HDD. If, however, the destination drive (the
recipient of the clone) has been another *internal* HDD, see the NOTE below.

12. Note that the cloned contents now residing on the USB external HDD take
on the file system of the source drive. For example, if prior to the
disk-cloning operation your USB external HDD had been FAT32-formatted and
your XP OS was NTFS-formatted, the cloned contents will be NTFS-formatted.

There is no need to format the USB external HDD prior to the disk-cloning
operation. Similarly, there is no need prior to the disk-cloning operation
to format an internal HDD should you be using an internal HDD as the
destination drive .

13. Restoration of the system can be achieved by cloning the contents of the
data residing on the external HDD to an internal HDD through the normal
disk-cloning process as described above.

NOTE: Just one other point that should be emphasized with respect to the
disk cloning operation should the recipient of the clone be another internal
HDD and not a USB or Firewire external HDD. Immediately following the disk
cloning operation the machine should be shutdown and the source HDD should
be disconnected. Boot ONLY to the newly-cloned drive. DO NOT BOOT
IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CLONING OPERATION WITH BOTH DRIVES CONNECTED.
There's a strong possibility that by doing so it is likely to cause future
boot problems with the cloned drive. Obviously there is no problem in this
area should a USB or Firewire EHD be the recipient of the clone since that
device is not ordinarily bootable in an XP environment.


Disk Imaging: The following are step-by-step instructions for using the
Acronis True Image 9 Program to create disk images for backup purposes and
using those disk images for recovery of the system. (The steps are
essentially the same using the newer ATI 10 version):

Note: The recipient of the disk image, presumably a USB external HDD or an
internal HDD, ordinarily must be a formatted drive and have a drive letter
assigned to it. Recall that in the case of a disk-to-disk cloning operation
as previously described, an unformatted or "virgin" HDD can be used as the
destination disk.

Before undertaking this disk imaging process it's probably best to close all
programs running in the background including your anti-virus and other
anti-malware programs.

1. With both your source and destination hard drives connected, access the
Acronis program and click "Backup" on main menu.

2. The "Create Backup Wizard" screen opens. Click Next.

3. The "Select Backup Type" screen opens with two options: a. The entire
disk contents or individual partitions. b. Files and folders. Select a. and
click Next.

(In the ATI 10 version four options will be listed: My Computer, My Data, My
Application Settings, and My E-mail. Select the My Computer option and click
Next.)

4. The "Partitions Selection" screen opens. Disk 1 and Disk 2 are listed
with their drive letter designations. Check the disk to be backed up -
presumably Disk 1 - and click Next.

5. An informational message appears recommending an incremental or
differential backup if an original full backup had previously been created.
Since this will be the first backup we will be selecting, just click OK to
close the message box. (You can tick the box not to show that informational
message in the future).

6. Next screen is the "Backup Archive Location". In the "File name:" text
box, (in ATI 10 version it's the "Folder:" text box) enter your backup drive
letter and enter a file name for the backup file, e.g., "F:\Backup 6-25".
The Acronis program will automatically append the ".tib" file extension to
the filename. Click Next.

7. "Select Backup Mode" screen opens. Select "Create a new full backup
archive" option and click Next.

8. "Choose Backup Options" screen opens with two options:
a. Use default options
b. Set the options manually.
If you select the b. option, you can select various options listed on the
next screen. Two of them are of interest to us:

Compression level - Four options - None, Normal (the default), High,
Maximum. There's a "Description" area that shows the estimated size of the
backup archive depending upon the option chosen, and the estimated "creation
time" for each option.

Backup priority - Three options - Low, Normal, or High
Low - "backup processed more slowly, but it will not influence other
processes running on computer."
(Default) Normal - "normal speed but backup process will influence other
processes running on computer."
High - "normal speed but backup process will strongly influence other
processes running on computer."

With respect to the compression levels, we've found that when using the
Normal option the original data is compressed by about 20% - 25% (in some
cases much greater) and that the High and Maximum options will result in a
compressed backup file only slightly higher. However, the amount of time to
create the backup files when using the High or Maximum compression level is
substantially greater than when using the Normal compression level. So
unless disk space is very tight on the destination drive, i.e., the drive
where the backup file will be saved, we recommend using the Normal
compression level (at least initially).

NOTE: You can set the Compression level and Backup priority defaults from
the Acronis Tools > Options > Default backup options menu items.

9. "Archive comments" screen opens allowing you to add comments to the
backup archive which you can review during the Recovery process. Click Next.

10. The next screen summarizes the backup operation to be performed. Review
the information for correctness and click the Proceed button.

11. The next screen will display status bars reflecting the progress of the
backup operation. After the backup operation finishes, an informational
message will appear indicting the operation was successfully completed.


