how do I insert a cents symbol (c with line through it)?


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G

Guest

Go to "Insert", "Symbol" pull down to Normal Text and you will find the
symbol for cents...click on it
 
D

DOsser

misha_at_work said:
using MSWord 2003.

If the font you're using has the cent symbol, just hold down the alt
key and press, in sequence, 0162. This should work in any application.

Or:

In MS Office products only, key in 00A2 and then, immediately press
Alt-X.

Or:

Open Charmap (Start / Run / Charmap), find the symbol in the font you
want, and double-click on it. That will "copy", and you can then
"paste" it into your text.

Or:

Download and install the greatest little utility, AllChars. With that
running, all you have to do is press, in sequence, Ctrl, c, /
Allchars has similarly easy-to-remember combinations for the most
common special symbols found in most quality fonts, such as ctrl, c, o
for the copyright symbol ©, ctrl, f, f, for the function symbol ƒ,
ctrl, L, L, for the pound sign, etc.
http://allchars.zwolnet.com/

- DOSser
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

Press Ctrl+/, release, then c.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA

Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
all may benefit.
 
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S

Summer

CTRL ALT C

DOsser said:
If the font you're using has the cent symbol, just hold down the alt key
and press, in sequence, 0162. This should work in any application.

Or:

In MS Office products only, key in 00A2 and then, immediately press
Alt-X.

Or:

Open Charmap (Start / Run / Charmap), find the symbol in the font you
want, and double-click on it. That will "copy", and you can then "paste"
it into your text.

Or:

Download and install the greatest little utility, AllChars. With that
running, all you have to do is press, in sequence, Ctrl, c, /
Allchars has similarly easy-to-remember combinations for the most common
special symbols found in most quality fonts, such as ctrl, c, o for the
copyright symbol ©, ctrl, f, f, for the function symbol ƒ, ctrl, L, L, for
the pound sign, etc.
http://allchars.zwolnet.com/

- DOSser
 
M

mtnpastor

This is one of the least intuitive aspects of MS Word. I have Word 2003 with
all the updates and to find the ¢ symbol, I have to go to insert, symbol,
then cursor down seven lines to get to the ¢ symbol. What I find odd about
this is the $ is on the first line of the symbol listing. Why is the ¢
symbol not right next to it!!! I find this odd and not typical of the way
most people think when they are searching for monetary symbols. Does anyone
out there agree? How do we go about communicating this to the MS Word/Office
staff to get an update that corrects this situation?
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

The symbols are listed in their ANSI or Unicode order (depending on the
display). The arrangement of character sets dates back to the Stone Age of
computing and, as the names imply (ANSI = American National Standards
Institute; for Unicode, see http://unicode.org/) the layout has been
determined by national/international standards organizations; it is not
something Microsoft can change any more than it can change the arrangement
of keys on a QWERTY keyboard.

But you don't need to go to Insert | Symbol just to insert the ¢ symbol. The
keyboard shortcut is Ctrl+/, c. Find more at
http://word.mvps.org/FAQs/General/InsertSpecChars.htm
 
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M

mtnpastor

Thank you for the prompt reply, Suzanne. That is very interesting and I
understand more now about why the symbols are arranged the way they are.
However, it still does not seem to me that it is very intuitive or user
friendly. This has been a frustration of mine for a long time and I would be
interested to know if others have expressed the same frustration. Just
because some intenational board dictates that something should be a certain
way, does that mean that everybody has to fall into step?
 
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D

Dan Freeman

If more people *did* fall in step with standards (Microsoft included),
things would be a lot easier for everyone because everything would always be
in the same place. There would be no need to hunt and search to discover how
THIS or THAT software package decided to implement it.

That's what standards are *for*. <s>

Dan
 

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