Incremental Backups (Disk Images)
1. After the initial backup archive has been created you can create
incremental backups reflecting any data changes since the previous backup
operation. This incremental backup process proceeds considerably faster than
the initial backup operation. This, of course, is a major advantage of
creating disk images rather than undertaking the disk-to-disk cloning
process. Then too, since these created disk images are compressed files they
are reasonable in size. And because the incremental disk images can usually
be created very quickly (as compared with the direct disk-to-disk cloning
process), there's an incentive for the user to keep his/her system
up-to-date backup-wise by using this disk imaging process on a more frequent
basis than the disk-cloning process.

Note that you must create the incremental backup files on the same HDD where
you stored the original backup archive and any subsequent incremental backup
files.

2. Access the Acronis program as detailed above and move through the
screens. When you arrive at the "Backup Archive Location" screen, click on
the original backup archive file, or if one or more incremental backup files
were previously created, click on the last incremental backup file and
verify that the correct drive letter and file name are shown in the "File
name:" text box. After clicking Next, the program will automatically create
a file name for the incremental backup archive file, using the original file
name and appending a consecutive number - starting at 2 - at the end of the
file name. For example, say you named the original backup archive file
"Backup 6-25". The first incremental backup file will be automatically named
"Backup 6-252" and the next incremental file "Backup 6-253", etc.

NOTE THAT ALL YOUR INCREMENTAL BACKUP FILES MUST BE PRESENT FOR RECOVERY
PURPOSES. DO NOT DELETE ANY OF YOUR PREVIOUSLY-CREATED INCREMENTAL BACKUP
FILES FOLLOWING THE CREATION OF A CURRENT INCREMENTAL BACKUP FILE. YOU CAN
DELETE THE INCREMENTAL FILES ONLY AFTER CREATING A FULL BACKUP ARCHIVE AS
DESCRIBED IN THE PREVIOUS SECTION.

3. On the following "Select Backup Mode" screen, select the "Create
incremental Backup" option, click Next, and proceed through the screens as
you did in creating the initial backup archive.


Recovery Process (Disk images): We'll assume the recovery will be to either
a non-defective HDD that has become unbootable for one reason or another, or
to a new HDD. The HDD to be restored need not be partitioned/formatted since
the recovery process will take care of that function.

Note that in most cases you will be using the Acronis "Bootable Rescue
"Media" (CD) that you created when you originally installed the Acronis
program. If you didn't create that bootable CD at that time, you can create
it now from the Acronis program (assuming You can access the program at this
time) by clicking on the "Create Bootable Rescue Media" icon on the opening
Acronis screen and simply going through the screens to create the bootable
CD.

The Acronis True Image program CD is also bootable.

Note: If the recovery will be made to a HDD that is still bootable and
you're able to access the Acronis program on that drive, then you can
undertake the recovery process without the need for using the "bootable
rescue" CD.

1. With both the drive containing the backup disk images and the drive you
want to restore connected and with the bootable rescue CD inserted, boot up.

2. At the opening screen, click on "Acronis True Image Home (Full Version)".

3. The program will open after some moments. On the "Pick a Task" screen
that opens, click on "Recovery".

4. The "Welcome to the Restore Data Wizard!" screen opens. Click on Next.

5. The "Archive Selection" screen opens. Navigate to the drive containing
the backup archive file(s) and select the last incremental backup file or
the original full backup file if no incremental backup files were
subsequently created. Ensure that the correct drive letter and filename are
entered in the "File name:" text box. Click Next.

6. In the Acronis version 9 program, the "Archive Date Selection" screen
opens. Select (highlight) the last incremental backup file from the listing
and click Next. This screen does not appear in version 10.

7. The "Restoration Type Selection" screen opens. Select the option,
"Restore disks or partitions" and click Next.

8. The "Partition or Disk to Restore" will open. Click on "Disk 1" and click
Next.

9. After some moments the "Restored Hard Disk Drive Location" screen opens.
Select (highlight) the HDD to be restored and click Next.

10. On the next screen select the "Yes" option to delete all current
partitions on the destination HDD. Click Next.

11. On the next screen select the "No" option and click Next.

12. On the next screen you have the option to validate the backup archive
before restoration. Click Next.

13. The final screen before the restoration operation begins will open.
Confirm that the information as shown is correct. Click Proceed.

14. Click OK when following completion of the recovery operation a message
appears indicating a successful recovery operation.

15. Remove the Acronis bootable rescue CD and close the Acronis program. The
system will reboot. A Windows "Found New Hardware" message followed by the
"System Settings Change" message box may appear on the Desktop. If they do,
click Yes for a reboot.

Again, I prepared the above step-by-step instructions re the ATI v9 & v10
programs. Hopefully they will apply (for the most part) to v11 as well.
Anna
 

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